Week of   « Prev | Next »

8 articles


Movie Poster of the Week: Andrei Tarkovsky’s “Andrei Rublev”

6 hours ago

Above: a 1973 UK quad poster for Andrei Rublev (1966), artist unknown.It’s hard to say exactly when the 50th anniversary of Andrei Rublev should be celebrated. Andrei Tarkovsky’s biopic of the great 15th century Russian icon painter—originally titled The Passion According to Andrei—had initially been proposed to Mosfilm in 1961, took 4 years to get off the ground, and spent five years in bureaucratic limbo until it was finally released in the Ussr in 1971. 50 years ago, in May 1965, Tarkovsky was a month into the year-long filming of his magnum opus.As befits one of the great films about an artist and about artistic creation (although we almost never see Rublev at work in the film), Tarkovsky’s film has inspired many a great poster artist over the years. On the occasion of this tentative anniversary and also of a rare 35mm showing of the film at Bam this month, »

- Adrian Curry

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015. Day 9

20 hours ago

The festival stretches its arms today and breaths a big sigh of relief: the Cannes Marché is ending, the business types fleeing the Palais des Festivals, the Croisette and Cannes, far away from any such shuddered utterances as "Apichatpong," "Hou," or "Porumboiu." God forbid! The festival thus empties out a bit, making queues shorter, the time one can sleep in the morning precious minutes longer. The suits are replaced by regular tourists, from cruises or from the country, and the town loses a bit of its charged, schizophrenic character with this exchange, because, let's admit, the commotion money brings with it is usually a spectacle to behold. And without the money, what is Cannes?Romanian New Wave director Corneliu Porumbiou asks something related in The Treasure, one of the festival's best and a real pleasure in these last dwindling days. As slim, funny and diagrammed as a Hong Sang-soo comedy »

- Daniel Kasman

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015. Day 8

21 May 2015 5:18 PM, PDT

How nice it's been to anticipate another set of tales from modern Portugal in the form of Miguel Gomes's Arabian Nights! The film's three parts have been shown every other day here in Cannes, and I've finally caught the last and I must say I already miss the idea that Gomes and his Scheherazade will unspool even more for me two days hence. If she told the stories to her king to stave off her death, I feel Gomes is telling me stories, among many others reasons, in order to stave off the powerful aura of respectable averageness prevalent at Cannes 2015.Arabian Nights Volume 3: The Enchanted One had me smiling for a good forty-five minutes in a row. After a brief glimpse of Gomes's modern version of Scheherazade in Volume 1, we finally get to spend some time with her in "Baghdad," wandering the landscape encountering lovers and bandits, »

- Daniel Kasman

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015. Day 7

20 May 2015 9:57 PM, PDT

I left Marie-Pierre the task of teasing out the nuances of Chinese director Jia Zhangke's film in competition, Mountains May Depart, which thankfully leaves me some space to talk about it without assuredness but with avid curiosity. Because, you see, it is a tremendously odd film, as dramatic a change from his last film as that one, A Touch of Sin, was from what came before it. I don't think of Jia as a filmmaker who constantly surprises, yet looking back on his last features, I realize he keeps doing just that: I Wish I Knew, A Touch of Sin—all come from a new, acute angle than the previous film, sweeping up in their dramatic and visual expanses new ways of telling stories about a China both old and new. Here, thankfully, is an art house master whose inspiration cannot be quelled, who refuses to fall into habit.Imagine »

- Daniel Kasman

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015. Back to the Future (or: The Mother Tongue): Jia Zhangke's "Mountains May Depart"

19 May 2015 10:19 PM, PDT

Thanks to Jia Zhangke's new film, we will probably get an updated statement, for today, about the tricky matter that Jacques Rivette once closed while discussing Mizoguchi's cinema. The question of understanding (or not) a film's language and its cultural context."What is beyond doubt is that Mizoguchi's art is based on the play of personal genius within the context of a dramatic tradition. But will wanting to approach it in terms of the national culture and to find it above all such great universal values make us any the wiser? That men are men wherever they may be is something we might have predicted; to be surprised by it only tells us something about ourselves."  (translation by Liz Heron)If the question stands at the center of Jia's film, the attempted answer may well be larger than China. In this film where Jia's personal filmic geography now includes territories »

- Marie-Pierre Duhamel

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015. Day 6

19 May 2015 3:57 PM, PDT

Today the festival turns for me, beginning as it did with Volume 2 of Miguel Gomes's Arabian Nights trilogy, told in tantalizing serial progression every other day at the Directors' Fortnight. What could be more fitting than eagerly awaiting more stories from this project inspired by Scheherazade's 1001 tales? Indeed, I wonder if film is actually the best format for Gomes's ambitious project, which I could easily see sprawling into television or web episodes, an all consuming process of ingesting a never ending series of idiosyncratic, telling events of Portugal's contemporary history. Volume 2: The Desolate One suggests as much after a singular opening episode—this part begins without Volume 1's wild, meta-prologue—of a rural murderer told as a traveling pastoral through the countryside. It is a single story of crime and Rural freedom telescoped into a sunny, roving short film that imagines not the man's horrible deed but »

- Daniel Kasman

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015. Day 5

18 May 2015 11:45 PM, PDT

This was the beginning of a tantalizing series of consecutive days featuring premieres by some of the great East Asian filmmakers, beginning with Kiyoshi Kurosawa, and continuing in the following days with Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Jia Zhangke, and the long-awaited new film by Hou Hsiao-hsien. Kurosawa returns to the Cannes and the Un Certain Regard section for the first time since 2008's Tokyo Sonata, a film that helped bridge a connection to a normal art house crowd for this director too often incorrectly pegged either as some kind of arty J-Horror filmmaker or, even worse, someone who was once good at making such films. Unsurprisingly, after the wacko minimalist version of Inception (with CGI dinosaur), Real, and a featurette comedy thriller shot in Vladivostok, the director returns to Cannes with a movie that among all his many films made for cinema and television, most closely resembles Tokyo Sonata.Its unfortunately bland English title notwithstanding, »

- Daniel Kasman

Permalink | Report a problem


Cannes 2015. Day 4

17 May 2015 10:40 PM, PDT

I keep waiting for a truly great film here in Cannes, an expectation and a hope for something really striking that is undoubtably a terrible attitude to take towards this festival and film in general. (Then again, a friend and Cannes regular, when I despondently shared these thoughts, told me that it is this hope that keeps her coming back, and that without it, indeed, why even go to the movies?) With this forlorn need haunting me by the fourth day, I was rightly chastised by the first of three films by the Portuguese director of Tabu, Miguel Gomes, in the Directors' Fortnight, a trilogy titled Arabian Nights. It is not a great film, but, abashed, I think it was the kind of film I needed, a lesson not to expect masterpieces, or perfection, but proof yet again that cinema is permeable, its beauties and faults can and should leak. »

- Daniel Kasman

Permalink | Report a problem


8 articles



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners