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Harrison Ford to air traffic control: 'I'm the schmuck who landed on the taxiway' – audio

4 hours ago

An audio recording released by John Wayne Airport in California on Saturday reveals Harrison Ford referring to himself as a ‘schmuck’, after he mistakenly flies low over an airliner that was taxiing on 13 February. Ford had been supposed to land on a runway that runs parallel to the taxiway, but says he was distracted during landing

Harrison Ford in near-miss: ‘Was that airliner meant to be underneath me?’ Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

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Justice League: first full trailer released online

8 hours ago

The trailer for the much-hyped DC Comics superhero movie sees Batman, Wonder Woman and Aquaman join forces

The first full trailer for the much-anticipated superhero-team movie Justice League has been released onto the internet.

Directed by Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice’s Zack Snyder, Justice League has been heavily hyped as DC Comics’ answer to Marvel’s The Avengers, which provided a gateway into multiple character spin-off movies and allowed its superhero “universe” to mushroom. Justice League features the likes of Batman, Aquaman and Wonder Woman, and is due to be followed by films giving each character solo outings. Wonder Woman, released in June, stars Gal Gadot, while Aquaman should be arriving in December 2018. The Batman has been beset by well-publicised production troubles, and is not likely to start shooting until next year.

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- Guardian film

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Daniel Clowes: Trump's America is like the cynical comics I drew back in the 90s

11 hours ago

As the comic writer’s fantastically misanthropic work Wilson hits cinema screens, he talks about grief, Ghost World and surviving in Trumpland

Hey, Daniel. What was it like making a movie without Terry Zwigoff, who directed Ghost World and Art School Confidential, but isn’t in charge for Wilson?

With Terry, I was very much there the whole time in kind of a Coen brothers-ish scenario. We were bouncing ideas off each other and it felt fairly collaborative – for this one, I had decided I really had not enjoyed that process. I really like hanging out with Terry, we have fun together, but the actual process of making the movies was not at all fun for me. After the last one I thought, you know what, I’m just going to do what I do, write the script, hand it off and see what happens. My whole goal with this »

- Sam Thielman

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Chips review – woefully unfunny TV cop show reboot

16 hours ago

Dax Shepard goes for laughs in this remake of the Us highway patrol series – and fails

Director and star Dax Shepard clearly did most of his preparation for this movie reboot of the TV series in the gym. As a result, his character, rookie motorcycle cop Jon Baker, spends almost as much time posturing in his pants as his does straddling a Ducati. A staggeringly unfunny comedy, the film mines homophobia, accidental decapitation and the objectification of women for lols.

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- Wendy Ide

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Power Rangers gets 18+ rating in Russia after attacks over Lgbt character

23 hours ago

Russian distributor informed cinemas that the film would have highest possible restrictions after hardline legislator suggested it should be banned

The Russian distributor of Power Rangers has given the film an 18+ rating after criticism from several legislators who complained about the film’s inclusion of a Lgbt character.

Wdsspr, the Russian distributor of Power Rangers, informed cinemas on Friday that the film would have the highest possible age restrictions after the hardline legislator Vitaly Milonov suggested it should be banned.

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- Guardian staff

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Red Nose Day Actually review - not funny, but at least it raised money

24 March 2017 4:26 PM, PDT

Despite all the celeb cameos the charity update of Richard Curtis’s romcom was bafflingly weak. But ultimately its job wasn’t to get laughs - it was to help people

The best will in the world is what we all have for Red Nose Day — and for Richard Curtis’s monumental effort over decades in helping to make it a great national instutition. I’m very happy to have got my debit card out on the night, like so many others. The convention is that you cheerfully overlook some of the gags that don’t come off on account of the wacky gang-show spirit and live-tv hijinks and because it’s all in a good cause. But the awful truth is that Red Nose Day Actually, the much-trumpeted special featurette update of Curtis’s 2003 romcom box office smash, really was bafflingly weak.

Related: Behind the scenes of Comic Relief »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Love Actually, again: Hugh Grant dances to Hotline Bling for Red Nose Day – video

24 March 2017 3:08 PM, PDT

The cast of Love Actually reassembled for a one-off sequel in aid of charity event Red Nose Day on Friday, 13 years after the much-loved film was released. Hugh Grant returns as David, the UK’s principled prime minister, and reenacts his iconic scene dancing down the Downing Street stairs - only this time, Drake’s smash hit Hotline Bling is his tune of choice

You can donate via the Red Nose Day website by clicking here, or text Yes to 70210 to give £10

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- Guardian Staff

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Original Ghost in the Shell director: 'no basis' for whitewashing anger

24 March 2017 11:10 AM, PDT

Mamoru Oshii says he has no issue with casting of Scarlett Johansson since character is a cyborg and despite her name, ‘her physical form is an assumed one’

The director of the original Ghost in the Shell, Mamoru Oshii, has weighed in on the whitewashing controversy surrounding the remake, saying that there is no basis for the criticism leveled at the decision to cast Scarlett Johansson in the lead role rather than an Asian actor.

Related: Worse than a whitewash: has Ghost in the Shell been Hollywoodised?

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- Guardian staff

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Shia Labeouf’s Trump art project shut down one day after moving to Liverpool

24 March 2017 10:20 AM, PDT

He Will Not Divide Us is curtailed on police advice after reports of ‘dangerous trespassing’, with alt-right group thought to be involved

He Will Not Divide Us, Shia Labeouf’s artistic protest against the Trump presidency, has been shut down again, just one day after moving to its latest location in Liverpool.

On Wednesday. the city’s Foundation for Art and Creative Technology (Fact) centre announced that they would be displaying the project, which currently takes the form of a live stream of a white flag featuring the words: “He will not divide us.” The announcement came after the actor’s artistic group Labeouf, Rönkkö & Turner said that it was not safe to display the artwork in the Us.

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- Gwilym Mumford

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How the Power Rangers reboot morphed into a surprising triumph

24 March 2017 9:35 AM, PDT

Marquee superheroes such as Batman are failing on the big screen. So how can a film based on a trashy TV show soar despite its bargain basement origins?

Superheroes often come from humble origins. Peter Parker was a simple high school geek before a bite from a radioactive spider transformed him into Spider-Man. Captain America was a scrawny weakling who became the ultimate warrior after being injected with a super-serum. The classic origins tale for Wonder Woman, perhaps the most famous female superhero in DC’s grand pantheon of costumed crimefighters, is that she was sculpted from clay by her mother, Queen Hippolyta, and given life by the Greek goddess Athena.

Related: Kiss of the Spider-Man: what will a Venom movie actually look like?

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- Ben Child

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Star Wars spin-off will reveal how Han Solo got his name

24 March 2017 8:00 AM, PDT

Disney CEO Bob Iger says that film will also feature first meeting between character and Chewbacca, and divulges details about the franchise’s future

It is legendary throughout Star Wars’s galaxy far, far away, but it seems that Han Solo’s name may not be his real one.

According to Disney CEO Bob Iger, the forthcoming Han Solo prequel will reveal how Harrison Ford’s space smuggler acquired his name – suggesting that it hasn’t been with him from birth.

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- Guardian film

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Jake Gyllenhaal to play anarchist joining the fight against Isis

24 March 2017 3:28 AM, PDT

Daniel Espinosa will direct film based on the real-life story about a band of American radicals who are taking on the Islamic State in Syria

Jake Gyllenhaal is to star in a drama about an American who joins the fight against Islamic State in Syria.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, the film, an adaptation of Seth Harp’s Rolling Stone article The Anarchists vs the Islamic State, will see the actor reunite with director Daniel Espinosa, with whom he recently worked on sci-fi horror movie Life. Gyllenhaal will produce the film via his production company Nine Stories.

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- Gwilym Mumford

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Another Mother's Son review – moving drama on a forgotten occupation

24 March 2017 2:00 AM, PDT

Jenny Seagrove excels in this true-life tale of a mother who hides a fugitive Russian in the Channel Islands during the second world war

At first, there is a bit of a familiar taste to this true-life wartime tale. But it becomes something tougher. The film is, moreover, an interesting reminder of something that the British prefer to overlook assomething it doesn’t quite fit into the Churchillian narrative of never surrendering: the Nazi occupation of British territory – the Channel Islands. It wasn’t just the French who suffered the misery of occupation, and the sordid nightmare of people pursuing petty grudges with anonymous letters to the Nazi authorities. Jenny Seagrove gives a fierce and capable performance as Louisa Gould, a Jersey woman who hid a fugitive Russian slave-worker, nicknamed Bill (Julian Kostov). John Hannah, Nicholas Farrell and – unexpectedly – Ronan Keating take supporting roles as islanders. The film persuasively suggests »

- Peter Bradshaw

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The Age of Shadows review – handsome 1920s double-agent spy drama

24 March 2017 1:30 AM, PDT

Set in Japanese-occupied Korea, Kim Jee-woon’s violent tale delivers bang for its buck in the form of brash action sequences and a chase on a train

Anticipation is high for Park Chan-wook’s forthcoming The Handmaiden, set in the early years of the 20th century, the era of the Japanese occupation of Korea. So, as it happens, is this lavishly produced movie from director Kim Jee-woon: it’s a handsome double-agent spy drama, based on a true story, which was South Korea’s entry for this year’s Oscars. Song Kang-ho (a virtually iconic presence in Korean cinema, with appearances in movies from Memories of Murder to Snowpiercer) is police captain Lee Jung-Chool, a Korean national working for the 1920s Japanese occupier, but with boyhood links to resistance fighters … and lingering sympathies. He infiltrates the insurgents as they travel to China to buy explosives from a European anarchist cell. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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CHiPs review – timid, off-colour cops-on-bikes remake

24 March 2017 1:00 AM, PDT

This comic-ironic remake of the old TV show never quite thrums into life, and contains a few horribly misjudged moments

Here comes yet another addition to the “ironic film remake of a beloved 70s/80s TV series” genre, which is starting to look as dated as the shows it purports to send up. Updating of the cops-on-bikes action drama of the same name, ChiPs stars Michael Peña in the old Erik Estrada role of Ponch, a sex-addicted FBI agent who is tasked with rooting out police corruption by going undercover in the California highway patrol unit. There he’s paired up with idiot-savant rookie Jon Baker (Dax Shepard, also the film’s director), whose guilelessness is counterbalanced by a remarkable gift for riding motorbikes. Soon the pair are on the trail of a dirty cop (Vincent D’Onofrio, entirely wasted in a gruff, underdeveloped role), bickering and blowing stuff up as they go. »

- Gwilym Mumford

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Rotten Tomatoes: is the semi-fresh aggregation site really destroying cinema? | Peter Bradshaw

23 March 2017 11:32 PM, PDT

Batman v Superman producer Brett Ratner is right to address the site’s dumbing down of film criticism, but his negative review is also a case of sour grapes

Brett Ratner is right. Sort of. The director of the Rush Hour films and the producer of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice has launched a passionate denunciation of the movie review aggregation site Rotten Tomatoes. I’m giving his attack a “semi-fresh” rating.

Ratner says: “The worst thing that we have in today’s movie culture is Rotten Tomatoes. I think it’s the destruction of our business.” Well I don’t know about that, but it’s certainly hurting the art of conversing about film. Whenever someone solemnly invokes a Rotten Tomatoes score you can feel the conversation become paralysed.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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The Handmaid’s Tale: Elisabeth Moss stars in disturbing first full trailer – video

23 March 2017 9:36 PM, PDT

The brutality of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel The Handmaid’s Tale is brought to life in a film starring Elizabeth Moss, released in the Us on 26 April. Moss plays Offred, who narrates life from the dystopian totalitarian future in the country of Gilead, where women are imprisoned and forced to procreate for the ruling male elite and their infertile wives

Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

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'I'm bummed': Amy Schumer pulls out of live-action Barbie movie

23 March 2017 6:34 PM, PDT

Actor blames scheduling conflicts for her withdrawal from film that has already been through a range of shake-ups

Amy Schumer has pulled out of the title role of Sony’s upcoming live-action Barbie film, citing “scheduling conflicts”.

The actor and comedian was announced as the film’s star in December last year. She and her sister, Kim Caramele, would also be contributing a partial rewrite of the script.

Continue reading »

- Steph Harmon

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The Hatton Garden movies: how the British crime film lost its bottle

23 March 2017 11:38 AM, PDT

Upcoming films based on the jewellery burglary give us caricatured old-school villains and semi-fictional nostalgia – the perfect fit for Brexit Britain

Sometimes, a film arrives at exactly the right time. In Brexitland 2017, that film is The Hatton Garden Job, a nostalgia-rich and semi-fictional crime caper loosely based on the case also known as the Hatton Garden safe-deposit burglary. The turnaround has been quick. You will remember the Easter weekend two years ago, when parties unknown drilled through 18in of concrete under central London to steal £14m worth of gold, cash and jewellery. And how, when arrests were finally made, the movie pitched itself – the principal gang members aged between 60 and 76, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel with a swag bag.

The gift kept giving. The heist involved no violence, granting the story family-friendliness. Then there was “Basil” – the unknown security expert who remains at large with his share of the proceeds, »

- Danny Leigh

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All This Panic review – shrewd but claustrophobic teen-life doc

23 March 2017 11:30 AM, PDT

The film about a group of young New York City teenagers might not tell you all that much that is truly revelatory, but it’s well made and wide-ranging

There’s a symphony of uptalk and a chorus of vocal fry in this documentary about a group of teenage girls growing up in New York City, and also a small but distinct drawl of entitlement. It’s a film with a shrewd, ambient sense of atmosphere, tonally controlled and well shaped in the edit. It may not tell you that much – or perhaps anything – new. But the girls’ personalities come across with great clarity. Each is introduced with a first name flashed up in big sans serif lettering, the film’s one obvious stylistic indulgence, and maybe even a nod to Wes Anderson: one participant rather knowingly references Margot Tenenbaum, Gwyneth Paltrow’s character from The Royal Tenenbaums. They hang out with each other, »

- Peter Bradshaw

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