Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 89 items   « Prev | Next »


Oscar foreign language nominees issue joint statement on travel ban – video

23 minutes ago

The six directors whose films are nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at Sunday’s Oscars ceremony have released a joint statement condemning “the climate of fanaticism and nationalism” rising in the Us and around the world. On the red carpet ahead of the event ‘Tanna’ co-director Bentley Dean said the filmmakers had chosen to take action after seeing “thousands of people on the streets protesting” against “some mad man coming up with some racist, stupid idea”

Foreign language Oscar nominees decry ‘climate of fanaticism in Us’ Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


It's my first time attending the Oscars – here's my wishlist for the night | Peter Bradshaw

3 hours ago

Will La La Land clean up? Will the stars come out against Trump’s travel ban? And will Ryan Seacrest give a certain debonair British film critic the red carpet moment he deserves?

I have to admit that I am rather excited about the 2017 Oscars ceremony. Because this year, for the first time in its history, the ceremony’s dinner-jacketed audience is to include … me. After years of pining, Cinderella-like, at home in London, or watching the ceremony in the office, mashing Pringles and Diet Coke into the gaps between the laptop keys, I have been invited to the ball. Stepping daintily out of the Uber that has transported me from the Econo Lodge in Burbank, I get to go on the red carpet — apparently a brief and heavily policed admission with a herd of other overseas, overexcited bozos — and then I get to sit in the theatre, way up in the “nosebleed” seats. »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


By numbers: breaking down the key facts behind the Oscars

5 hours ago

How rude can a movie be and still win best picture? How many men with toupees have triumphed? And does anyone watch it anyway? We’ve trawled the archives to unearth the real history of the Academy Awards

TV ratings for the Oscars broadcast have been on a steep decline in the Us, despite the producers revamping the ceremony and drafting in an endless parade of new hosts. Polls this year suggest that a Trump-focused show could prove a turn-off for his supporters – so incoming host Jimmy Kimmel will have his work cut out. The one thing that does make people tune in is really giving a damn about the big movie. In 1998, 57.3m people watched James Cameron’s iceberg-fated romance trawl its way to 11 wins. This year, six in 10 Americans can’t name a single Oscar nominee. You do the maths.

Continue reading »

- Guardian graphics

Permalink | Report a problem


Dress to protest: why the Oscars red carpet is set for a revolution | Jess Cartner-Morley

7 hours ago

The ceremony’s biggest political statements might come not from the podium, but on the catwalk outside, as the stars hit the campaign trail Hollywood cares about most

Hollywood has had a lot to say for itself recently. Meryl Streep, a 20-time Academy Award nominee, riled the Trump White House with her Golden Globes speech. Tom Ford, who directed Nocturnal Animals, refuses to dress the first lady. George Clooney says of Donald Trump: “I didn’t vote for him, I don’t support him, I don’t think he’s the right choice.” Natalie Portman, meanwhile, took to the podium at last month’s Women’s March in Los Angeles to call for a women’s revolution against the Us president. Graydon Carter’s Vanity Fair, the publication of record for the west coast entertainment industry, has pulled no punches in its editorial attacks on Trump. In the new America, »

- Jess Cartner-Morley

Permalink | Report a problem


The Fits review – unnerving mystery

7 hours ago

Anna Rose Holmer’s terrific debut invites comparisons with Hitchcock as tensions rise in a local youth centre

The pure products of the Us go briefly, unnervingly crazy in The Fits, a terrific rites-of-passage drama that charts an outbreak of mass hysteria inside a Cincinnati sports centre. Full credit to debut director Anna Rose Holmer for wringing the maximum mileage from a paltry $170,000 (£13,600) budget. Restricting herself to a single location and its immediate surrounds, she whips up a quiet storm of everyday horror; an allegory of adolescence, crawling with existential dread. The Fits is a small, spare picture; it blows in and off the screen in 71 minutes flat. But it shakes you to the core and the effects last for days.

This small, spare picture whips up an allegory of adolescence, crawling with existential dread

Continue reading »

- Xan Brooks

Permalink | Report a problem


Patriots Day review – taut dramatisation of the Boston marathon bombing

8 hours ago

Mark Wahlberg and director Peter Berg team up again after Deepwater Horizon for this briskly paced procedural

There’s something very satisfying about films that follow professionals tested by extraordinary situations – movies like Paul Greengrass’s United 93 for example. Director Peter Berg has already delivered one such celebration of the skilled everyman with Deepwater Horizon. He reunites with Deepwater star Mark Wahlberg for Patriots Day, a taut, multi-stranded account of the Boston marathon bombing.

As a police procedural, this is first-rate: unflinching, briskly paced film-making that pieces together the fast-moving investigation in a wholly satisfying manner. The nature of the terror attack means that there are distressing images of injuries. Berg doesn’t shy away from this, but he pulls back out of a sense of decency when it comes to the fatalities. Boston-born Wahlberg is strong in the central role, a tough-guy cop with a temper and a »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


It’s Only the End of the World review – spittle-flecked drama

8 hours ago

An adaptation of a play about a gay man’s return to the bosom of his family is not easy to watch – or listen to

The latest picture from the prolific Canadian wunderkind Xavier Dolan is certainly not the easiest watch. An adaptation of a play by Jean-Luc Lagarce that tells of the return of a sensitive, successful gay son to his tempestuous family home, this is stridently confrontational in its approach. Dolan favours so many extreme, spittle-flecked closeups of shouting family members that it leaves you gasping for breath and longing for a wide shot.

Gaspard Ulliel plays prodigal son Louis, Nathalie Baye is screechy and lurid as his mother and Marion Cotillard delivers sensitive work as the browbeaten sister-in-law he has never met. But it’s Vincent Cassel’s character who is the most problematic – older brother Antoine is furious but it’s a hollow, noisy anger that »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


Best (George Best: All By Himself) review – recycled pub anecdotes

8 hours ago

A documentary portrait of the Manchester United star shows us little that we haven’t seen before

What aims to be an Amy-style documentary portrait of a troubled genius ends up as a rehash of every prurient tabloid story that crowed over George Best’s self-destructive behaviour without trying to understand the root of it.

Best is most satisfying when it explores the early years of a footballer so skilled that even someone completely uninterested in the game could recognise his talent. But most of the talking-head interviews here are second tier and their insights little more than pub anecdotes.

Continue reading »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


A Cure for Wellness review – slick horror full of plot holes

8 hours ago

While weirdly impressive, Gore Verbinski’s sanatorium shocker runs more on atmosphere than logic

It takes some chutzpah to start a story in the sterile boardrooms and status-clawing world of Wall Street and end it with a gothic macabre grand guignol that has as much in common with the creepy ambiguity of Lucile Hadžihalilović’s Evolution as it does with most mainstream American cinema. There are flashes of icky Cronenbergian body horror; parallels with Park Chan-wook’s Stoker and Guillermo del Toro’s Crimson Peak, but a lack of pacing and focus defuses the meticulously styled atmosphere. However, if nothing else, Gore Verbinski’s A Cure for Wellness is the weirdest thing to come out of Hollywood in a long time.

Dane DeHaan, probably the most authentically unhealthy-looking movie star currently working, is an astute choice for the role of Lockhart, the soul-sick young executive who has traded his ethics »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


Southern Fury review – substandard kidnap caper

8 hours ago

This violent thriller has no redeeming features – and that includes Nicolas Cage’s fake nose

This needlessly violent crime thriller is an assault on the eyes. A retina-scalding palette of toxic orange and teal blue, combined with numerous ultra-slow-motion shots of spurting blood makes for a migraine in movie form. Adrian Grenier plays the upstanding businessman who must save his deadbeat older brother (Johnathon Schaech) from kidnappers.

Nicolas Cage, wearing a fake nose and a nylon wig and looking like a cross between Toni Erdmann and a homicidal mariachi band, plays the local crime boss. The only thing that is less convincing that Cage’s prosthetic schnozz is the car crash of a plot.

Continue reading »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


Bitter Harvest review – worthy account of 1930s Ukraine famine

8 hours ago

Some impressive action sequences fail to enliven this tale of an artist living in the shadow of the Stalin regime

A well-meaning but overstated drama set during the 1930s famine in Ukraine, Bitter Harvest focuses on talented artist Yuri (Max Irons) and his beloved Natalka (Samantha Barks). Separated when Yuri is imprisoned by Stalin’s oppressive regime (led by a malevolent Tamer Hassan as a local commissar) the couple must survive Holodomor, the death-by-starvation programme by which Stalin hoped to quell the Ukrainians.

The Cossack horseback action sequences are impressive, but there are too few shots of thundering hooves and too many scenes of stilted political discourse for this picture to take flight.

Continue reading »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


Sweet Dreams review – newspaper columnist’s story lost in translation

8 hours ago

Valerio Mastandrea is solid in the central role but dramatic changes of tone and pace undermine the film

Intriguing but not entirely successful, Marco Bellocchio’s attempt to bring Massimo Gramellini’s novel to the screen struggles to combine the childhood story of Gramellini and his adult life as a newspaper columnist.

The jarring tonal variations – the childhood is languidly shot in nostalgic sepia, the present day goes grittier, pacier – make this feel like two different movies hacked together. In the central role, Valerio Mastandrea, with his hollow cheeks and hungry eyes, is effective casting as a lost and wounded soul.

Continue reading »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


Moonlight shines at Film Independent Spirit awards on eve of Oscars

15 hours ago

The drama about the life of a black gay man picked up six awards, including best feature while Isabelle Huppert and Casey Affleck won lead acting prizes

Oscar-tipped drama Moonlight was the big winner at this year’s Film Independent Spirit awards, picking up six awards, including best feature.

The low-budget tale of a black gay man growing up in a deprived Miami neighborhood now holds the record for the most awards won by a single film this decade at the ceremony. Jeremy Kleiner thanked fellow producer Brad Pitt who “continues to inspire us with his curiosity and his desire for good work”.

Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


From La La Land to Jackie, women lead the way at this year’s Oscars

16 hours ago

With a high number of female-led films, critics say Hollywood has turned the corner

One person will almost certainly not be watching the global Academy Awards telecast: President Donald Trump. “I think Hollywood is known for being rather far to the left in its opinions,” offered White House press secretary Sean Spicer on Thursday by way of explanation.

But away from the wider national politics dominating the ceremony, for the 44 million Americans who are likely to tune in tonight, the event is shaping up to be a celebration of women. Film critics describe 2016 as an unusually buoyant year for women, even as much of America convulses with anxiety about gender rights under the new Trump administration.

Continue reading »

- Edward Helmore

Permalink | Report a problem


Razzies: Hillary's America and Batman v Superman tie in worst-film awards

20 hours ago

Dinesh D’Souza attack on Democrat named worst film of 2016Dc Comics blockbuster is worst ‘remake, rip-off or sequel’

Dinesh D’Souza’s documentary attack on Hillary Clinton has tied with the DC Comics blockbuster Batman v Superman for the hotly uncontested title of worst film of the year. The two movies won four Razzie awards apiece, it was announced in California on Saturday.

Related: Oscars 2017: And your bill for the evening is … $44m

Continue reading »

- Staff and agencies

Permalink | Report a problem


You be the judge: how to watch the Oscar hopefuls

22 hours ago

We trawl the streaming services for this year’s Oscar-nominated films – and two female actors neglected by the Academy

It’s the Academy Awards on 26 February, and while the Oscars’ extreme bias towards late prestige releases means you still have to head to the cinema to do most of your pre-ceremony catch-up, a handful of nominees can be accessed from your couch. I’ve already enthused about scrappy underdog best picture nominee Hell or High Water, which is available on the usual on-demand channels; ditto Captain Fantastic and Florence Foster Jenkins. Netflix can hook you up with Yorgos Lanthimos’s wicked dating satire The Lobster, a pleasingly against-the-grain screenplay nominee, and Ava DuVernay’s stirring, Bafta-winning civil rights doc 13th. Head to Curzon Home Cinema, meanwhile, to check out Tanna, a rapturously shot Vanuatuan tribal romance that is very much the dark horse in the foreign-language race, and for a mere £2.20, Gianfranco Rosi’s sparse, »

- Guy Lodge

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscars 2017: And your bill for the evening is … $44m

25 February 2017 7:00 AM, PST

From courting voters to hiring red carpet, the Academy Awards are big business. Here’s what they cost, what they earn – and how much you need to spend to help secure victory

Getting on to the podium is the first and most difficult step for any film: the competition is intense, and getting more intense by the year. To pull your film out of the swirling mass of product, first, hire a specialist Oscar campaigner. They will have contacts and strategies to get to the Academy voters and – crucially – know the rules. (Lavish party, yes; talking down other films, no). “There’s a whole culture of courting the Academy,” says veteran publicist Bumble Ward. “Academy members can go out for lunch and dinner every single day in the season. That is part of the game: who can you get in the room that will make people want to show up? »

- Andrew Pulver

Permalink | Report a problem


Everything you'll never understand about the Oscars until you've been | Hadley Freeman

25 February 2017 5:00 AM, PST

Oscars regular Hadley Freeman on why the hottest ticket in Hollywood is even more ridiculous – and wonderful – than TV makes it seem

The cliche about glitzy televised events is that they, like the celebrities, always seem diminished in real life. Movie premieres, fashion shows, the Baftas, the World Cup opening ceremony, Miss UK: I have covered them all for this paper and they look a lot better on TV than in person (yes, Miss UK really was that bad). I guess they benefit from the extra half stone that the camera puts on.

But none of this is true about the Oscars. Up close, the experience is, if anything, even more overwhelmingly ridiculous than what you see on TV.

Continue reading »

- Hadley Freeman

Permalink | Report a problem


Jodie Foster: it is our time to resist – video

25 February 2017 3:51 AM, PST

Actor Jodie Foster speaks to protesters rallying against the proposed Trump travel ban in Beverly Hills on Friday. Foster said assaults on free expression and civil liberties were the start of an attack on Democracy, adding that ‘it’s time to show up’. Speaking outside the headquarters of the United Talent Agency, Foster said all sides must come together and resist chaos and ineptitude

Jodie Foster tells Us travel ban rally: ‘It is our time to resist’

Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

Permalink | Report a problem


Salmon Oscars and five gallons of hot fudge: catering for the Academy Awards

25 February 2017 2:00 AM, PST

Celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck has the unenviable task of feeding an army of stars, guests and workers on Oscars night. He discusses shopping with 50 tractor trailers and tickling John Travolta’s tastebuds

It’s hard to move far through the shopping malls of Los Angeles without encountering the name Wolfgang Puck. The Austrian-born chef, 67, moved to California in 1975 and soon earned fame and celebrity endorsements for the à la minute cuisine he served at fine-dining joints such as Spago in Beverly Hills and the Hotel Bel-Air. His empire now encompasses a couple of dozen fine-dining restaurants, four-score Wolfgang Puck Express franchises and a line of tinned tortilla soups.

Likewise, it’s hard to move far through the film business without at some point being proffered one of his signature smoked-salmon Oscars. Puck is the official caterer for the Academy Awards and it is his creations that will line 1,500 stomachs at the 89th Governors Ball, »

- Richard Godwin

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 89 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners