Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 54 items   « Prev | Next »


Barely Lethal review – high-school commando ninjas

32 minutes ago

Hailee Steinfeld is a trained killer who just wants to be an ordinary kid in a teen movie pastiche that misses its target

A nice idea for a teen movie pastiche (with a borderline-misjudged gag in the title) that fails to follow up on its promise. Samuel L Jackson plays Hardman, a tough military guy who runs a special ops tactical unit that takes tiny preschool girl orphans and trains them to become terrifying commando ninjas by their teens.

Hailee Steinfeld is Megan, his most gifted student, who is lonely and wants to forget about her killing techniques and just be a regular teenage girl – so she fakes her own death and enrols in a high school under a fake name, having studied movies such as Clueless, Mean Girls and 10 Things I Hate About You to get tips on how to behave.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


Hitman: Agent 47 review – shoot 'em up, grind 'em down with dullness

47 minutes ago

In this punishingly vacuous thriller, Rupert Friend is a rabbit-faced assassin with dozens of expendable types on his hitlist

Based on the video game, this actually resembles a uniquely boring, feature-length Audi commercial, incidentally intent on pinching ideas from the first two Terminators. It’s a punishingly vacuous shoot-’em-up-and-grind-’em-down-with-dullness thriller featuring Rupert Friend as the notorious rabbit-faced assassin, his face set in a thin-lipped expression of supposedly chilling impassivity that makes you think he should be nibbling lettuce.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


We Are Your Friends review – wearisome odyssey through the La club scene

1 hour ago

Zac Efron is a super-hot DJ searching for credibility amid the music-video cliches and Entourage-style bro-love

Here is a fatuous film about DJ-ing and clubbing in Los Angeles, whose tired music-video cliches and Entourage-style bro-love would be wearisome at the best of times. But coming so soon after Mia Hansen-Løve’s genuinely passionate movie Eden, on the same subject, it really is dispiriting.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


L'Eclisse review – Antonioni's strange and brilliant film rereleased

1 hour ago

Monica Vitti was never more sensual than in the story of a young woman who embarks on a doomed affair with Alain Delon’s nervy stockbroker

Michelangelo Antonioni’s mysterious and disquieting 1962 film L’Eclisse (The Eclipse) is rereleased in UK cinemas for the first time in 10 years: a twilight zone of anxiety and alienation in which the director displays his ability to slow time down a stop and allow his characters to wander in an eerily untenanted landscape. He had a knack of making Rome look as empty as the middle of the night – in the middle of the day. Did his film intuit the emptiness of growing postwar prosperity, or just have its own strange vision of the aftermath of nuclear attack?

When I last watched L’Eclisse, for a feature about the Antonioni centenary in 2012, I found myself worrying that it looked dated: especially the startling “blackface” party scene. »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


Building Jerusalem review – how rugby union kicked off a new era

1 hour ago

Documentary-maker James Erskine uncovers the human stories behind the rejuvenation of English rugby that led to World Cup victory

The latest sports doc from the industrious James Erskine zeroes in on that mid-90s moment when English rugby union was converted from hidebound amateur pursuit to the better organised proposition that carried home the 2003 World Cup.

Again, Erskine’s broadly conventional method involves informed talking heads casting light on carefully sourced archive: bluff warrior Martin Johnson represents the old school, pensive Jonny Wilkinson the new wave. Yet he’s becoming more adept at juggling the micro (analysis of coach Clive Woodward’s myriad one-yard gains) with the macro (discussing the mixed bag of Murdoch money) and retains his knack for uncovering the human stories behind these gamechangers: Johnson’s excitement at receiving a free mobile from sponsors soon subsided when he realised nobody else had one to call.

Continue reading. »

- Mike McCahill

Permalink | Report a problem


Hitting the Apex review – the rising generation of Moto Gp riders

1 hour ago

The appeal of this Brad Pitt-produced documentary will depend entirely on your interest in watching men leaning over at high speed

Beneath the leather and diesel, a heavy whiff of A-lister indulgence comes off this Brad Pitt-produced doc profiling the young generation of bikers who’ve dethroned reigning Moto Gp champ Valentino Rossi

Director Mark Neale ekes out traces of personality – the goofy Marco Simoncelli is such a vital pit-lane presence that events at the 2011 Malaysian Gp catch everyone out – but any drama is limited to the track: its grip depends entirely on your interest in watching men leaning at high speed. 

Continue reading »

- Mike McCahill

Permalink | Report a problem


Zombie Fight Club review – undead take the lift in Taiwan tower block

2 hours ago

The gore-heavy mayhem is surpassed by a rampant strain of misogyny in Joe Chien’s nasty horror flick

In a Taipei tower block, folk go about their business making breakfast, celebrating birthdays, and having drug-fuelled orgies – you know, the usual – when suddenly, a shipment of virus-infected pills starts turning everyone into zombies. An especially gore-heavy brand of mayhem ensues, which would make this an unremarkable bit of cheap tacky genre fluff if it weren’t for the particularly vicious strain of rampant misogyny that metastasises throughout the movie.

It’s not enough for director Joe Chien to make all the women screaming ninnies, but he must also dress them almost exclusively in their bras and panties and ensure the plot finds ways to have them raped from time to time.

Continue reading »

- Leslie Felperin

Permalink | Report a problem


En Equilibre review – horsing around with Gallic grace

2 hours ago

The human and equine stars are magnetic in this tale of passions ignited in the wake of a stunt-riding accident

This drama stars Albert Dupontel as a horse trainer and stunt rider who is paralysed from the waist down after an accident on a film set. Cecile De France plays a tightly chignoned insurance assessor, who years ago had aspirations to become a concert pianist, who’s trying to persuade him to accept a low-ball settlement. However, his manly mastery and hirsute dignity touches her heart and they fall in love, or at least have an affair, and she starts to rethink her life choices. 

As the above might suggest, this is about as bourgeois and Gallic as a film can be without actually dressing the characters in Breton shirts and draping ropes of onions around their necks, but the actors are undeniably magnetic, the stunt work is duly impressive, »

- Leslie Felperin

Permalink | Report a problem


Enrica Fico on her late husband Michelangelo Antonioni: ‘He was a man you could never quite reach’

4 hours ago

Ahead of the re-release of the 1962 film L’Eclisse, the director’s widow reflects on their anguished relationship, his personal demons and her enduring loyalty

It could have been one of those lingering shots of which Michelangelo Antonioni was so fond. And something like it does indeed appear in his 1995 movie, Beyond the Clouds. Enrica Fico, then 18, was sitting with a friend, an artist, Eugenio Carmi, at a table outside a cafe in the Piazza del Popolo in Rome.

“The square was deserted because it was winter,” she says, 43 years on. “I saw Michelangelo arrive from the Via del Corso in his car and walk across from the other side of the square. I saw him pay off the posteggiatore [self-appointed parking attendant] and set off towards me. He had a nervy walk, because he had a nervy physique – a very young physique. He had nervous tics, too. And a body full of creative energy. »

- John Hooper

Permalink | Report a problem


Diablo Cody: ‘Thanks to me, you get to see Meryl Streep make out with Rick Springfield!’

5 hours ago

The Oscar-winning screenwriter lives the quiet life these days, after being ‘traumatised’ by the success of Juno. She talks about staying out of the spotlight and the joy of writing romances for older characters

Diablo Cody’s new movie stars Meryl Streep and Streep’s own daughter, Mamie Gummer, as mother and daughter. It marks the reunion of Streep and Kevin Kline for only the second time since Sophie’s Choice (after A Prairie Home Companion). But all Cody wants to talk about is Rick Springfield, who plays Streep’s on-again-off-again boyfriend, the strummer in her character’s bar band.

“I’m just obsessed with Rick Springfield! I think everybody was by the time we wrapped. There’s just something about rock stars, they’re way cooler than movie people to me. He just exudes the rock-star charisma and I want to be his friend so badly. The guy can really shred! »

- John Patterson

Permalink | Report a problem


L'Eclisse - video review

5 hours ago

In an excerpt from this week’s Guardian film show Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw and Catherine Shoard review the reissue of Michelangelo Antonioni’s 1962 drama about love, lust and greed. Starring Alain Delon and Monica Vitti, L’Eclisse follows a beautiful young woman (Vitti), who breaks up with her older lover before falling for a young, materialistic stockbroker (Delon). L’Eclisse is released in UK cinemas from Friday 28 August

Continue reading »

- Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw, Catherine Shoard, Dan Susman, Henry Barnes and Andrea Salvatici

Permalink | Report a problem


We Are Your Friends - video review

5 hours ago

In an excerpt from this week’s Guardian film show Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw and Catherine Shoard watch Zac Efron take to the wheels of steel as a young DJ hoping to move the hearts and minds of a generation of clubbers with his own brand of bland, relentless Edm. Co-starring Emily Ratajkowski and Wes Bentley, We Are Your Friends is released in the UK on Friday 28 August

Continue reading »

- Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw, Catherine Shoard, Dan Susman, Henry Barnes and Andrea Salvatici

Permalink | Report a problem


Hunger Games studio plans trilogy on life of Julius Caesar

5 hours ago

The three epics will be based on British author Conn Iggulden’s series of five novels about the rise and fall of the Roman leader

A big-budget trilogy of epic films about the rise and ultimate fall of Julius Caesar, from the studio behind The Hunger Games, is heading to multiplexes, reports Deadline.

Lionsgate, which also oversaw the final two movies in the blockbuster Twilight saga, has optioned Conn Iggulden’s Emperor series of novels with the initial aim of making three films. Also titled Emperor, the planned triptych will detail Caesar’s childhood friendship with Marcus Brutus, the pair’s rise to power, and the Roman leader’s final betrayal on the floor of the senate at the hands of his lifelong comrade.

Continue reading »

- Ben Child

Permalink | Report a problem


45 Years - video review

5 hours ago

In an excerpt from this week’s Guardian film show Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw and Catherine Shoard review Weekend director Andrew Haigh’s new drama, about a couple whose long-term relationship starts to fall apart after the revelation of a closely-kept secret. Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay star in the film, which won them both acting awards at this year’s Berlin film festival. 45 Years is released in the UK on Friday 28 August

Continue reading »

- Xan Brooks, Peter Bradshaw, Catherine Shoard, Dan Susman, Henry Barnes and Andrea Salvatici

Permalink | Report a problem


Until the End of the World review – visionary techno-futurist nightmare

5 hours ago

Starring William Hurt, the five-hour director’s cut of Wim Wenders’s 1991 global road-trip movie seems even more miraculous than the leaner original

The end of the world won’t come from a nuclear blast, but from an abundance of selfies. That’s part of the message gleaned from Wim Wenders’s Until the End of the World, the 1991 film that is only now getting a Us theatrical release for its full, almost-five-hour version. Back when smartphones, Gps devices and open European borders were considered sci-fi, the two-and-a-half-hour version of this futurist’s detective story was impressive. But this movie has always had its eye on the future’s potential.

The multinational co-production was enormous in its scope, especially considering the director’s roots as an arthouse film-maker. Budgeted at more than $20m (£13m) and shot all over the world, it was conceived as the “ultimate road picture”. It was »

- Jordan Hoffman

Permalink | Report a problem


Cate Blanchett to get BFI Fellowship

7 hours ago

Oscar-winning Australian actress and theatre director to be honoured at London film festival for her outstanding achievement in film

Australian actor Cate Blanchett is to be awarded a BFI Fellowship by the UK’s lead film agency, the British Film Institute, at this year’s London film festival.

The BFI Fellowship – not to be confused with a similarly titled honour given by Bafta (the British Academy of Film and Television Arts) – is a lifetime achievement award given by the BFI board of governors and presented for “outstanding achievement in film and television”. There have been some 80 previous recipients, including Al Pacino, Judi Dench, Mike Leigh and, most recently, Mel Brooks.

Continue reading »

- Andrew Pulver

Permalink | Report a problem


45 Years review – Tom Courtenay and Charlotte Rampling superb as couple freshly possessed by the past

8 hours ago

In Andrew Haigh’s intelligent and moving drama, a retired husband and wife must rethink their whole lives together following the fallout from old news

Related: Berlin 2015 review: 45 Years – the existential terror of the wedding anniversary

The terrifying persistence of the past is the theme, and the tendency of the past to seem so much more real and more vivid than anything in the present. The repressed returns – and makes the repressor look weak. This is the second time I have seen 45 Years since it made its bow at the Berlin film festival earlier this year, and it has grown in my mind, a commanding, contemplative movie from director Andrew Haigh, adapted by him from a short story by David Constantine.

Continue reading »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


Jurassic World helps deliver blockbuster profits for Odeon & Uci cinemas

9 hours ago

Crowd-pulling dinosaur film and Fifty Shades of Grey adaptation push cinema chain into the black for first six months after £40m loss last year

Marauding killer dinosaurs and a softcore sadomasochist romance have helped Odeon & Uci cinemas to a £14.5m profit in the first six months of 2015 – a turnaround from last year’s £40m loss.

The chain, which has 243 cinemas across Europe, reported sales of £349m, up 18% on last year, fuelled in part by blockbuster films including Jurassic World and Fifty Shades of Grey.

Continue reading »

- Jennifer Rankin

Permalink | Report a problem


Star Wars: The Force Awakens set for record $615m opening

10 hours ago

Jj Abrams’s new instalment of Star Wars will zoom past Jurassic World’s $524.4m mark in its first weekend, according to Deadline, en route to a possible $2bn total

Star Wars: The Force Awakens is predicted to smash the world record for biggest global box-office opening this December with a haul in the region of $615m (£398m), according to Hollywood trade bible Deadline.

The site claims a combination of Star Wars’ enduring multigenerational popularity, a lack of competition around the film’s 18 December opening and the increasing ability of digital projection to add screens in rapid time to meet demand will power Jj Abrams’s film way beyond the $524.4m mark reached by Jurassic World in June. Deadline also believes increases in the number of Imax screens (from 800 to to 920 worldwide by December), which draw a higher premium, will benefit the film.

Continue reading »

- Ben Child

Permalink | Report a problem


Radical Moscow film festival cancelled in favour of Putin-backed replacement

14 hours ago

City council removes funding for Moscow Premiere, which screened films with controversial themes, replacing it with new Youth Festival of Life Affirming Film

A Russian film festival famed for controversial films on subjects ranging from local neo-Nazis to gay themes has been cancelled in favour of a replacement backed by Vladimir Putin’s administration.

Moscow city council abruptly removed funding for Moscow Premiere’s 13th edition, which was due to commence on 2 September, citing the local economic downturn, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Continue reading »

- Ben Child

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 54 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners