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Quentin Tarantino Enjoys Running the New Beverly, Even When He's Shooting a Movie

1 hour ago

And Tarantino's still in charge, along with Julie McClean and Brian Quinn, even as he continues shooting "The Hateful Eight," which just left Colorado to finish filming in L.A. The theater first opened back in 1978 with a double feature of "A Streetcar Named Desire" and "Last Tango in Paris." 35mm-collector and passionate advocate Tarantino quickly lined up a slate including films from his own collection, the late Paul Mazursky ("Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice") and the late Robin Williams ("The Best of Times"), as well as a double bill of Luc Besson's "The Professional" and Tarantino's own "Pulp Fiction," both 20 years old last October.  Back in August, Tarantino told La Weekly: "I want the New Beverly to be a bastion for 35 millimeter films. I want it to stand for something. When you see a film on the New Beverly calendar, you don’t have to ask whether it’s »


- Anne Thompson

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Locarno to Honor French Actress Bulle Ogier, Favorite of Rivette, Chabrol and Fassbinder

2 hours ago

The 68th Locarno Film Festival will honor international cinema nonpareil Bulle Ogier, 75, with a Pardo alla carriera, the Swiss festival's annual lifetime achievement prize. A selection of films and a conversation with the audience will accompany the tribute. With this award the festival looks back at the legacy of the Nouvelle Vague and its most iconic figures, including past recipients Anna Karina and Jean-Pierre Léaud. A stage actress before moving to film, Bulle Ogier (née Marie-France Thielland) broke out in Jacques Rivette's "L'amour fou" (1969). This sparked a collaboration on six more films including "Celine and Julie Go Boating," "Pont du Nord" and "Gang of Four." Major European directors continued to cast her in films, from Luis Bunuel, Rw Fassbinder and Manoel de Oliveira to Claude Chabrol and Claude Lelouch, as well as her husband Barbet SchroederAlain Tanner's 1971 Swiss drama »


- Ryan Lattanzio

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Now Streaming: Xavier Dolan's Hyperbolic, Hyper-Alive 'Mommy'

3 hours ago

Take Xavier Dolan seriously. His Cannes sensation (and Oscar-snubbed) "Mommy" affirms that the prodigal filmmaker behind succès d'estime "I Killed My Mother" and the epic "Laurence Anyways" has, at 25, finally grown up. In "Mommy," Dolan wisely restrains his bravado and has never been more at home than with these three richly made characters: a scrappy and outrageously brave single mom, her smart yet deeply troubled teen with blond hair and behavioral problems, and the timid housewife with a speech impediment and secrets next door.  French-Canadian powerhouse Anne Dorval, in a wickedly unhinged performance that already feels iconic, is Diane, the widowed mother of rage-addled Steve (fresh-faced youngster Antoine Olivier Pilon), a teenager too out of control for even the steeliest boarding school. Their unbalanced, smothering relationship seems on the verge of total chaos until a diffident neighbor (Dolan pal Suzanne Clement, »


- Ryan Lattanzio

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Oscilloscope Goes on a Shopping Spree, Buying Three Fest Faves From 2014

3 hours ago

Oscilloscope Laboratories, eyeing an exciting slate for 2015, has acquired three films for Us release later this year. First up, Alice Rohrwacher’s 2014 Cannes Grand Prix winner “The Wonders”: A word-of-mouth hit on the circuit from Cannes to Nyff and AFI Fest, "The Wonders" centers on a family of beekeepers whose lives on their Italian countryside farm are upended by the arrival of a reality TV show (whose host is played by Monica Bellucci) that comes to showcase their lives. "The only Italian film competing in Cannes, and quite an atypical one at that, it should intrigue festival and art house audiences with its layers of barely-there meaning, but other viewers could find the story flimsy and the emotions scant, making it unlikely to go wide," wrote THR back at Cannes. "Alice Rohrwacher's bitter-sweet Cannes contender about the onset of adulthood and the fading of old ways is as powerful as it is enchanting, »


- Ryan Lattanzio

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Bertrand Bonello's 'Saint Laurent' Is a Dreamy, Delirious Ode to a Troubled Iconoclast

4 hours ago

Rebellious French auteur Bertrand Bonello's Yves Saint Laurent "biopic" is two-plus hours of a man sufferingly beautifully. For those cinephiles who go weak at the knees for tortured artists and decadents, "Saint Laurent" is movie heaven, starring marquee idol Gaspard Ulliel as the titular fashion-maker at his most gloriously debased. (There's a million dollar bedroom shot you won't want to miss.) In his earlier "House of Pleasures," Bonello confined his vision to the hothouse of a fin-de-siecle bordello; here, he paints his broadest vista yet, swan-diving, with postmodernist zeal, under the skin of an icon. The clothes are gorgeous, and so are the men, as played with twitchy charm by Ulliel, and an almost comically sexy, swarthy, mustachioed Louis Garrel as Jacques de Bascher, one of Saint Laurent's many despairing lovers. The film takes place in the late '60s and early '70s, when May '68 was »


- Ryan Lattanzio

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Rodney Ascher's Sleep Paralysis Doc 'The Nightmare' Almost Took Inspiration From 'Dogville' (Trailer)

4 hours ago

Ascher, who has suffered the condition himself, lays out and interprets the nocturnal experiences of eight individuals plagued by malevolent, dream-state visions—and many are alarmingly similar. Several victims are stalked beside by shadow people, or alien-like figments made of TV white noise; others feel the encroaching, creepy presence of an unseen evil force. One woman, who's made something of a YouTube celebrity out of her horrifying accounts, experiences a religious awakening because of sleep paralysis, believing that she is a kind of conduit between warring spiritual realms. One man thinks he's just crazy, and that sleep paralysis will one day kill him. But the most ingenious aspect of this spooky, silly doc is Ascher's inventively staged reenactments: eerie, cartoon-cutout figures shadow lookalike re-enactors in their sleep. The director explicitly puts the artifice of these episodes right in your face, occasionally revealing actors moving from one stage to the »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Jessica Chastain's Unforgettable Turn in 'Miss Julie' Deserves Your Attention

4 hours ago

What a shame that Jessica Chastain's fiery turn in "Miss Julie" went unnoticed by Academy voters. Director Liv Ullmann's complex take on August Strindberg's early feminist play may be too stagey for some, but this is Best Actress material for Chastain, who injects vitality into a repressed 19th-century woman who falls from grace. Chastain's electrifying performance places among the great female dramatic turns in a literary tragedy, from Nina Pens Rode in "Gertrud" to Nastassja Kinski in "Tess" and Isabelle Huppert in "Madame Bovary." So why was no one talking about it?  "Miss Julie" premiered at Tiff 2014 to unenthusiastic response and remained at-large on the distribution market before eventually landing at Wrekin Hill (the film hits home video 5/5). Perhaps too loyal to the original 1888 Swedish stage tragedy, Ullmann's version confines the three-character drama to a secluded estate over the course of one Midsummer's »


- Ryan Lattanzio

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See Andrew Garfield in First Images from Martin Scorsese's 'Silence'

5 hours ago

Based on Shūsaku Endō's 1966 novel that follows Portuguese Jesuits who face violence and persecution while on a mission to remote 17th century Japan, "Silence" began shooting in January in Taiwan, which Ang Lee suggested as a location for Scorsese, and has now wrapped filming. The real work now begins for Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker. “I’ve wanted to make “Silence” for almost two decades, and it is finally a reality," said Martin Scorsese, whose film will be domestically distributed by Paramount, with foreign markets handled by AI Films/Im Global. "Silence,"one of our most anticipated films of the year, has now been slated for a 2016 release. Read More: How Scorsese and Schoonmaker Restored "The Tales of Hoffmann" "It’s a lifetime that the character of Father Rodrigues goes through that we witness," said Garfield at a press conference in Taiwan (video below). "It’s such an agonizing lifetime that he has to live. »


- Ryan Lattanzio

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The Twin Madness of David Cronenberg's 'Dead Ringers' Still Troubles Us Today

6 hours ago

David Cronenberg’s dark-souled psychological horror film casts Jeremy Irons as Elliot and Beverly Mantle, identical twin gynecologists who make a habit of seducing their patients. Unbeknownst to these women, the twins assume each other’s identity in the bedroom as well. The sibling’s sadistic roleplaying, exacerbated by drugs and paranoia, sends their lives (and the movie) into a hellish spiral replete with typically grotesque Cronenbergian touches. Irons won the New York Film Critics award for Best Actor. »


- Trailers From Hell

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The Dramatic Story Behind Satyajit Ray's 50s Masterpiece 'The Apu Trilogy' (Exclusive)

6 hours ago

The more I've gotten to know Peter Becker, the President of the Criterion Collection and partner in Janus Films, the more I appreciate his virtues. Like many successful people, he is smart, tireless and knowledgeable, but that doesn't come close to capturing his passionate drive to restore and present the best films in the world. In short, he's obsessed. And patient. And perfectionist. He hangs on for years until a movie is right, restored and ready to be shared with the rest of us. He leaves no detail unexamined. And people trust his dedication to the original intentions of the filmmaker. Will we ever see the right and proper version of Orson Welles' fractured masterpiece "Chimes at Midnight"? Watch this space. Read More: How a Near-Pristine 35mm Print of Orson Welles' "Chimes at Midnight" Was Found As the years go by, retrieving archival prints and finding original negatives »


- Anne Thompson

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Carey Mulligan Just Says No, Goes Full Feminist with 'Far from the Madding Crowd' and 'Suffragette'

10 hours ago

Like other intelligent women, she'd rather tread the boards than take yet another cookie-cutter role hanging on the arm of a fully-rounded leading man. She listened when her London agent Tor Befrage told her that she was in a good enough place to be able to turn down anything that she didn't feel she had to do because she couldn't bear the idea of someone else doing it. "I like taking time off," she tells me in a phone interview on her day off from her Broadway hit "Skylight," for which she and Bill Nighy both scored Tony nominations. Will Bathsheba earn her another Oscar nod? Reviews are strong, box office still to be determined.  While she took the plum role of Daisy opposite Leonardo DiCaprio in Baz Luhrmann's lavishly appointed "The Great Gatsby" and worked for Oliver Stone on "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps," Mulligan doesn't like most »


- Anne Thompson

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