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Child of Light is Gorgeously Fun | Xbox One Review

21 hours ago

I recently got my first Xbox One and by me, I mean my boyfriend won the new console out of a crane machine at the mall (for real) and I am jealous. So, I have to play his until I can buy my own which feels excruciatingly far away (I am still a bit bitter his was free, can you tell?) Either way, it has been an exciting week!

The month of April was actually an anniversary month for the popular Games with Gold program for Xbox Live members and because of that we got two free games this month, one of them being Child of Light. I had been eyeing this release for months and since it was conveniently free, it was the first game I played on the Xbox One. I was (thankfully) not disappointed At All.

Child of Light is a side-scrolling RPG that puts players in the shoes of Aurora, »

- Sarah Sommer

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Bloodshot Reborn #1 Review | Lemire’s Valiant Inherent Vice

14 April 2015 3:32 PM, PDT

Really anticipating Bloodshot Reborn #1 from Valiant since reading all of the high drama that occurred in The Valiant #4, which was amazing.  I think Matt Kindt successfully  relaunched Ninjak recently and I was excited to see how the other half of The Valiant writing team, one Jeff Lemire,  would do with Bloodshot, who probably walked away from the occurrences of the mini more changed then any other character. I recently read Lemire’s Descender and in the middle of a write-up on that, and it’s icy.

Bloodshot is one of my favorite characters, and going to get the first issue of his first series is one of those childhood comic book memories that stick out, and while not in monetary value, the page I have from that issue is one of the most valuable to me.

I’m also a big fan of Lemire in general. I’m not in love with Bloodshot Reborn though. »

- Jay Tomio

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Shadowbridge by Gregory Frost Review | Bridges Over Walls

14 April 2015 6:41 AM, PDT

The vision of a bridge probably invokes the feeling of simplicity, a means to go from A to B or vice versa, at time ornate, but more likely, sensible, serviceable, and functional, but bridges in fiction have led us to many memorable moments. Whether the Bridge of Khazad-dûm, Goats Gruff, Jon Orr, or perhaps most memorable to me, a standoff between brothers, Benedict and Brand, fans of speculative fiction have tread many bridges and with Shadow Bridge, Gregory Frost brings to us a world made of bridges, bringing a literal walkways to the figurative that exists all around us.

Our travels take us to different spans, an apt description considering our protagonist‘s ‘magic’ is in her hands – a master shadow puppeteer – as she looks back on her travels, collecting and sharing stories, and performing in a manner that had not been witnessed since a generation before. Leodora, whose stage name, »

- Jay Tomio

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Game of Thrones The Wars to Come | Review

13 April 2015 5:13 PM, PDT

Season 5 of HBO’s Game of Thrones has arrived with ‘The Wars to Come’ and  no signs of Julian Bashir, sand snakes or Dorne yet , a subject I talked a lot about previously, but stuff happened. I guess?

First scene reminds me a bit of the first scene from the first episode of the series, the prologue in the first book, it’s a bit of this horror vignette. As lil Cersei points out the witch doesn’t look as bad as one would think, I think it makes her statements stronger, her power isn’t charlatan and trickery or even traditional, she’s the goods. Like the prologue it involves a hint of the supernatural, which I guess only happens in the woods.  I know people won’t agree with this because generally people complain about beautifying something up, but I don’t know, it’s not like her appearance matters much, »

- Jay Tomio

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Red Seas Under Red Skies by Scott Lynch Review | The Thorn of Camorr Returns

13 April 2015 7:00 AM, PDT

We find the remnants of our band stalking the pits of the Sinspire, patiently and calculatingly ascending lady luck’s ladder in Lynch’s Monte Carlo, the city-state Tal Verrar, marked on any map as the destination for the apex of high society and high stakes. The absurdity of the back in-saddle starting point exhibits the author’s greatest strength, his decisions on how to pace a novel. The cuts to the recent past, giving us the anatomy of the scheme and farther back to moments transpiring in the direct aftermath of The Lies of Locke Lamora  are perfectly placed, once again functioning as a new door to open just before the occupied space stagnates. You seem to never be anywhere but where you want to be, Lynch just doesn’t let you in on the fact until a chapter later, and the reader isn’t sprinting or running a »

- Jay Tomio

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