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Watch a Paul Thomas Anderson-Directed Music Video for Haim’s ‘Right Now’

11 hours ago

His upcoming film won’t be the only directorial work we’ll see from Paul Thomas Anderson this year. After creating three music videos for Radiohead last year, he’s back in the short-form realm with a new music for Haim‘s new single “Right Now.”

Filmed last November in North Hollywood, California, like his last two music videos, this one is all about capturing the performance. Utilizing a gorgeous single take, the beautiful, blue-tinted video finds PTA peering around the recording studio. Check it out below, along with a snap from the set, ahead of the release of their new album, Something to Tell You, on July 7.

This is where we start… live in the studio. We were so lucky to work with the amazing Paul Thomas Anderson on capturing just us. One take, live, at Valentine Studios during the recording of our second album. There’s more to come, »

- Jordan Raup

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Review: ‘Rupture’ is a Half-Cooked Body Horror Tale

12 hours ago

It’s taken ten years, but Secretary director Steven Shainberg has finally followed-up Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus. The result is Rupture, a body horror-lite tale about a woman held captive as part of an experiment meant to unlock humanity’s hidden potential to evolve beyond our current state. Written by Brian Nelson (the two share story credit), its script seeks to mess with our expectations as it does its prisoner Renee (Noomi Rapace). We’re to cultivate a sense of paranoia with surveillance dominating the first act to a point where we must scratch our heads at act two’s distinct lack of it to facilitate Renee’s actions. Is this shift an unfortunate plot-hole or merely deflection to distract us? Is it hallucination or reality, trick or mistake?

These are the questions we should ask because they allow us to dig deeper into the events surrounding »

- Jared Mobarak

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Tribeca Review: ‘The Lovers’ is Well-Acted, Unaffecting Farce

12 hours ago

When a film is labeled as being a marriage drama, it is usually without question that it will contain some aspect of infidelity, and while The Lovers indeed begins with this premise, it presents the rather rare situation of “re-fidelity.” Featuring superb performances from Tracy Letts and Debra Winger, writer-director Azazel Jacobs has assembled an impeccable ensemble, but his script doesn’t quite have the dramatic acumen to make his Terri follow-up much more than an amusing farce.

For many years, the relationship between Mary (Winger) and Michael (Letts) has been going through the motions, to put it kindly. Their dormant union is one where even a moment of eye contact is rare, best exemplified when Michael is in the bathroom, pretending to be brushing his teeth, but he’s actually on the phone, as his wife is doing the same in the bedroom. An evening when they are both »

- Jordan Raup

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First Images from Hong Sang-soo’s Cannes-Bound ‘Claire’s Camera’ and ‘The Day After’

12 hours ago

After bringing one of the year’s best films so far to Berlinale with On the Beach at Night Alone, Hong Sang-soo is returning to Cannes with not only his second of 2017, but his third as well. Premiering as a Special Screening is a film he actually shot at the festival, Claire’s Camera, which stars Isabelle Huppert and Kim Min-hee, following a part-time high school teacher and writer. Also starring Shahira Fahmy and Jung Jin-young, one can see the first images above and below.

As for his other film, The Day After, it will be premiering in competition at the festival. Also starring Kim Min-hee, along with Kwon Hae-hyo and Kim Sae-byeok, not much is known about the project, but judging from the first still, it looks to be in black-and-white. Check out the images below and return for our reviews of both films in the coming weeks. »

- Jordan Raup

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Review: ‘Below Her Mouth’ is an Exhilarating, Erotic Tour de Force

13 hours ago

Destined to be one of the year’s most provocative releases, April Mullen’s Below Her Mouth is an erotic tour de force of uninhibited filmmaking exploring the nature of intimacy, sexuality, and the female gaze led by two extraordinary performances by Erika Linder and Natalie Krill. Dallas (Linder) is a young roofer making her living in Toronto; early in the film she proves to be emotionally unavailable as she abruptly breaks up with her yuppie girlfriend Joslyn (Mayko Nguyen) and moves out into a studio apartment. While on a job in an upscale neighborhood she encounters Jasmine (Krill), a young fashion editor that’s about to be engaged to Rile (Sebastain Pigott), who by all measures seems to be a decent man, invested in their relationship even if he’s unable to offer the kind of connection and emotional support she longs for.

Out one evening on the town with a friend, »

- John Fink

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David Fincher Will Officially, Actually Direct a ‘World War Z’ Sequel as His Next Film

23 hours ago

Around the release of Gone Girl, I recall someone asking David Fincher why he wanted to adapt a pulpy best-seller instead of perhaps a more original project. His response was that he wanted people to actually show up to the multiplex to see his work, hinting at the rather cold initial response to his masterpiece. One has to imagine that’s a substantial reason for how he decided on his next project as he’s pushing that notion to extreme.

After various stages of attachment, Variety is reporting that The Social Network director has actually closed a deal to direct a sequel to World War Z. Although he did do a remake with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, this would mark his first direct sequel since his infamously bungled debut, Alien 3. Paramount is moving fast on the project as well, with production aiming to begin early next year, »

- Jordan Raup

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M. Night Shyamalan’s ‘Unbreakable’-and-‘Split’ Sequel ‘Glass’ Will Arrive in 2019

23 hours ago

For seventeen years, fans of M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable have wished for a sequel to the moody superhero drama. Now it looks like the filmmaker is making their wish come true: Shyamalan announced today on Twitter that his next film will be Glass, a sequel to both Unbreakable and his most recent film Split. This news gives away a twist involving Split: a brief ending scene reveals it’s set in same universe as Unbreakable.

“My new film is the sequel to #Unbreakable And #Split. It was always my dream to have both films collide in this third film,” Shyamalan tweeted, confirming that Unbreakable’s Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson would both return, along with Split’s James McAvoy and Anya Taylor-Joy.

Unbreakable focused on depressed security guard David Dunn (Willis) who, after surviving a deadly train crash, realizes he’s never been sick or injured in his entire life. »

- The Film Stage

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Tribeca Review: ‘Abundant Acreage Available’ is a Quietly Moving Character Study

23 hours ago

Faith-based cinema is as diverse a genre as there is, from the extreme, often violent portraits of devotion from established directors like Martin Scorsese and Mel Gibson, to the attacks on logic in the God’s Not Dead and Left Behind pictures. Angus MacLachlan, a great storyteller of the not-too-deep south, offers a nuanced example of what this genre can bring, returning with the moving Abundant Acreage Available. The title may signal a light-hearted film, and given MacLachlan’s previous feature (the charming sex comedy Goodbye To All That) and writing credits (which include Phil Morrison’s masterpiece Junebug), you might be forgiven for having that expectation. However, MacLachlan’s latest is a departure from his previous work: a quiet, powerful portrait of two families at a crossroads, featuring the middle-aged Ledbetters — including the reformed alcoholic Jesse (Terry Kinney) and his adopted sister Tracy (Amy Ryan) — and three aging brothers (Max Gail, »

- John Fink

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Watch: Video Compilation Evokes the Power of Jonathan Demme’s Close-Ups

26 April 2017 1:09 PM, PDT

The news of Jonathan Demme‘s death, while remarkably sad, has had at least one positive effect: across the film world and on social media we’ve seen an outpouring of love for one of our most versatile and effective filmmakers, one that’s unique for commending the artist and person. Take a quick look at the films and you’ll start to understand why. His treatment of people, how he photographed actors and allowed them to express a range of emotion that’s rare in any kind of art, would overpower viewers, and not always in the most obvious ways. How many of us saw Silence of the Lambs at a young age and were particularly moved by a series of close-ups whose place and effect we’d fail to describe? How much more easily could Beloved or Philadelphia just been social-issue movies if they weren’t such direct »

- Nick Newman

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First Teaser for Hirokazu Kore-eda’s Crime Drama ‘The Third Murder’

26 April 2017 6:15 AM, PDT

“The story is about an attorney, a murderer, and the family of a victim,” director Hirokazu Kore-eda told us earlier this year, referencing his upcoming feature The Third Murder. Following his stellar drama After the Storm, the Japanese director is shifting gears to more genre-focused fare, while seemingly still retaining a human core at the center, for his next film.

While it wasn’t ready for Cannes as editing is still underway, his next feature will arrive in Japan this September and the first teaser has arrived. Starring Masaharu Fukuyama and Koji Yakusho, the film centers on a crime trial about a homicide 30 years ago in which a president of a factory was killed, but now a lawyer has doubts about his client.

Check out the trailer below, courtesy of Cine Maldito, and see the director’s 10 favorite films.

»

- Jordan Raup

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Locarno in L.A. Review: ‘Destruction Babies’ Subverts the Action Genre

26 April 2017 6:03 AM, PDT

If Sion Sono directed the “Pick a fight with a stranger” sequence from Fight Club without any fantastical flourish, it’d come out something like Destruction Babies. That one sentence might be enough to turn certain people off ever watching this film – and fair enough, since there’s a minimal chance they’d even remotely like it. Hell, even if that description intrigues you, this movie might still not be for you. It is willfully, aggressively unpleasant, a domino string of violent scenes that are deliberately anti-entertaining.

Think about the usual mechanics of cinematic fight scenes, and Destruction Babies does the opposite. The camera spectates from a cold, steady remove. There’s zero feeling of choreography, as combatants flail about messily, missing their punches and kicks as often as they hit. There are few fancy moves – men dance around one another until one of them pins the other and then proceeds to pummel him mercilessly, »

- Daniel Schindel

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First Look at Juliette Binoche in Claire Denis’ ‘Let the Sunshine In’

26 April 2017 5:28 AM, PDT

After the best surprise possible to kick off the new year — the announcement that Claire Denis would be imminently beginning production on a new drama, one starring Juliette Binoche, Gérard Depardieu, and Xavier Beauvois — the Beau travail director was also able to finish it in in times for Cannes. Now set to open Directors’ Fortnight, the first look has arrived.

Adapted from Roland Barthes‘ A Lover’s Discourse: Fragments, which deconstructs the language of love, the film also has a new title after initially going by Dark Glasses. Screen Daily reports the English title is Let the Sunshine In (aka Un Beau Soleil Intérieur). Also starring Bruno Podalydès and Josiane Balasko, Directors’ Fortnight Artistic director Edouard Waintrop, says of the film. “What touched us is that it marks a radical change in tone for Claire Denis. We like it when film-makers try something new.”

See the Amazon synopsis for Barthes »

- Jordan Raup

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Tribeca Review: ‘One Percent More Humid’ Succumbs to Episodic Melodrama

26 April 2017 5:18 AM, PDT

Opening with a toast to their health, look-a-like BFFs Catherine (Julia Garner) and Iris (Juno Temple) return to their New England hamlet for one of those few weeks they’ll never forget in Liz W. Garcia’s fairly predictable character study One Percent More Humid. Stuck for the summer in a small town fueled by a local college and blue-collar industries, where everyone drinks at the same bars and eats at the same deli, there’s very little to do besides get drunk, get stoned, and get recklessly involved with two very different kinds of manipulative bad boys as Catherine and Iris cope collectively with a past trauma.

Written and directed by Garcia, whose early career includes writing credits on Dawson’s Creek, One Percent More Humid bares some similarities to that television saga as Catherine and Iris battle their own mistakes while making new ones. Set in an academic hamlet off Annsbury, »

- John Fink

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Federico Fellini’s ‘La Strada’ Returns with Trailer for Theatrical Restoration

26 April 2017 4:35 AM, PDT

One of Federico Fellini’s most acclaimed films has been given a new 2K digital restoration, and if you’re in the U.K., you are lucky enough to be able to see it on the big screen next month. This May, the winner of the the inaugural Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, La Strada, will return to theaters there, and they’ve released a new trailer.

Featuring a heartbreaking performance from Giulietta Masina, the film tells the story of her struggle under the brutish Zampanò (Anthony Quinn) as they tour Italy. While we’ll hopefully see the restoration come stateside eventually, check out the trailer below, along with synopsis and new poster.

In a story of true outsiders, Masina plays Gelsomina, a naïve young woman sold by her desperate mother to boorish strongman Zampanò (an immensely charismatic Anthony Quinn) to be both his wife and performance assistant as he tours central Italy. »

- Jordan Raup

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Paul Verhoeven Sets ‘Elle’ Follow-Up With ‘Blessed Virgin’

26 April 2017 4:22 AM, PDT

Coming off one of his best films, the complex, twisted Isabelle Huppert-led drama Elle, director Paul Verhoeven has quickly found his follow-up. Another French-language film, he’ll be adapting Judith C. Brown’s Immodest Acts: The Life Of A Lesbian Nun In Renaissance Italy with Blessed Virgin (aka Sainte Vierge).

Reteaming with producer Saïd Ben Saïd, according to a (slightly Nsfw) tweet below, the film will star Virginie Efira, who made an impression in Elle. According to Screen Daily, the actress will play the role of Benedetta Carlini, a 17th-century nun hailing from Pescia in Tuscany who stirred up controversy with “lurid mystic visions and the appearance of stigmata on her body,” as well as evidence she had affairs with fellow nuns.

Scripted by Verhoeven’s frequent collaborator Gerard Soeteman, the idea of the director doing another female-led film, this time seemingly embracing the nunsploitation subgenre, has us greatly looking forward to the project. »

- Jordan Raup

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Review: ‘Obit’ Confronts Death with Warmth and Utter Charm

26 April 2017 4:02 AM, PDT

On June 25, 2009, 70s icon Farrah Fawcett passed away after a long battle with cancer. Her obituary in The New York Times recalled her “signature flowing hairstyle” and the red bathing suit poster that first made her a star. It also mentioned her work in Charlie’s Angels and her marriage to Six Million Dollar Man‘s Lee Majors. It was a succinct, tasteful piece that bid farewell to a beloved celebrity whose death was, sadly, not unexpected. But as we learn in Vanessa Gould’s documentary Obit, the sense of calm left in the obituary department in the wake of Fawcett’s demise was quickly dispelled when news arrived that the King of Pop had died. Michael Jackson’s sudden death occurred at a time when the writers were getting ready to go home, and being The New York Times, the staff knew they needed to publish something that very day. »

- Jose Solís

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David Mackenzie, Ben Foster, and Chris Pine to Make ‘Hell or High Water’ Reunion with ‘Outlaw King’

25 April 2017 1:07 PM, PDT

A Hell or High Water reunion may be making its way to Netflix: Deadline reports that the studio’s finalizing a deal for director David Mackenzie to helm the epic period drama Outlaw King, which Chris Pine and Ben Foster would be headlining.

Outlaw King will focus on Robert the Bruce, the king who led Scotland during the First War of Scottish Independence against England. The historical figure was previously featured in Mel Gibson’s Braveheart, as played by Angus Macfadyen. Pine is expected to play the Scottish king, while Foster would play James Douglas, a knight who became the king’s chief adviser.

Braveheart portrayed Robert the Bruce as a bit of a pushover who gets tricked by his leprosy-ridden father into betraying Gibson’s William Wallace. Outlaw King will seek to restore the king to the national hero he’s still regarded as in Scotland today. Per Deadline, »

- TFS Staff

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‘Silent Light’: Carlos Reygadas’ Cosmic and Personal Drama of Austere Simplicity

25 April 2017 5:54 AM, PDT

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

“Amen” is the first word uttered in Silent Light — an appropriate and reverent punctuation to follow the glory that director Carlos Reygadas unveils in the film’s opening minutes. Beginning in a milky, celestial darkness that then »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Rumble Fish,’ ‘Tampopo,’ ‘Kaili Blues,’ ‘La La Land,’ and More

25 April 2017 5:23 AM, PDT

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Anatahan (Josef von Sternberg)

Josef von Sternberg called Anatahan his best film. Borne from more than a decade’s worth of frustration with the studio system, it was, as the last picture he completed, his stamp on his time as a director. Even then, when released in 1953, it was only released in a butchered format, and, as it often goes in such cases, was subsequently abandoned by popular consciousness. But a few times each year, cinephiles (at least »

- The Film Stage

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Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone are Today’s Bogart and Bacall, According to Damien Chazelle

25 April 2017 4:54 AM, PDT

Damien Chazelle‘s vibrant ode to musicals past, featuring the unstoppable chemistry between stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, was a shining light for many at the end of a hard year,” we said when we named it one of the best films of 2016. “Exploring the hardships of a creative life, both in paying the bills and fueling the passion, Chazelle pulls from classics (New York, New York comes to mind), while playing with the cynicism of the now. Jazz is dying, film is dying, but, by God, there will be dancing. There will be singing. And there will be wonderfully lensed romantic kisses to composed crescendoes. Maybe we will be all right.”

With the film now arriving on Blu-ray and DVD, we’re pleased to debut an exclusive excerpt from a bonus feature in which Chazelle and company reflect on the chemistry of Gosling and Stone. The director even »

- Jordan Raup

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