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At the drive-in: Julien Temple's Glastonbury Cineramageddon

4 hours ago

One day the film-maker hopes to project movies on to the clouds. But for now he’s launching a drive-in unlike any other

Glastonbury is a lot of things: Britain’s biggest music festival, a hedonistic wonderland, a rally stop for Jeremy Corbyn. However, it’s unlikely anyone would think of it as a cineaste’s paradise.

Ok, perhaps that’s a little unfair. The festival’s resident cinema, the Pilton Palais, celebrates its 35th anniversary this year, and has seen some notable premieres, most recently of Asif Kapadia’s Amy Winehouse doc. Film, however, has generally been relegated to a supporting role.

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- Gwilym Mumford

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The Big Sick review – Kumail Nanjiani's real-life romcom is a humane delight

7 hours ago

The stand-up comic turned Silicon Valley star teams up with Judd Apatow to tell the charming story of how he met his wife

If you’re a comic keen to express, in great detail, the many difficulties of your everyday life on screen, then congrats – Hollywood wants to hear your story, even if a mass audience often doesn’t. The critical success of Louie has led to shows from Tig Nataro, Marc Maron, Pete Holmes, Cameron Esposito, Maria Bamford and Aziz Ansari, all riffing on versions of themselves with mixed, and sometimes under-seen, results. It’s become a strangely overpopulated sub-genre of late, and a feature-length film based on the early days of standup-turned-sitcom star Kumail Nanjiani arrives at a time when it feels as necessary as another superhero reboot.

Related: Kumail Nanjiani: 'For a long time, there was one famous American brown actor'

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- Benjamin Lee

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Ron Howard signed up to direct Star Wars spin-off Han Solo movie

7 hours ago

Veteran director takes over after Lego Movie co-directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller fired two days ago after clashing with studio heads

The Da Vinci Code’s Ron Howard has replaced The Lego Movie’s Phil Lord and Chris Miller as director of the Han Solo spin-off movie, the much-anticipated new instalment of the Star Wars standalone series.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Howard joined the film two days after Lord and Miller were sensationally fired over “creative differences” with the film’s producers Lucasfilm. Reports have suggested clashes with veteran scriptwriter Lawrence Kasdan were at least partly responsible.

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- Andrew Pulver

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The Graduate review – Hoffman and Bancroft are as irresistibly watchable as ever

7 hours ago

Attitudes have changed since Anne Bancroft’s predatory seduction of hapless Dustin Hoffman, but this rereleased classic remains a hugely pleasurable experience

If ever a movie captured the audience’s imagination with its musical soundtrack, it was The Graduate, that irresistibly watchable 1967 classic, now rereleased in cinemas, starring as Anne Bancroft as the sexy and jaded fortysomething Mrs Robinson, who seduces 21-year-old Ben, played by the young Dustin Hoffman – that muddled young man whose sentimental education begins only after he graduates college.

Simon and Garfunkel’s eerie and sublime The Sound of Silence perfectly captures both Ben’s alienation and bewilderment about what he should do with his life, and then his postcoital disenchantment and self-loathing. And Here’s to You Mrs Robinson, with its gentle reassurance that Jesus loves her, provides a note of final gentleness and forgiveness for this character that is really nowhere in the script. It is, incidentally, very different from Billy Paul’s woozily sensual soul song Me and Mrs Jones, which came out four years later.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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On the set of Edgar Wright’s Baby Driver: ‘Everything is fun with Jamie Foxx around’

8 hours ago

Bullitt collides with Barry White in the British director’s most ambitious project to date. Wright and his stars Ansel Elgort, Jon Hamm and Lily James explain why this noisy heist is a Hollywood ‘unicorn’

Edgar Wright is in remarkably, unfathomably good spirits. It’s day 23 of a high-pressure shoot for Baby Driver, the director’s latest and biggest film, and Wright is standing on a closed-off portion of a highway in Atlanta, overseeing a frenetic car chase on a scale that easily surpasses anything he’s made before.

Wright is casually propped up against one of the many vehicles on the road, wearing a boater and looking like the postcard embodiment of an Englishman abroad. As he excitedly talks about the world he created on paper coming to life, Jamie Foxx walks past in a boilersuit. “Everything is fun with Jamie Foxx around,” Wright says, beaming at his Oscar-winning star. “We have Gladys Knight and the Pips playing, so we good,” Foxx replies, one earphone in.

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- Benjamin Lee

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The Book of Henry is a catastrophically awful film. Everyone should see it

8 hours ago

Tonally it jerks from syrupy to shrill, filled with A-list actors working without conviction or connection. This is a film to be studied in What Not to Do classes

It had the star-wattage and the slick presentation, the money behind it, the talent on screen, the entire infrastructure of a major studio available to keep everything on course, and you have to wonder why The Book of Henry went so catastrophically wrong.

Related: The Book of Henry review – icky revenge weepie pours syrup over everything

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- John Patterson

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The Good, the Bad and the Ugly's graveyard comes back from the dead

11 hours ago

Documentary honours film fans who laboured to restore setting for 1966 spaghetti western’s climactic scene

After more than 50 years, several fistfuls of euros and countless wheelbarrow journeys, one of the most famous graveyards in cinema history has been rescued from oblivion and is to be honoured in a new documentary.

Sad Hill cemetery is the setting for the climax of The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, when Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef and Eli Wallach face off against each other to the strains of Ennio Morricone.

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- Sam Jones in Madrid

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Nobody Speak: Trials of the Free Press review – Hulk v Gawker in portrait of wealthy arrogance

11 hours ago

This new Netflix docu-feature examines Hogan’s case against the gossip site, highlighting other wealthy figures aggressively seeking to silence the press

The extraordinary case of Hulk Hogan’s 2015 legal action against the gossip website Gawker is far shadier, far creepier than many appreciate. Certainly, I didn’t realise that, until I saw this punchy documentary which sites it in a new context. The Hogan attack was a vanguard operation in the aggressive new reactionary philistinism and hatred of press freedom being nurtured by some of America’s super-rich which is encouraged as a political diversionary tactic by the Us president.

The wrestler sued Gawker for posting a sex tape of him with his best friend’s wife – the video was allegedly made and distributed without his knowledge. Much later, it was revealed that the suit was secretly bankrolled by the Silicon Valley billionaire, Ayn Rand-ist libertarian and Trump supporter Peter Thiel – apparently in revenge for Gawker outing him as gay. So far, so debatable. There are many who feel that both Hulk and Thiel were entitled to privacy and had no great sympathy for Gawker and its trashy, bitchy stories. But this film shows that there is ample evidence that Hogan knew that the tape was being made and was ready to let it accidentally-on-purpose emerge to promote his reality-tv career, panicking only when he thought that a longer version would become public, revealing his racist language. As for Thiel he was already furious at Gawker’s ValleyWag column and its continual, irreverent criticism of him and his financial performance, and had, in any case, a highly authoritarian contempt for the democratic impulses of the press. Thiel and Hogan won a staggering $140m in damages, enough to knock over first amendment issues and put Gawker out of business.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Rebel Wilson's $7m damages claim should be thrown out, Bauer Media says

12 hours ago

Actor seeks money over eight articles that defamed her in May 2015, including $5.89m in special damages

Rebel Wilson’s “extraordinarily large” special damages claim should be thrown out because she has failed to prove she suffered losses as a result of a series of defamatory magazine articles, a court has heard.

Wilson is seeking $5.893m in special damages – which would cover the loss of one film role – and general damages of $1.2m, bringing total damages sought to an “extremely conservative” $7.093m.

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- Australian Associated Press

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Edith Walks review – eccentric trek in pursuit of Englishness

17 hours ago

Andrew Kötting’s psychogeographical journey from Waltham Abbey to Hastings – with contributions from Alan Moore and Iain Sinclair en route – is filled with a wayward integrity

Another eccentric, strange yet weirdly engaging journey along the leyline of Englishness by experimental film-maker Andrew Kötting, flying under the radar of conventional history and conventional production values. This zero-to-no-budget piece is something like a filmed moment of street theatre or Pythonesque subversion of the English past. It is a kind of occult dress-up pilgrimage, tracing in reverse an imaginary journey between Waltham Abbey and Hastings, conceptually reuniting King Harold with Edith Swan-Neck, his secular or “hand-fast” wife, who identified his body after the Battle of Hastings and secured him a Christian burial at Waltham Abbey. Kötting and his company make their journey in costume, pausing to consider and contemplate along the way, with ruminative contributions from Iain Sinclair and Alan Moore, who discuss the mythic relativeness of Edith’s identity and the psychogeographical implications of everything else. Moore comments gnomically: “You can always tell an authentic battlefield.” Well, only a pedant or a bore would insist on leading Mr Moore blindfold to three or four fields to test the truth of that. Like everything else in this piece, it has its own wayward integrity.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Western legend: Marlon Brando's One-Eyed Jacks – archive, 22 June 1961

17 hours ago

22 June 1961: Brando’s directorial debut brings back to the western genre a sense of period and a sense of community

With the arrival of Marlon Brando’s One-Eyed Jacks, possibly the best Western film since Shane, one begins to speculate all over again on the future of this thankfully inexhaustible genre. And perhaps the most important and impressive feature of Brando’s piece is that it brings back to the Western a sense of period, a sense of community, decidedly lacking during the last few years.

Related: Lonely rangers: the dark side of westerns

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- Douglas McVay

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Hotel Coolgardie trailer: watch an Australian outback nightmare unfold – video

18 hours ago

Director Pete Gleeson’s observational documentary explores what happens when two 20-something Finnish backpackers land in a small Western Australian mining town and begin working at the pub

‘I was crying, and I was angry’: Hotel Coolgardie’s shocking portrait of sexism in the outback Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

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‘I was crying, and I was angry’: Hotel Coolgardie's shocking portrait of sexism in the outback

20 hours ago

Two Finnish backpackers find themselves under siege when they take jobs behind the bar in this Western Australia mining-town pub

It’s a premise right out of Wake in Fright: a pair of penniless down-on-their-luck foreigners arrive in a backwater Australian town located in the middle of sun-baked, dirt-slathered, sweat-stained nowhere.

Here there is just a pub and a swimming pool. And of course, the locals.

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- Luke Buckmaster

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Diverse casting leads to box office success, study shows

21 June 2017 2:01 PM, PDT

A study released by the Creative Artists Agency showed that, from 2014 to 2016, films with more diverse casts outperformed others at the box office

A new study by the Creative Artists Agency (CAA) says that films with more diverse casts perform better at the box office than less diverse ones, confirming what people and actors of color have been saying for years.

The data, which studied 413 films released between January 2014 and December 2016, catalogued the ethnicity of the top 10 actors per film, noting that those with at least a 30% non-white cast have tended to financially outperform films that fail to reach that threshold.

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- Jake Nevins

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Stephen Furst obituary

21 June 2017 10:32 AM, PDT

Actor, director and voiceover artist who played Flounder in the 1978 film National Lampoon’s Animal House

Flounder, the hapless fraternity student in the 1978 film National Lampoon’s Animal House, was Stephen Furst’s signature role, and one that Furst, who has died aged 63 of complications from diabetes, was typecast into recapitulating for much of the rest of his career. It’s Flounder (aka Kent Dorfman) who is told by Dean Wormer (John Vernon) that “fat, drunk and stupid is no way to go through life, son”. It’s Flounder who, after his friends have trashed his brother’s cherished car, hears Otter (Tim Matheson) explain: “You can’t spend your whole life worrying about your mistakes. You fucked up. You trusted us.”

But the sensitivity Furst brought to Dorfman, who gets into the frat only because, as Stork points out, “we need the dues”, made Flounder real and popular: he had a naive innocence, an unawareness of his physical appearance, and a caring sense of humour. Audiences could imagine him growing into the role of a kinder, gentler version of fellow student Bluto (John Belushi).

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- Michael Carlson

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From Notting Hill to Hampstead: why do directors get London so wrong?

21 June 2017 10:28 AM, PDT

Dancing cockneys, cobbled streets, red phoneboxes and cold cliques … why are film-makers still peddling dated tourist-friendly fantasies of London when the reality is so much more interesting?

“Portobello Road! Portobello Road! / Street where the riches of ages are stowed / Anything but anything a chap can unload / Is sold off the barrow of Portobello Road / You can find what you want in the Pooooortobelllllllo Road!”

Until I moved to London from New York that song, performed in the 1971 Disney classic Bedknobs and Broomsticks, formed the entire basis of my idea of the city. As a kid I was obsessed with this movie, in which three children are sent out of London during the second world war, only to go back into the city with their new guardian – who happens to be a witch, and even more excitingly happens to be Angela Lansbury – to find a book of spells which will end the war. So they head, yes, to Portobello Road.

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- Hadley Freeman

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The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger review – Tilda Swinton leads lavish praise

21 June 2017 8:36 AM, PDT

The Okja actor joins a refreshing celebration of the late Ways of Seeing writer – plus a hilarious lesson in how to ride a motorbike

One year before he died at the age of 90, art critic and author John Berger was the subject of this musingly celebratory quartet of documentary essay-portraits, now on UK release – almost the cinematic equivalent of a Festschrift.

Its writers, directors and contributors feature Berger’s circle of friends, prominent among them the writer and producer Colin MacCabe and the actor Tilda Swinton. Intimate interviews and conversations are interspersed with clips of Berger in his handsome prime, the dazzling broadcaster and creator of the television series and critical work Ways of Seeing; MacCabe contrives some Godardian flourishes.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Diane Keaton: 'People in London drink in the afternoon ... wow!' – video interview

21 June 2017 7:28 AM, PDT

Diane Keaton’s new film is set in, and named after, the prosperous London district of Hampstead; she co-stars with Brendan Gleeson in a romantic comedy about an American woman who strikes up a relationship with an eccentric itinerant who lives in a shack on Hampstead Heath. Directed by Joel Hopkins and also featuring Simon Callow and James Norton, Hampstead is released on 23 July

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- Sophie Zeldin-O'Neill, James Turner and Jacob Dixon

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Daniel Day-Lewis: an extraordinary career of acting artistry – is it really all over?

21 June 2017 1:53 AM, PDT

The man with the most best actor Oscars has announced his retirement. Let’s hope he changes his mind – screen-acting careers don’t get any more brilliant than his

So Daniel Day-Lewis has joined Steven Soderbergh, Ken Loach and Jack Nicholson in the ranks of movie greats who have announced that most unthinkably non-showbusiness move: retirement. At the age of just 60, the legendary triple Oscar winner – recipient of more best actor Oscars than anyone in Academy Award history – says that his next film, Paul Thomas Anderson’s fashion drama Phantom Thread, will be his last. As with those other giants, we have to hope that Sir Daniel will soon feel the need to hand back the carriage clock, hang up the golf clubs and resume his vocation.

Related: Daniel Day-Lewis announces retirement from acting

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Star Wars: Han Solo spin-off directors fired after 'creative differences'

21 June 2017 1:25 AM, PDT

Studio and directors Phil Lord and Christopher Miller part ways during production as directors say ‘for once the cliche creative differences is true’

The directors of the forthcoming Star Wars Han Solo spin-off have parted ways with the studio midway through the film’s production.

Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy said that Phil Lord and Christopher Miller had left the production due to “different creative visions” for the film, which stars Alden Ehrenreich as a young version of beloved Star Wars character Han Solo.

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- Gwilym Mumford

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