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Spectre song: Sam Smith tips Ellie Goulding for new James Bond theme

11 hours ago

Former bookmakers’ favourite rules himself out of the running for Spectre, the 24th official 007 film

Singer Sam Smith has denied reports suggesting he will perform the theme tune for the new James Bond movie, Spectre, tipping Ellie Goulding to instead get the call from 007.

Appearing on Capital FM radio, Smith ruled himself out of the running to follow in the footsteps of luminaries such as Tom Jones, Shirley Bassey and Nancy Sinatra on the 24th official Bond movie.

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- Ben Child

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Inside Out by Emma Brockes

11 hours ago

With its jokes about abstract thought, this Pixar/Disney journey inside an 11-year-old’s mind is as funny as it is inventive

The precursor to the movie Inside Out, as any 1980s reader of the Beano will know, was a comic strip called the Numskulls, in which a group of tiny operatives ran around inside a boy’s brain, pulling the levers that governed his five senses, with hilarious results. In the Pixar/Disney version, the jokes are more sophisticated and the brain workers hung up on more existential concerns, but the idea is roughly the same: a portrait of the inside of 11-year-old Riley’s mind, where central command is run by five warring emotions – Amy Poehler as Joy, Lewis Black as Anger, Mindy Kaling as Disgust, Bill Hader as Fear and Phyllis Smith as Sadness.

Sadness is fat, with large glasses and an unfortunate rollneck sweater, and every »

- Emma Brockes

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Cinemagoer self-diagnoses illness after watching Stephen Hawking biopic

11 hours ago

Paul Whyley is receiving treatment for motor neurone disease after experiencing an epiphany during screening of Oscar-winning film The Theory of Everything

A moviegoer has told how he correctly diagnosed himself with motor neurone disease after watching the Oscar-winning Stephen Hawking biopic The Theory of Everything.

Paul Whyley, 62, a grandfather and former newspaper circulation rep from Hagley in the west midlands, is now being looked after full time by his wife Jayne after doctors agreed his symptoms were unmistakable.

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- Ben Child

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Batman v Superman: five surprises we've learned this week

12 hours ago

A mech-suited Batman, Wonder Woman without her tiara and Lex Luthor with the barnet of a 1990s footballer are among the shocks revealed in new shots from the Dawn of Justice set

Entertainment Weekly has published an array of official on-set shots from Zack Snyder’s Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, featuring Ben Affleck as Batman, Henry Cavill as Superman and Israeli actor Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman. So what do they tell us? Here’s a handful of superhero sleights of hand we did not quite see coming.

Related: Will Batman breathe life into Suicide Squad or just kill our buzz?

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- Ben Child

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The Guardian film show live: Amy, Terminator Genisys, Magic Mike Xxl and Orson Welles – video reviews

14 hours ago

This special live edition of the Guardian film show comes from the Prince Charles cinema in London, where our critics review Arnie's comeback, Terminator Genisys, male-stripping soap Magic Mike Xxl, Orson Welles documentary Magician and Amy, the documentary about the late singer Amy Winehouse. Plus, Amy's director Asif Kapadia and producer, James Gay-Rees are interviewed, as is cinematographer Phil Méheux, who speaks about the restoration of 1980 crime classic The Long Good Friday Continue reading »

- Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw, Catherine Shoard and Dan Susman

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Amy, Terminator Genisys, Magic Mike Xxl: this week’s new films

14 hours ago

All American High Revisited | Still The Water | The First Film | Comet | Housebound | Magician: The Astonishing Life And Work Of Orson Welles

We all know how Amy Winehouse’s story goes, and this documentary puts you right in it, through a combination of key-witness oral history and rigorously sourced archive images – the same technique Kapadia deployed with Senna. Perhaps as a result of this reliance on existing material, the film dwells far longer on the fall than the rise. Viewers get a sense of Winehouse’s promise and personality during the early years, but are then uncomfortably aligned with the paparazzi in spectating her tragic, protracted demise.

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- Steve Rose

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This week’s new film events

14 hours ago

Manchester Film Festival | Station To Station | London On Film | Brazilica Film Festival

Hoping to become the film festival the city deserves (and not to be confused with Manchester international festival), this inaugural event has a modestly budgeted selection, but one that consists of films you won’t find elsewhere. Some are even world premieres, like Many Beautiful Things, a docudrama about Victorian artist Lilias Trotter (played by Downton’s Michelle Dockery). In terms of British talent there’s Two Down, a black comedy involving a London hitman, plus shorts starring the likes of Frankie Boyle and Ricky Tomlinson.

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- Steve Rose

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Frozen effect: Elsa breaks into top 500 baby names

15 hours ago

After the release of the hit Disney animation, the name of its most popular character sparked a surge in real-life children’s names

The name Elsa has rocketed in popularity for Us newborns, according to records collated by the Social Security Administration, and the numbers of children being given the name is at its highest level as far back as the Ssa’s data is available.

As reported by the New York Times, this surge in popularity is undoubtedly due to the enormously successful Disney animation Frozen, which was released in the Us in November 2013. As a result, 2014 saw 1131 girls given the name, landing at number 286 in the popularity list – up from 528 the year before.

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- Andrew Pulver

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Faith of Our Fathers review – hard to keep the faith in PureFlix's worst film yet

15 hours ago

If the ‘faith and family’ film-makers’ task is to proselytize, they are doing a wretched job with these cheap, risible films

If you just can’t wait for that first Republican primary debate to get some vague talking points about duty, honor and the healing power of Christ’s love inarticulately blurted in your face, have I got the movie for you! PureFlix Entertainment, the Arizona-based purveyor of (per their subscription-based streaming website) “faith and family movies” that hit big with God’s Not Dead, has followed up the recent Old Fashioned and Do You Believe? with their worst movie yet. At least the others had ludicrous storylines worthy of ridicule. This one is just plain boring.

It’s 1997, and California-based nice guy John Paul George (Kevin Downes) is readying to marry his longtime girlfriend whose sole ambition in life is the preparation of home-cooked meals. John Paul’s mother recently passed and, »

- Jordan Hoffman

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Don't look away now: the crucial movie moments you can't afford to miss

15 hours ago

A phone call meant I wasn’t present for Jurassic World’s important foreshadowed Gm-shark. So what other pivotal scenes in potential masterpieces have trips to the loo led me to overlook?

This article contains spoilers about Jurassic World, Ida, Spartacus, Jaws and Braveheart

Jurassic World concludes with an epic, mano-a-mano free-for-all between two genetically-modified dinosaurs that do not seem to like each other. The outcome of the tussle is still very much in doubt when something totally unexpected occurs: the proverbial deus ex machina appears out of nowhere and brings the battle royale to a surprising conclusion. And that’s that.

I found this finale so jarring and unexpected that I complained about it to my friend as we left the theatre. I felt like I’d been played.

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- Joe Queenan

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Arnold Schwarzenegger: five best moments

16 hours ago

Highlights from the action-packed and dialogue-light career of the bodybuilder turned actor turned governor turned actor

Ridicule his abilities as you wish but Arnold Schwarzenegger’s films have made over $4bn worldwide over a 30 year period, making him one of the most successful actors of all time.

And while this might have less to do with his impeccably emotive line delivery and more to do with his hulking physical presence, he’s sustained a surprisingly varied career nonetheless. This week he returns to play his most iconic role in Terminator Genisys and, since it’s not going down as one of his greatest films, here’s what we’d pick instead.

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- Benjamin Lee

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Gaspar Noé's 3D sex film Love gets a 16 rating in France amid controversy

17 hours ago

The French ratings board has ignored the advice of culture minister Fleur Pellerin who recommended a stronger rating for the explicit drama

Gaspar Noé’s controversial new film Love has been given a 16 rating in France, despite a recommendation that it should receive a higher certificate.

Related: Love review: Gaspar Noé's hardcore 3D sex movie is fifty shades of vanilla

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- Benjamin Lee

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Steve Wozniak on Steve Jobs movie: 'Accuracy second to entertainment'

18 hours ago

Tech pioneer says he doesn’t recognise himself in Seth Rogen’s performance, but admits parts of the trailer for Danny Boyle’s Apple drama made him cry

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has revealed he feels torn about the new trailer for Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs, in which Michael Fassbender and Seth Rogen star as a tyrannical take on the late tech guru and a fiercely critical version of Wozniak himself.

“What do you do? You’re not an engineer,” says the screen Wozniak. “You’re not a designer. You can’t put a hammer to a nail. I built the circuit board. The graphical interface was stolen. So how come, 10 times in a day, I read Steve Jobs is a genius? What do you do?”

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- Ben Child

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The Legend of Barney Thomson: watch an exclusive clip from Robert Carlyle's directing debut – video

18 hours ago

Full Monty and Trainspotting star Robert Carlyle has made his feature-film directing debut with The Legend of Barney Thomson, about a Glaswegian barber caught up in a string of gruesome murders. Carlyle also stars, alongside Ray Winstone as an angry copper and Emma Thompson, who undergoes a dramatic transformation to play Barney's elderly, foulmouthed mother Cemolina.

Warning: This clip contains explicit language

The Legend of Barney Thomson is released in the UK on 24 July Continue reading »

- Guardian Staff

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Comet review – phoney-baloney sci-fi indie romcom

2 July 2015 2:55 PM, PDT

One-dimensional La guy meets kooky one-dimensional gal during a meteor shower, enabling a parallel-time relationship in this laborious, futile film

A sense of laborious, futile strain comes off this phoney-baloney indie, which looks and sounds very much like an attempt to fashion a more amenable (and thereby saleable) version of Shane Carruth’s puzzle pictures. Nerdy La guy (Justin Long) meets kooky Deschanel type (Emmy Rossum) amid a meteor shower that cues cutaways to this relationship’s progression across parallel universes; out of this rip in the space-time continuum, there tumbles a lot of gabbily self-conscious dialogue, and characters who – wherever they are, whatever they’re doing – remain stubbornly monodimensional. Ninety minutes in a branch of Comet would throw up greater insight into the human condition.

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- Mike McCahill

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La Grande Bouffe review – a fabulous feast of desire and disgust

2 July 2015 2:45 PM, PDT

Jaded, crass and drenched in ennui, Marco Ferreri’s perverted nightmare of seedy 1970s sophistications may be a film of its time: but what a time

Of no film was it more rightly said: they don’t make them like that any more. Marco Ferreri’s La Grande Bouffe, from 1973 (or Blow-Out, to use its explosive English title) is on re-release. Jaded, authentically perverted, drenched in ennui, this absurdist nightmare is a locus classicus of 1970s chateau erotica. In all its seedy sophistication and degraded hedonism, it focuses not on desire but disgust. The nearest immediate comparison is possibly that episode of the Simpsons where Homer challenges trucker Red Barclay to a steak-eating contest which turns out to be fatal. There is also something here of Rabelais, De Sade and the surrealist Raymond Roussel, who believed in the subversive potential of eating the courses of a meal in the wrong order. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles review

2 July 2015 2:30 PM, PDT

Chuck Workman’s documentary takes us through Welles’s early glory and disappointing long goodbye, making the case for some of his best forgotten films

Related: When Orson met Larry: 'Welles was a very bad boy. But he was a great artist'

Like every other book or film about the genius of Orson Welles, the narrative arc of Chuck Workman’s documentary takes us through glory, excitement and a long goodbye of disappointment. Welles revolutionised theatre, radio and the cinema. Yet still he is thought of as some kind of loser, perhaps because his movie masterpiece Citizen Kane came at the beginning of his career – rather than, say, two-thirds of the way through. Welles had a bad and exasperating habit of leaving his filmed artworks unfinished: a habit he shared with Franz Kafka, whose The Trial Welles very stylishly brought to the screen. It resulted in chaos, acrimony and a »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Housebound review – horror-comedy that works as both

2 July 2015 2:20 PM, PDT

Clever low-budget Kiwi indie thriller about a scowling teen under house arrest, whose house is ‘disturbed’ – but what, or who, by?

This low-budget Kiwi offering is a rare thing: a horror-comedy with a premise that works both ways. After dynamiting a cashpoint, scowling Kylie (Morgana O’Reilly) is placed under house arrest in the home of her micromanaging mother Miriam (Rima Te Wiata); the twist is that this house is – as mum puts it – “prone to certain disturbances”. While we’re waiting for the cause to reveal itself, writer-director-editor Gerard Johnstone gains comic mileage from Kylie’s sullen interactions with those around her, and burrows inventively around his initial, Disturbia-like setup: a ghost story is thus converted into first a hider-in-the-house thriller, then a murder-mystery. Peter Jackson aficionados may recall the overbearing matriarch of 1992’s Braindead, although Te Wiata makes Miriam’s incessant waffling heroic, and the tactics are closer »

- Mike McCahill

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Terminator: Genisys review – Arnie's back, in a cynical franchisebot

2 July 2015 2:00 PM, PDT

Like a grumpy old retainer, Schwarzenegger lumbers through a witless, pointless, back-to-the-beginning exercise that’s entirely lacking in ingenuity or humour

Here is the intensely unnecessary back-to-the-beginning-with-a-twist Terminator movie: it’s as if it has gone back in time to murder our memories of the ancestral first film and crush the series’ reputation. As well as many other fantastically irritating things, they have rebooted the spelling of “genesis”. The old spelling of “genesis” is an orthographic franchise which has been reinvigorated. They’ve reimagined it. They’ve upgraded it. It’s left me in a state of paralisys. It’s crushing every brain synapsys. This is a personal crisys and I may need analisys, and the basys of all this is that Terminator Genisys is the antithisys of enjoyable.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Life's a Beach review – affectionate and elegantly brisk

2 July 2015 1:45 PM, PDT

A picture-perfect documentary detailing a threat to the idyll of an English eccentric

This affectionate, accessible and elegantly brisk documentary follows loveable English eccentric Jerry “Mungo” Francis, who until recently lived year-round on a beach, a dream many of have probably had at one point or another but lacked the gumption to pursue. Although he effectively existed off the grid, inhabiting a set of makeshift shelters on Folkestone beach that consists of a dilapidated cottage, an old dry-docked boat and some tents, his lifestyle wasn’t entirely without amenities thanks to a jerry-rigged generator, foraged fresh water, and internet access. For company, there’s a lazy Jack Russell bitch who whelps an adorable puppy at one point, some chickens, and many friends and family who drop by to help him out. It would all have been utterly idyllic if National Rail, who claimed they owned the land he was living on, »

- Leslie Felperin

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