Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 27 items   « Prev | Next »


Focus World Buys Sundance Suspense Yarn 'Cop Car'

10 hours ago

Focus Features boutique arm Focus World has acquired Us and UK rights to director Jon Watts' Sundance premiere "Cop Car," starring Kevin Bacon, James Freedson-Jackson, Hays Wellford, Shea Whigham and Camryn Manheim. Produced by Cody Ryder, Alicia Van Couvering, Sam Bisbee, Andrew Kortschak and Jon Watts, this cat-and-mouse turns on a "a harrowing crash course full of mayhem as a pair of 10-year-old boys attempt to navigate the back roads behind the wheel of a seemingly abandoned police car that they have no clue how to operate," per the official synopsis. Things go from bad to worse when a small-town sheriff sets his sights on getting the car back—at any cost. Reviews have been solid. The Guardian praises Kevin Bacon's performance especially: "Bacon, sporting a creepy moustache, is great, and both boys give strong, naturalistic performances." Focus World is planning a simultaneous theatrical and VOD release of »


- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Bobcat Goldthwait Turns Docmaker To Celebrate Comic Hero of 'Call Me Lucky'

13 hours ago

"I want to prove F. Scott Fitzgerald wrong," Bobcat Goldthwait told me, "that there are no second acts." Not only has he directed seven films over the past decade, but he's also having a blast directing "Community." "Call Me Lucky," his third Sundance debut and first documentary, is a profile of standup comic Barry Crimmins.  Goldthwait's last fiction film "Willow Creek" was a found footage Bigfoot movie with the filmmaker "interviewing actual folks in a town and putting them in a suspense scary buffet movie." So it was natural that he should go full documentary for "Call Me Lucky," which started with Goldthwait's best friend of 33 years, Robin Williams (he still gets teary when his name comes up), who was trying to make a scripted narrative movie about Crimmins. "It seemed like it was hard to get going that way," said Goldthwait. "So Robin suggested we make it as a documentary. »


- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Reviews: Robert Redford Vehicle 'A Walk in the Woods' Is a Slog

16 hours ago

Based on Bill Bryson's 1998 memoir, "A Walk in the Woods," directed by Ken Kwapis from a script by Rick Kerb and Bill Holderman, failed to impress critics when it premiered at Sundance last Friday. The film stars festival founder Robert Redford as the aging Bryson, determined to shake things up by hiking the Appalachian Trail with his old friend, Katz (Nick Nolte). Other cast members include Emma Thompson, Nick Offerman, and Kristen Schaal. Despite echoes of "Wild" and Redford's celebrated man-versus-nature turn in "All Is Lost," however, "Woods" does not manage to spin the sparring between the grizzled leads into either comedy gold or a meditation on growing old. Most early reviews have pegged the film as a predictable -- if pleasant -- diversion, too insubstantial to have much impact beyond the name recognition of the cast.   Daniel Fienberg, Hitfix: "Surely there's an audience out there in the world for 'Grumpy Old. »


- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Ava DuVernay's Gracious, Humble Response to 'Selma' Oscar Snub

18 hours ago

Speaking with Democracy Now!'s Amy Goodman at Sundance yesterday, "Selma" director Ava DuVernay responded to the furor surrounding the film with characteristic grace, paying homage to the "giants, real, bold, brave Americans of color, and otherwise, all kinds of people, who marched for something that was really important" before addressing Hollywood's systemic failure to make room for diverse voices. (Watch the full interview below.)    Acknowledging that the film's Best Picture nomination is "nothing to sneeze at," DuVernay argues that the problem is not the Academy per se, but the fact that "Selma" was the only strong Oscar contender this year to feature people of color in prominent roles in front of and behind the camera: [T]he question is: Why was Selma the only film that was even in the running with people of color for the award? You know what I mean? I mean, why are there not—not just black, »


- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


Kristen Stewart Is First American Actress Nominated for César Awards in 30 Years; 'Saint Laurent' Leads with Ten

19 hours ago

Kristen Stewart picked up the first nomination for an American actress at France's César Awards since opera singer Julia Migenes' performance in the 1984 film adaptation of "Carmen," nabbing a Best Supporting Actress nod for her role as an aging film star's assistant in Olivier Assayas' "Clouds of Sils Maria." Bertrand Bonello's "Saint Laurent" leads this year's nominations with 10, including Best Film and Best Director. "Les Combattants" (nine), "Timbuktu" (eight), and yet another biopic of the famed French designer, "Yves Saint Laurent" (seven), were also among those lauded by the French Académie today. Stewart's "Sils Maria" co-star Juliette Binoche, Oscar nominee Marion Cotillard ("Two Days, One Night"), and screen legend Catherine Deneuve ("Dans La Cour") all feature in the packed race for Best Actress, while Céline Sciamma's acclaimed "Girlhood" »


- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


Fox Searchlight Continues Sundance Acquisitions Spree with Period Tearjerker 'Brooklyn'

21 hours ago

Fox Searchlight came to Sundance with Jonah Hill / James Franco thriller "True Story" in hand, picked up director Noah Baumbach's latest collaboration with Greta Gerwig, "Mistress America," before the festival began, and partnered with producer Indian Paintbrush to snag "Me and Earl and the Dying Girl" earlier this week. The distributor's acquisitions spree continues with the period melodrama "Brooklyn" -- to the tune of $9 million, according to Variety, the price tag fueled by a bidding war that included The Weinstein Company, Focus Features, and Roadside. Based on Colm Tóibín's 2009 novel, adapted by the ever-popular Nick Hornby and directed by John Crowley, the film stars Saoirse Ronan ("Atonement") as a young woman who emigrates from Ireland to the titular New York borough in 1952. As Entertainment Weekly notes, it's a homecoming of sorts for the 20-year-old Irish actress, who also appears in this year's Sundance »


- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


How They Sustained the Times Square Momentum in 'Birdman' Video

22 hours ago

The inertia of the brilliant Times Square scene in Alejandro González Iñárritu's "Birdman" is deceptive. What seems like a roller coaster ride that stops actually picks up again when Michael Keaton re-enters the theater to continue his manic performance. We get the lowdown on the Best Picture contender from cinematographer Emmanuel "Chivo" Lubezki (favored to win his second consecutive Oscar), supervising sound editor Aaron Glascock and re-recording mixer Jon Taylor (who is also nominated for "Unbroken" with fellow "Birdman" mixer Frank A. Montaño). "It was a fun scene that releases all the tension and anxiety and insanity from the previous Times Square scene," Lubezki admits. "He's not wearing his wardrobe -- he's almost naked -- and the ticket lady doesn't recognize him, and then he encounters a lawyer and the actor that's trying to sue him. The entrance was lit »


- Bill Desowitz

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance: Oksana Baiul, Acclaimed Director Don Hertzfeldt Featured Among Fest's Short Film Awards

22 hours ago

"World of Tomorrow," Don Hertzfeldt's seventh film to play in competition at Sundance (a festival record), has been awarded the 2015 Short Film Grand Jury Prize, burnishing an already impressive resume that includes the Oscar-nominated animated short "Rejected" (2000). Jurors K.K. Barrett, Alia Shawkat, and Autumn de Wilde chose "World of Tomorrow," in which "a little girl is taken on a mind-bending tour of the distant future," from 60 films in this year's Short Film program, which was culled from more than 8,000 submissions. Recipients will be among the honorees at Saturday's awards ceremony, hosted by Tig Notaro and available to stream live at the festival's website. Check out the full list of winners below, along with Hertzfeldt's special guest appearance as writer, animator, and director of the first two minutes of the season premiere of "The Simpsons." Short Film Grand Jury Prize: "World of Tomorrow" / U.S.A. »


- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance: Sony Pictures Classics Acquires 'Grandma,' Starring the 'Irreplaceable' Lily Tomlin

23 hours ago

Sony Pictures Classics announced late last night that it has acquired the worldwide rights to "Grandma," in a deal reported to be worth roughly $2 million. Premiering Friday at Sundance, the film stars Lily Tomlin as sharp-tongued poet Elle Reid, who breaks off a four-month relationship with her girlfriend (Judy Greer) and traverses L.A. to scrounge up the $600 her granddaughter (Julia Garner) needs for an abortion. Directed by Paul Weitz ("About a Boy"), the film also features Marcia Gay Harden, Sam Elliott, "Orange is the New Black" stalwart Laverne Cox, John Cho, and the late Elizabeth Peña, in one of her final screen roles. The news marks the latest milestone in Tomlin's resurgence, 40 years after her career-defining role in Robert Altman's "Nashville." The 75-year-old actress is slated to appear with Jane Fonda in Netflix's highly anticipated comedy "Grace and Frankie," which debuts May 8. Early notices for »


- Matt Brennan

Permalink | Report a problem


HBO Greenlights Musical Period Pilot from Elton John and Alan Ball

28 January 2015 4:47 AM, PST

HBO has given the go-ahead to the pilot for "Virtuoso," a musical series from Elton John, his husband David Furnish and "True Blood" creator Alan Ball. The hour-long period drama follows a class of young, 18th-century European musicians attending a prestigious music academy in Vienna. Production is set to begin in Budapest this Spring. Ball's partner Peter Macdissi, who appeared in both "True Blood" and "Six Feet Under," Ball's first cable series after his "American Beauty" Oscar win for Best Screenplay, will star and executive-produce. Ball and Macdissi have written the teleplay, with a pilot story to be penned by Macdissi, Ball and co-executive producer Steve Hamilton Shaw. This isn't the only musical period series on HBO's docket. Martin Scorsese has a full series order on his plate for a yet-to-be-titled '70s rock drama co-executive produced by Terence Winter and Mick Jagger. (More on that here.) »


- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


6 Things to Know About Sexy Sundance Breakout 'Diary of a Teenage Girl,' Part of Sundance's Women's New Wave

27 January 2015 1:58 PM, PST

Debuting director Marielle Heller, working with the graphic novel by Phoebe Gloeckner, gets it right. The movie is by far my favorite at the festival--and I am not alone. The early buzz was right: the movie played like gangbusters. And sure enough the movie landed distribution from Sony Pictures Classics, which picked up rights in North America, Latin America, Australia, New Zealand, Eastern Europe excluding Russia, Asia, Scandinavia and Germany. Here are six things to know about "The Diary of a Teenage Girl": 1. The film gets away with its underage sexuality because it's set in the free-wheeling '70s. I can testify to the film's authenticity; they get the period right. Although I grew up on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, not San Francisco, when I was in high school, I too lived in a heavily sexualized household with an irresponsible hard-partying single parent who could not be »


- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance: 'David Robert Mitchell on 'It Follows,' Std Anxiety, Childhood Nightmares

27 January 2015 11:01 AM, PST

I first met David Robert Mitchell at Cannes 2010 when his first film "The Myth of the American Sleepover" played Critics' Week, after earning raves at SXSW and ahead of its 2011 opening via IFC. Well, the Cannes programmers still like his movies, screening his sophomore effort "It Follows" as well. The film has played fests including Toronto, Fantastic Fest, AFI Fest and plays the Park City at Midnight section this week at Sundance. RADiUS-twc opens the film stateside March 13, 2015. Shot again near his hometown of Detroit, Michigan, Mitchell brings the same dreamy tone to a horror tale, taking full advantage of the destroyed Michigan landscape (as does Ryan Gosling's Cannes entry "Lost River"). Mitchell wants to scare us, pulling us into his likable characters' romantic entanglements and then puts us on edge as we wonder who's following who. His greatest skill as a filmmaker is immersing us in his characters' points-of-view--we're bobbing in a. »


- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Trailer for Sundance Sensation 'Dope' Feels Like '90s "Hood" Classics on Speed

27 January 2015 9:59 AM, PST

In one of the buzziest buys of the Sundance Film Festival so far, Open Road Films and Sony Pictures jointly won the bidding battle for "Dope," Rick Famuyiwa's hip-hop-addled, coming-of-age comedy for the millennial set. Trailer below. "Dope" centers on the subcultures, gangsters and drug dealers dwelling in a hardscrabble Inglewood, CA. Shameik Moore plays Malcolm, frontman of a nerdy punk band called The Bottoms, who's pulled into a debauchery-filled netherworld of offbeat characters and bad behavior after scoring a chance invite to a big underground party. Drawing comparisons to "Superbad," "Go," "Pulp Fiction," as well as "Boyz n the Hood" and the "Friday" series, the film has already captured strong reviews and great word-of-mouth. TWC, A24, Fox Searchlight and Focus were among distributors bidding into the wee small hours this weekend. Deadline pitches the Open Road/Sony deal at $7 million, and with »


- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance: Magnolia Buys Sean Baker's 'Tangerine,' Shot Entirely on an iPhone

27 January 2015 9:42 AM, PST

Sean Baker's hotly buzzed Sundance Next entry "Tangerine" has sold worldwide rights to Magnolia Pictures, which will distribute nationwide in theaters later this year. Baker's followup to 2012 fest darling "Starlet," "Tangerine" follows trans actresses Mya Taylor and Kitana Kiki Rodriguez as two working girls looking for a pimp on Christmas Eve in Hollywood. Co-written by Baker and Chris Bergoch, the film was executive produced by Sundance MVPs Mark and Jay Duplass, and produced by Through Films and Baker's longtime collaborators Darren Dean and Shih-Ching Tsou. Shot entirely on an iPhone 5s by Radium Cheung, this marks Magnolia's second acquisition of the fest after Andrew Bujalski's "Results." Reviews have been stellar for "Tangerine," with Indiewire noting that Baker "manages to match underrepresented faces in American cinema with material that lets their personalities shine." »


- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Raves About Ewan McGregor as Jesus and the Devil in 'Last Days in the Desert'

27 January 2015 8:49 AM, PST

Early critical praise bodes well for Sundance premiere "Last Days in the Desert," which had its first official screening over the weekend in Park City. Writer/director García moves from the tangled women's tales of his earlier films ("Nine Lives" and "Mother Child" among them) to this male-driven, imagined chapter of Jesus' 40 days of fasting and praying in the desert, where he confronts the Devil. Ewan McGregor plays both roles in this hotly buzzed drama lensed in just five weeks by "Birdman" cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, who reunites here with "The Tree of Life"'s Tye Sheridan, costarring alongside McGregor and Ciaran Hinds. Here's what critics are saying so far. While decidedly noncommercial, the film is likely to be a controversial gotta-see-it among Christians and adventuresome moviegoers. Screen Daily: "A powerfully meditative experience that grapples with themes of faith, destiny, death, and fathers and »


- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


What to Expect from This Year's Music-Filled Oscars Show

27 January 2015 8:31 AM, PST

As hoped, Oscar producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron, now in their third running, will be delivering a most musical Academy Awards this year.  The longtime movie musical impresarios have announced that host Neil Patrick Harris will perform an original song-and-dance number penned by the "Frozen" team. Oscar winners Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez are currently writing a multimedia musical sequence titled "Moving Pictures" for Harris, who tweeted the news Tuesday morning.  Lopez won Tonys and Grammys for his button-smashing Broadway musicals "Avenue Q" and "The Book of Mormon," and is working on the upcoming stage musical "Up Here" along with "Frozen" co-writer Anderson-Lopez. Golden Globe winners John Legend and Common will also perform their Oscar-nominated "Glory" from "Selma," sure to be a big emotional moment on the Oscars telecast. Legend recently stopped by the Sundance Film »


- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar Loves Diseases and Disorders: 6 Contenders and the Hard Truths They Don't (or Do) Ignore

27 January 2015 7:54 AM, PST

Oscar often has a soft spot for an acting gimmick, something that proves that the performer has somehow shown themselves worthy of a gold statue by virtue of the physical and mental demands of their role. Extreme weight loss or gain has been a popular way to capture the attention of Academy voters. Christian Bale is the current champ at this form of acting, taking over from Robert De Niro, whose 60-pound weight gain for his Oscar-winning boxing role in 1980’s “Raging Bull” is the stuff of legend. In the past, the six-footer has packed on muscle for 2000’s “American Psycho” and for his Batman films. But, in between, he dropped an alarming number of pounds to achieve a rail-like physique in 2004’s “The Machinist” and 2006’s “Rescue Dawn.” But all his yo-yo dieting finally paid off with Oscar success when Bale won supporting as a crack-addict boxer in 2010’s »


- Susan Wloszczyna

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Jason Segel on Playing David Foster Wallace in Sundance's 'End of the Tour' (Exclusive Interview)

26 January 2015 4:15 PM, PST

A24 picked up, sight-unseen, three-time Sundance director James Ponsoldt's two-hander "The End of the Tour," which world-premiered Friday night at a rousing screening at the Sundance Film Festival. Based on David Lipsky's 375-page memoir "Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace," the film tracks Rolling Stone writer Lipsky's five-day 1996 immersion with writer Wallace, who was uncomfortable with all the kudos he was getting for his postmodern novel "Infinite Jest." Jesse Eisenberg plays the alert and slightly envious novelist Lipsky opposite lanky Jason Segel as Wallace, who fought depression and resisted fame until he took his own life in 2008. Lipsky told me that he was relieved at the time that the interview was never published, as other things came up and pushed it aside. The movie opens as Lipsky hears of Wallace's death, unearths the tapes and puts fresh batteries into his. »


- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Filmmakers, Give Us Your Numbers! Sundance and Cinereach Unveil The Transparency Project

26 January 2015 1:19 PM, PST

The Sundance Institute understands that information is power. For filmmakers, producers, exhibitors and distributors, knowing how to crunch the numbers can make all the difference in getting films made at the right production level and sold to the right distributor. There's a lot of guesswork and mystery around the real returns from the multiplatform releases that are so prevalent today. So the Sundance Institute's Executive Director Keri Putnam and Chris Horton, Director of Creative Distribution and Artist Services, along with consultant Brian Newman of Sub-Genre are finally presenting The Transparency Project to the industry, first at the Art House Convergence last week, and on Monday at the Sundance Film Festival's annual Artist Services workshop. Cinereach's Executive Director Phillip Engelhorn and Producer in Residence Paul Mezey are also involved in the project which launched with a pilot study in December, 2013. Their goal »


- Anne Thompson

Permalink | Report a problem


Sundance Review: François Delisle's Family Tragedy 'Chorus' Stuns in Black-and-White

26 January 2015 1:14 PM, PST

Beginning with an unsettling, long-take interrogation scene, the first moments of François Delisle's "Chorus" establish a lethally entwined triptych of souls: an incarcerated pedophile who confesses to an appalling crime, handsome but visibly haunted Christophe (Sébastien Ricard) adrift in Mexico, and Irene (Fanny Mallette), a Montreal choir singer perpetually moments away from a full-bore panic attack. These delicately stitched, emotional telegrams reveal that Christophe and Irene are ex-lovers, estranged for a decade since their eight-year-old son vanished inexplicably. Christophe leads a dissolute life of empty sex and self-numbing habits, as seen in a jaggedly cut sequence that recalls Steve McQueen's "Shame" as a picture of one man's dismal sexual reality: the naked woman sleeping in his bed is replaced by a sudden vision of Christophe's presumably dead son. Meanwhile, the medicated and deeply depressed Irene trudges through the days, »


- Ryan Lattanzio

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 27 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners