Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 52 items   « Prev | Next »


Sophie Okonedo: ‘My body is my barometer – my instincts are physical’

4 hours ago

The celebrated actor on her new play with Damian Lewis, why performing is an adventure, and leaving London for the country

Sophie Okonedo was born in 1968 in London and studied at Rada. She has worked extensively across theatre, film and TV and was nominated for a best supporting actress Oscar for the 2004 film Hotel Rwanda. On Broadway, she won a Tony award in 2014 for A Raisin in the Sun and two years later was nominated for her performance in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. Her TV credits include The Slap, Undercover and The Hollow Crown. She is currently performing alongside Damian Lewis in Edward Albee’s 2002 play The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?; she plays Stevie, a woman who discovers her husband is having an affair with an animal.

What was your first reaction on reading The Goat?

I thought I was due a break from theatre, because I’ve been doing a lot, »

- Holly Williams

Permalink | Report a problem


Their Finest review – sharp wartime romance

4 hours ago

Gemma Arterton shines in a big-hearted and witty drama about the making of a second world war propaganda film

London, 1940. Catrin (Gemma Arterton) is scurrying home through the blitzed streets at dusk. Without warning, she is sideswiped by a bomb blast. Blinking grit from her eyes, she stumbles into a pile of broken bodies. Her initial horror tips into laughter when she realises that they are shop mannequins. Then she notices that one of them is bleeding – a salesgirl lies amid the wreckage of the window display. While the dust and death is still clearing from the air, Catrin vomits from shock, silhouetted in a yawning archway.

The scene elegantly combines twin themes in this bracing second world war romance from Lone Scherfig. It captures the savage uncertainty of life during wartime; and, in a nod to the film’s movie industry backdrop, it deftly peels back layers of reality and artifice. »

- Wendy Ide

Permalink | Report a problem


Tramps; Sand Castle; Madame Bovary; Salt and Fire and more – review

5 hours ago

‘Straight to Netflix’ needn’t be a derogatory term – there are still gems to be found on the streaming platform

“If a movie premieres on Netflix, is it still even a movie?” asked the American film critic David Ehrlich last week, stoking an ongoing, still-heated industry debate over the streaming giant’s handling of the new films it exclusively acquires, making them skip the cinema circuit entirely. For more tradition-bound cinephiles, “straight to Netflix” has the same stigma “straight to video” once did, though in the case of so-called Netflix Originals such as Adam Leon’s Tramps, it really shouldn’t.

Leon turned heads at Cannes a few years ago with his sparky urban caper Gimme the Loot; his equally bright-eyed but more woozily romantic follow-up confirms that promise. Like Leon’s debut, it’s a lively run around the fringes of New York City. Callum Turner and Grace Van Patten, »

- Guy Lodge

Permalink | Report a problem


La 92 review – unedifying Los Angeles riots documentary

5 hours ago

A rather flat account of the week of violence that gripped the Us city 25 years ago

To mark 25 years since the Los Angeles riots, Dan Lindsay and Tj Martin put together archive footage comprising newsreels and home videos that document the city-wide carnage that followed two major events in 1991: the fatal shooting of African-American teenager Latasha Harlins by a Korean corner store clerk and, six months later, the brutal beating of African-American Rodney King by four white police officers, caught on video tape. The clerk was convicted but served no jail time; the police officers were initially acquitted. Violence, arson and looting ensued. The use of archive without voiceover means there’s a flatness to the way the events are presented; La 92 shows how these events were reported on TV but lacks its own commentary. It’s an immersive if not particularly edifying experience.

Continue reading »

- Simran Hans

Permalink | Report a problem


Rules Don’t Apply review – fast-moving, fun in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood

5 hours ago

Warren Beatty’s first film in 15 years has a wonderful romcom, featuring Lily Collins and Alden Ehrenreich, at its centre

Though he’s written, directed and produced several films, Warren Beatty is first and foremost a movie star. His first film in 15 years is about movies and movie stars; he centres actors in the frame, knowing when to hold on their faces and let their expressions carry a scene. Lily Collins and Alden Ehrenreich are almost too good here; too beautiful and too precise. It’s Beatty who is the main event, delivering an inward-looking performance, casting himself as the eccentric, increasingly erratic Howard Hughes, and even writing himself a sex scene (an invocation of Beatty’s promiscuous star persona, perhaps).

Looser, weirder and more fun than a big-budget biopic might purport to be, it takes place in Hughes’s Hollywood. The aviation junkie and billionaire film-maker was an enigma »

- Simran Hans

Permalink | Report a problem


The Transfiguration review – drab horror

5 hours ago

An unhappy marriage of indie arthouse movie and slasher flick, lacking the conviction of either genre

A friendless, orphaned teenager who lives alone with his ex-army older brother, Milo (Eric Ruffin) likes long walks, vintage horror movies and eating human flesh. He finds a companion in new neighbour Sophie (Chloe Levine), a loner with psoriasis and a tangle of curly hair. The two bond over their dead parents, flaneuring the outskirts of Brooklyn and cosying up in Milo’s apartment to watch graphic YouTube clips of animals being slaughtered. It’s all very cute. These scenes alternate with Milo’s secret kills; moments of gory violence signposted by buzzing, electronic sound design.

With its handheld tracking shots, soft lighting and long stretches of silence, the film mostly positions itself as an indie drama, though it takes great pains to namedrop its bloodsucker references (Martin, Nosferatu, Let the Right One In »

- Simran Hans

Permalink | Report a problem


Unforgettable review – Katherine Heigl finally gets her revenge

5 hours ago

The ultimate uptight blond turns psychotic ex-wife in a silly thriller that tries – and heroically fails – to be the new Fatal Attraction

Poor Katherine Heigl has been typecast as the uptight blond (think the unfortunate trifecta of Knocked Up, 27 Dresses and The Ugly Truth). Here, she at least has fun with that typecasting as tightly wound and sleekly coiffed troublemaker Tessa. A Bay Area psycho Barbie, Tessa is determined to make life difficult for her beer-brewing, rent-a-hunk, ex-husband’s (Geoff Stults) new girlfriend, Julia (a heroic Rosario Dawson, playing it as straight as the hammy script will allow). Enjoyable, too, is the inversion of the black best friend trope, with Julia’s supportive, zany bestie played by Whitney Cummings of 2 Broke Girls.

Movie super-producer Denise Di Novi’s directorial debut casts itself as an erotic thriller in the tradition of Fatal Attraction; to me, it had more in common with »

- Simran Hans

Permalink | Report a problem


The Zookeeper’s Wife review – sanitised wartime drama

5 hours ago

Jessica Chastain stars as a Warsaw animal lover who saved hundreds of Jewish people from the Nazis

Jessica Chastain’s Antonina Zabiński is “a magician” with animals in Niki Caro’s tidy Holocaust drama. When her husband’s Warsaw Zoo is bombed, it’s unsparingly brutal; bloodied polar bears are left slumped over rocks, a slain bison is lowered into a pit. A visit from Hitler’s head zoologist, Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl, deliciously creepy as the animal eugenics enthusiast), confirms the destroyed zoo must be liquidated for the war effort, though Zabiński and her husband convince him to let them convert it into a pig farm and then smuggle some 300 Jews into safekeeping under his nose.

Whether she’s up to her elbows in elephant gunk helping to resuscitate a newborn or snuggling with lion cubs, Antonina’s animal-loving tendencies don’t discriminate between species. It’s odd, then, »

- Simran Hans

Permalink | Report a problem


The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki review – a knockout boxing movie

5 hours ago

A charming tale about a featherweight uncomfortable with the unexpected burden of being a national hero

Set in the 1960s and shot in black and white on gorgeous, grainy 16mm, Juho Kuosmanen’s charming slice-of-life drama is a warm, welcome sideways look at the Finnish featherweight boxing champion Olli Mäki. Kuosmanen’s camera follows Mäki (Jarrko Lahti) documentary-style, keeping pace while he trains for a high-profile fight with an American opponent and embarks on the ensuing publicity tour. But the ever-modest Mäki is uncomfortable with his newfound status as national hero, and would prefer to spend his off-time with  girlfriend, Raija (Oona Airola, lovely and low key). The film is at its most fun outside the ring and spending time with the couple: at a wedding in the rural village of Kokkola; night swimming; she riding on the handlebars of his bike and laughing.

Continue reading »

- Simran Hans

Permalink | Report a problem


The Lovers review – Debra Winger impresses in nuanced tale of infidelity

10 hours ago

The Oscar-nominated actor stars with Tracy Letts in a well-observed film about a cheating couple who fall in love with each other again after years of marriage

For an extended period throughout the 80s and early 90s, Debra Winger was one of the most successful female actors in the industry, scoring three Oscar nominations and appearing in films, such as An Officer and a Gentleman, Terms of Endearment, and Shadowlands. But in 1995, after co-starring with Billy Crystal in Forget Paris, she took a hiatus. While she claimed it was a decision based on a simple desire for time off, many saw it as an indication of how Hollywood treats women over the age of 40, her choice of roles clearly drying up.

Related: Don't call it a comeback: the actors set to return to the A-list in 2017

Continue reading »

- Benjamin Lee

Permalink | Report a problem


No link to the Bard … but this Lady Macbeth is just as deadly

13 hours ago

Rising British star Florence Pugh wins global acclaim as ‘kick-ass’ bride in new film drama

When cinema audiences meet Florence Pugh’s striking Lady Macbeth later this week they won’t get what they expect. For a start, this is not that Lady Macbeth.

Pugh, 21, has not been cast as the Shakespearean villain who urges her husband to further her ambitions by killing a Scottish king. Instead, the acclaimed rising star from Oxfordshire plays the lead in a British retelling of a lurid Russian story from 1865 about a discontented, and ultimately violent, young bride.

Continue reading »

- Vanessa Thorpe

Permalink | Report a problem


How one woman harnessed people power to ‘save’ old New York

13 hours ago

New film tells story of Jane Jacobs’s battles against the wealthiest developers in the city

She was a beaky, bespectacled architecture writer, hardly a figure likely to ignite protests that changed the shape of one of the world’s great cities. Yet such is the legend of Jane Jacobs and her bitter struggles to preserve the heart of New York from modernisation that a film charting her astonishing victories over some of the most powerful developers in the Us is set to inspire a new generation of urban activists around the world.

Citizen Jane: Battle for the City tells the story of Jacobs, author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities, who made herself the bane of New York’s powerful city planners from the 1950s to 1970s. Her nemesis was Robert Moses, the city’s powerful master builder and advocate of urban renewal, or wholesale neighbourhood »

- Edward Helmore

Permalink | Report a problem


Raw director Julia Ducournau on how to make a horror film as creepy as possible

21 April 2017 4:33 PM, PDT

The brains behind the French cannibal film that overwhelmed Toronto audiences shares her tricks for creating menacing, hair-raising body horror

Julia Ducournau’s debut feature film, Raw, made headlines at Toronto last year when a couple of horrified audience members fainted in the cinema and an ambulance had to be called. All publicity is good publicity, but the director wasn’t thrilled.

“For me, it’s really something that I could have done without,” Ducournau said in January in Paris, to tells a room full of press. Her film – which opened this week in Australia – had just screened; none of us fainted. “I saw it snowball on the internet for a week afterwards, and there’s pretty much nothing you can do about that. At one point people were talking about a movie that is not mine ... My movie’s not a shocker, it’s not a blood fest; it’s more than that. »

- Steph Harmon

Permalink | Report a problem


Viggo Mortensen calls Argentina president 'neoliberal braggart'

21 April 2017 10:56 AM, PDT

The Lord of the Rings actor, who grew up in Argentina, films internet clip Mauricio Macri a ‘neoliberal braggart’ over rumored changes to film financing

At the climax of the epic movie trilogy Lord of the Rings, Viggo Mortensen rallies his dispirited comrades with a stirring call to arms delivered on horseback at the Black Gate of Mordor: “This day, we fight!”

This week, the Danish-American actor once again delivered a speech meant to breathe courage into his flagging crew.

Continue reading »

- Uki Goñi in Buenos Aires

Permalink | Report a problem


John Boyega: from Peckham, to the Death Star, to the Old Vic

21 April 2017 10:31 AM, PDT

British actor who found global fame in the rebooted Star Wars franchise to take lead role on London stage

Like many overnight sensations, John Boyega worked on his craft for a very long time indeed before he became famous.

The British actor was five years old when he first realised his love for performing, while playing a leopard in an infant school production.

Continue reading »

- Esther Addley

Permalink | Report a problem


How to ruin other classic movies by inserting Tom and Jerry

21 April 2017 8:53 AM, PDT

The trailer for the pair’s bizarre remake of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory has caused online ire but what other films should they also stay well away from?

Tom and Jerry: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory is a weird film. It’s a cheaply animated, near shot-for-shot remake of the beloved 1971 Mel Stuart movie – containing recognisable scenes, likenesses and backgrounds – that also happens to star Tom and Jerry, the cartoon characters so unsuitable for today’s climate that compilations of their cartoons now have to come with disclaimers where Whoopi Goldberg apologises for how racist they are.

Continue reading »

- Stuart Heritage

Permalink | Report a problem


'It's a feminist message': Gemma Arterton and Bill Nighy on Their Finest - video

21 April 2017 8:53 AM, PDT

Historical comedy-drama Their Finest is an affectionate ode to morale-boosting British Ministry of Information films of the second world war. Gemma Arterton stars as a young copywriter who is brought in to work on a film about the Dunkirk evacuation, while Bill Nighy is a fading matinee idol hoping for one last star turn. The pair discuss the role played by women in the war effort, the timely nature of their film and the challenges of doing a Welsh accent.

Continue reading »

- Gwilym Mumford and Jonross Swaby

Permalink | Report a problem


Michael Moore: 'Ignorance leads to fear, fear leads to hate. Trump knew that'

21 April 2017 8:48 AM, PDT

The Oscar-winning documentary film-maker discussed the president and the continuing relevance of Bowling for Columbine at the Tribeca film festival

It was 15 years ago when the release of Michael Moore’s landmark documentary Bowling for Columbine became a national sensation that attracted both critical acclaim and an avalanche of controversy. The film, which focused on the 1999 Columbine high school shooting and the then emerging threat of gun violence in America, won the Oscar for best documentary and functioned as a prescient warning of the American political and social upheaval that would soon hold the country in its grasp. In fact, according to Moore: “We could release this film again this Friday and it sadly would probably be every bit as relevant.”

Related: Fight the power: documentaries to unleash the activist in you

Continue reading »

- Rob LeDonne

Permalink | Report a problem


The Mad Max effect: why cinema is having a monochrome moment

21 April 2017 4:29 AM, PDT

The new colour-free version of Mad Max: Fury Road is leading a renewed charge in black-and-white filmmaking

Take a look at the latest Mad Max movie and you will notice that it isn’t, in fact, a new Mad Max at all. That’s still Tom Hardy strapped to the front of a speeding jalopy, while shaven-headed kamikaze drivers zigzag around one another bellowing their war cries. And they’re still in hot pursuit of Charlize Theron, as she ploughs her juggernaut across the post-apocalyptic desert. But the fireballs and flame-throwing guitars look subtly different now; subdued, even classical. It’s the faces and the landscapes, both equally craggy, that have a surprising new texture and prominence in George Miller’s colourless version of Mad Max: Fury Road (subtitled “black and chrome edition”), which reaches cinemas this month, two years after the success of the eye-popping original. It had been »

- Ryan Gilbey

Permalink | Report a problem


Olli Mäki, Neruda and Raw: the best films out now in the UK

21 April 2017 2:00 AM, PDT

A lighthearted Finnish comedy-drama about a real-life boxer, a biopic of Chile’s national hero and a gruesome yet beautiful cannibal horror

Gentle Finnish comedy-drama about real-life featherweight contender Olli Mäki (Jarkko Lahti) who in 1962 challenged the Us title-holder. If only he could take his eyes off the delightful Raija (Oona Airola), he might actually be in with a chance. Like Olli himself, this whimsical film is as light as a feather without ever feeling inconsequential.

Continue reading »

- Ryan Gilbey

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 52 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners