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Amber Heard granted restraining order against husband Johnny Depp

4 hours ago

A judge ordered Depp to stay away from his estranged wife, who filed for divorce on Monday and accused the actor of repeatedly physically assaulting her

A Los Angeles judge has granted a restraining order against Johnny Depp from his estranged wife Amber Heard, who has accused him of domestic violence, court documents show.

The documents, filed on Friday by lawyers representing Heard, state that Depp “violently attacked” Heard on Saturday night in their penthouse apartment.

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- Nicky Woolf in Los Angeles

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Arabian Nights: satire meets Scheherazade in epic Portuguese trilogy

6 hours ago

Miguel Gomes explores his country’s austerity years via myth and dick jokes

While the giants of the streaming world duke it out over Ashton Kutcher sitcoms and Top Gear rehashes, Mubi is singlehandedly realising the potential that subscription services have to push viewers beyond their comfort zones. Alongside its usual roster of arthouse favourites and Hollywood oddities, the platform has had exclusive online premieres for a Paul Thomas Anderson documentary, a key work of the contemporary Canadian avant garde (88.88), and now Arabian Nights, the acclaimed three-volume opus from Portugal’s Miguel Gomes.

Related: Arabian Nights Vol 1: The Restless One review – resistance through filmic poetry

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- Charlie Lyne

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Melissa McCarthy: ‘I love a woman who doesn't play by the rules’

6 hours ago

Bridesmaids made her one of the world’s most highly paid actresses. Now she’s taking over from the men in Ghostbusters

There are a couple of rules Hollywood studios have when it comes to making blockbuster movies these days, rules that are as absurd as they are well-established:

1. Audiences don’t want to see a comedy with a female lead.

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- Hadley Freeman

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Finding Dory trailer raises hopes film could include lesbian couple

9 hours ago

Scene depicting two women caring for a toddler who is knocked out of her pram sparks speculation

A newly released trailer for the Finding Nemo sequel has prompted speculation that the animated film could be Disney Pixar’s first to include a lesbian couple.

The trailer for Finding Dory, the sequel to the 2003 blockbuster about the adventures of a clown fish, debuted on the Ellen Show last week.

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- Bonnie Malkin

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Andrew Davies: my Les Misérables will be nothing like 'shoddy farrago' musical

16 hours ago

Speaking at Hay festival, veteran writer, who adapted War & Peace for the BBC, said Victor Hugo’s novel needs a champion

Andrew Davies’s next historical novel adaptation for the BBC will be Victor Hugo’s Les Misérables – but nothing like the “shoddy farrago” of the musical.

The adapter of Pride and Prejudice, Middlemarch and most recently War & Peace gave his frank opinion of the stage and film musical to an audience at the second day of the Hay Festival.

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- Mark Brown

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Holy Hell review – first-person footage blurs line between community and cult

19 hours ago

Film’s unrivaled access takes us inside the inner workings of a cult as never before to reveal a group that’s far more complex than you might expect

Part of becoming an adult means making a poor choice here and there. For the lucky ones, a pot of black coffee and a jog can sweat these out the morning after. For others there are lingering effects. When Will Allen started hanging out with a group of friendly and fit young people in California, he found a group of likeminded, artistic and philosophical peers looking for answers to big questions. He emerged 22 years later questioning his choice to devote his time, finances and energy to the group’s leader. Allen wasn’t the first to fall under the spell of a cult, nor will he be the last, but his position as in-house videographer may make him the only one »

- Jordan Hoffman

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Paul Verhoeven on Elle: 'It is not a rape comedy'

21 hours ago

No female actor in Hollywood would touch it. But the director’s perverse black comedy starring Isabelle Huppert was the toast of Cannes. The controversial film-maker talks about his most daring work yet

Related: Isabelle Huppert: Elle is not about a woman 'accepting her rapist'

Paul Verhoeven is not worried. If anything, he’s jubilant. His new film Elle, the first full-length feature he’s directed in 10 years, has just premiered at Cannes to feverish acclaim. It’s being called one of his best and suddenly he’s the Croisette comeback king. But the film itself is a problematic concoction: a staggeringly perverted black comedy about a woman’s unconventional response to being raped that pulls in elements of sadomasochism, voyeurism, spousal violence and adultery – but smattered with genuine, riotous laughter.

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- Benjamin Lee

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Cristian Mungiu on Graduation: 'We need a collective solution for Romanian society' - video interview

27 May 2016 7:21 AM, PDT

Cristian Mungiu, the director of 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days and Beyond the Hills talks to Nigel M Smith about his new film, Graduation, which premiered in Cannes last week. He explains how the endemic corruption of his home country inspired him to make a film about a father’s fight to get his daughter to access to education in the UK

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- Nigel M Smith and Henry Barnes

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George Clooney: five best moments

27 May 2016 7:17 AM, PDT

The Oscar-winner reunites with Julia Roberts for his financial thriller Money Monster but what have been his greatest on-screen roles?

While Ben Affleck was understandably gloomy over the recent reception of Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, all is not lost. His buddy George Clooney turned his failed turn as the Caped Crusader into a surprisingly diverse career of critical hits, both in front of and behind the camera.

Related: Money Monster review - George Clooney goes Leslie Nielsen in popcorn hostage thriller

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- Benjamin Lee

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Holy Hell and the truth about cults: 'They’re not going to give it up easily'

27 May 2016 7:17 AM, PDT

A new film follows the Buddhafield group of the 80s and director Will Allen – who was in the group – talks about how easy it is to get caught up in cults

Perhaps the most disturbing part of Holy Hell – the documentary which premiered at Sundance earlier this year and is about a West Hollywood cult – is that life in the group doesn’t look that bad at all. Beautiful young people dance around in pastoral scenes, while an aviator-wearing leader expands their minds by seemingly doing little more than having a very good time.

Holy Hell director Will Allen joined the Buddhafield in the 80s. His film – made up of videos he shot while in the group – raises accusations that over two decades he, and other members of the group, were sexually abused by the cult leader, who now goes by the name of Andreas but was also known as Michel. »

- Noah Berlatsky

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A gay superhero? Yes please! Just not Captain America

27 May 2016 3:57 AM, PDT

Shock tactics would send a message about studios’ willingness to catch up with society – but there are better candidates than Steve Rogers

Would it make all that much difference if Captain America were gay? A gay Iron Man, now, given Tony Stark’s penchant for making lewd comments in the Marvel movies, would have made for a spikier shift in dynamics. A gay Hulk might have been read as homophobia, particularly if alter ego Bruce Banner remained straight. A gay Black Widow would have fed into stereotypes about physically adept women.

But a gay Captain America? Would anyone even notice?

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- Ben Child

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The Dardenne brothers: 'Attacks on Obama to democratise healthcare are pathetic' – video interview

27 May 2016 2:56 AM, PDT

Jean-Paul and Luc Dardenne, the Belgian siblings who have twice won the Palme d’Or, speak in Cannes about their new film. The Unknown Girl is the story of a young female doctor trying to discover the identity – and the killer – of a woman found dead outside her medical practice. They discuss why they are drawn to stories of female empowerment and gender equality and how they think the film might be received in countries such as the Us, where the fight for universal healthcare continues.

• The Unknown Girl premiered at Cannes and will be released later this year

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- Nigel M Smith, Jonross Swaby and Paula Erizanu

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Colin Firth to star in Russian submarine disaster film Kursk

27 May 2016 2:33 AM, PDT

Thomas Vinterberg’s adaptation of the 2002 book A Time to Die will tell story of torpedo explosion aboard ‘the pride of the Russian navy’ that killed all 118 crew

Oscar winner Colin Firth is reportedly to star in the submarine disaster movie Kursk for Far from the Madding Crowd’s Thomas Vinterberg, Variety reports.

Related: How Colin Firth burst my Cannes bubble | Peter Bradshaw

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- Ben Child

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Paul Schrader and Willem Dafoe: 'We thought we should really do the nasty'

27 May 2016 12:56 AM, PDT

Schrader and Dafoe – who plays psychotic criminal Mad Dog – discuss the director’s latest film, Dog Eat Dog, a bad-taste epic for the ‘post-rules generation’

Deep in the filth, squashed under the weight of the American dream, three men with crazy names (Troy, Mad Dog and Diesel) scrabble for space. Try as they might, the gangsters at the heart of Paul Schrader’s latest are damned. Down they go, still clinging to the hope of one last, redemptive job, digging on deep to the gates of hell.

Dog Eat Dog, which was let off the leash at last week’s Cannes film festival, is a hard-scrap story. Based on the book by former criminal, writer and actor Eddie Bunker (who played Reservoir Dogs’s Mr Blue), it’s set and shot among the strip malls and dive bars of post-crash Cleveland. Nicolas Cage stars as Troy, a once-wealthy heir whose fortunes have crumbled. »

- Henry Barnes

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Alice Through the Looking Glass review – large as life and twice as phoney

26 May 2016 3:00 PM, PDT

Helena Bonham Carter has fun as the Red Queen, but this ignores Lewis Carroll in favour of machine-tooled CGI fantasy fare with a tiresome Johnny Depp

A boisterous turn from Helena Bonham Carter as the pugnacious Red Queen saves this Alice sequel from flatlining utterly. Using only the title and some characters from Lewis Carroll’s own 1871 sequel – in fact called Through the Looking Glass, and What Alice Found There – this new movie is just machine-tooled CGI fantasy fare. We start in the real world, where Alice (Mia Wasikowska) is a daring sea captain who is threatened with betrayal by the corporate landlubbers who own her ship. So she escapes through a mirror in the proprietor’s mansion and finds herself slap bang in Wonderland again.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Top Cat Begins review – tiptop tat

26 May 2016 2:45 PM, PDT

This new puss prequel is very much on a par with the standard of the first film

[Big band TV sig intro – but slower and gloomier than usual.]

Top Cat! Now, I just want to plead:

“Stop that!” The first film made us

bleed

Wounds of horror stabbed in our

brain!

Now we have to watch the same

thing again ...?

Not that! Look, I’m quite ser–i–ous,

Avoid this prequel please.

Top Cat 2’s frankly poo and it’s

coming at you

You must avoid this film and –

that’s that.

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- Peter Bradshaw

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Close Encounters of the Third Kind review – a must-watch director's cut

26 May 2016 2:25 PM, PDT

Steven Spielberg’s sci-fi masterpiece may be the nearest thing he created to an old-fashioned epic

Is it really almost 40 years old? Watching this gem again in the director’s cut – it is also a very rare actual screenwriting credit for Spielberg – makes you realise that it may be the nearest thing he created to an old-fashioned epic, and that maybe the vision of Devil’s Tower in Wyoming was a Spielbergisation of John Ford.

Related: Joss Whedon: the film that changed my life

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- Peter Bradshaw

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A Beautiful Planet review – vivid earthly phenonema and zero-gravity haircare

26 May 2016 2:15 PM, PDT

Imax galaxy quest reveals life in orbit and a breathtaking perspective on our planet’s landmasses, with a little over-earnest narration by Jennifer Lawrence

With such Imax credits as writer of Mission to Mir and director of Hubble 3D to her name, Toni Myers is doing as much as any film-maker to map the galaxy’s outer reaches. Her latest large-format eye-opener achieves a breathtaking new perspective on Earthly life by floating cameras among astronauts aboard the International Space Station (Iss). Tim Peake’s Twitter feed: mere dilettantism in comparison. 

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- Mike McCahill

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The Trust review – offbeat thriller is a criminal waste of talent

26 May 2016 2:00 PM, PDT

Nicolas Cage throws in the odd burst of goofiness but this heist movie never settles into a groove and there’s not nearly enough tension or consistency

If you’re telling a story involving buddy cops, Las Vegas and a heist, you’d better have something new to bring to the party, but this potentially offbeat thriller relies too heavily on its lead actors: Nicolas Cage and Elijah Wood. They’re set on breaking into a criminal strongroom they’ve located – with no clear idea what’s inside. It’s a tough job involving kidnap, German power tools and several hours of drilling from the apartment above. In time-honoured fashion, the well-laid plan goes awry, but the story never settles into a comfortable groove. Once in a while Nicolas Cage remembers he’s Nicolas Cage and throws in an offbeat line delivery or an incongruous burst of goofiness, but »

- Steve Rose

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Bobby review – route one documentary about East End gent Bobby Moore

26 May 2016 1:45 PM, PDT

It’s might be less than cinematic, but who could begrudge the World Cup-winning England captain his own adulatory documentary?

If you can bear another blow-by-blow account of English football’s finest hour, this is as good a time as any, and nobody could begrudge Bobby Moore his documentary closeup. In film-making terms, it’s very much route one: archive clips, talking heads, nothing fancy. And being a defender, Moore’s heroics are inherently less cinematic than, say, a Pelé or Cristiano Ronaldo. But if there’s any evidence Moore was ever less than a cool-headed leader on the pitch and an East End gent off it, this adulatory doc doesn’t find it. It does, at least, acknowledge his later problems: insomnia, depression, bankruptcy, cancer and, perhaps most painful of all, cruel rejection by the football establishment, which saw him reduced to managing non-league clubs and commentating on local radio. »

- Steve Rose

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