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'The Sing-Off' recap: One night, six groups, 800 blazers

1 hour ago

Well, here we are, at the most wonderful time of the year: The Sing-Off is back, and you can never really know for how long, so cherish every minute, even when they all come on the same night. In its fifth season of dodging the eviction notice NBC keeps hiding in Shawn Stockman’s dressing room, The Sing-Off returned as a one-night, two-hour holiday special. And even at just two hours—half the length of a typical singing show’s weekly allotment—I stand by this being the best happiest show on television. Hyperbolic? Sure. But what is a cappella for, »


- Jodi Walker

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Truth, answers, and other things 'Serial' never promised you

8 hours ago

"You want answers?" "I think I'm entitled!" "You. Want. Answers?!" "I want the Truth!" "You can't handle the truth!" —A Few Good Men Since the first week of October, millions of listeners have tuned into a weekly podcast that reinvestigated the 1999 murder of a Baltimore high school student. Adnan Syed was convicted and sentenced to life in prison for strangling his ex-girlfriend, Hae Min Lee, but the Serial podcast, narrated by Sarah Koenig, has tantalized an obsessive audience with the possibility that an innocent man has been in prison for 15 years. If you haven't become an obsessed listener, there's a »


- Jeff Labrecque

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What to expect from the season 5 'Sing-Off' groups: A very careful aca-sessment

11 hours ago

The first time I heard that The Sing-Off was going to be limited to a one-night special this year, I went through some pretty serious turmoil. All five stages of grief passed through in a matter of minutes: Denial that the entirety of season 5 could potentially only include one Nick Lachey jewel tone button-down; Anger that NBC was doing this to us; Bargaining that we might somehow lure Ben Folds back in a judge's chair with a Warby Parker gift basket of sorts; Depression that Home Free would be unceremoniously replaced as the reigning champs in just two short hours; and finally, »


- Jodi Walker

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Entertainment Geekly: What 'Hobbit 3' says about Peter Jackson

13 hours ago

There's a moment in The Hobbit 3 that I'm going to spoil for you, because nothing else that happens in The Hobbit 3 really matters. It's a moment of crisis for Thorin Oakenshield. "Who is Thorin Oakenshield?" is something you might be asking, even if you've seen the first two Hobbit movies. It's hard to keep track of names in these Hobbit movies, even though half the dialogue is just people saying names. Which is strange. Because when Jackson and co-writers Philippa Boyens and Fran Walsh adapted The Lord of the Rings, they found a way to sharpen J.R.R. Tolkien's dense prose into thrill-drunk poetry. »


- Darren Franich

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Can we stop talking about how great 'The Simpsons' is?

13 hours ago

As someone who writes about both television and comic books, I'm often surprised at how ruthless their fans can be. There's always a vocal contingent that seems willing to abandon a series at the drop of a hat, making a big show of quitting it—or at least talking about quitting, should it fail to clear some threshold of quality. Whether or not they actually do quit is another question altogether. But if there's one question that's bugged me, it's this: Why does The Simpsons, which celebrates its 25th anniversary today, get a pass? »

- Joshua Rivera

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Lena Dunham won the red carpet this year (by losing it)

14 hours ago

It's been 13 years since Björk laid an egg at the Academy Awards. And if the Oscars', Emmys', and Golden Globes' red carpets are the Triple Crown of Thoroughbred Gowns, that's nearly 40 nights of appropriate and borrowed, jewel-toned and fish-tailed, corporate-sponsored parade floats accessorized with diamonds, security guards, and phonetically spelled designer names for E! Entertainment's "mani cam" (Moh-neek Luh-hoo-lee-ay). As award show arrivals have morphed into a shameless interstate billboard—stars can earn a cool million for their jewelry choices alone—red carpet fashion has in turn become a bland gated community filled with highly rehearsed Vanna Whites pretending they actually picked out their clothes. »


- Jason Sheeler

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Watch celebrities talk about their favorite holiday movies -- like, you know, 'The Big Lebowski'

14 hours ago

As the holiday season rolls around, EW got around to asking film and television stars about the movies they like to watch around the holidays. We learned many things about stars' holiday viewing choices, like how depressingly enjoyable Alex Borstein finds the Charlie Brown movies, and how Amber Tamblyn enjoys an annual viewing of The Big Lebowski. Also, Lisa Edelstein does not like holidays! Girlfriends' Guide to Divorcing Holiday Movies is more like it, right? »


- Teresa Jue

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Join in: Robbie Amell of 'The Duff' will answer your questions on EW's Facebook page

15 hours ago

Robbie Amell is getting ready for a busy year: In his spare time outside of playing the recurring role of Firestorm on The Flash, he's appearing alongside Mae Whitman in The Duff. On Wednesday, Amell himself will host a Q&A session at EW’s Facebook page—so come ask him your burning questions. Amell will start answering questions starting at 3:35 p.m. Et. »


- Teresa Jue

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Watch a spot-on 'Serial' parody from Funny or Die

15 hours ago

On Thursday, true-crime podcast Serial will release its first season's 12th and final episode. Along with producer Julie Snyder, host Sarah Koenig has attempted to determine whether Adnan Syed was wrongfully convicted of Baltimore high school student Hae Min Lee's 1999 murder. Listeners have started to question if Koenig will even try to cast judgment on the case, given the lack of conclusive evidence. Television and movies have conditioned us for tidy endings, which Serial might not have. A new Funny or Die short pokes fun at that. »


- Eric Renner Brown

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This week's cover: 'Star Wars,' Adele, and the 116 things you're going to talk about in 2015

16 hours ago

Phew—2014 is over. But you know what that means. Another year is on the horizon, and with a turn of the calendar comes a tidal wave of pop culture items, each eager to become your new favorite thing. Fortunately for you, Entertainment Weekly’s annual forecast issue is here to help you wade through the waters and find the movie, show, album, or book (it's a race to find the next Gone Girl!) that’s destined to find its way into your hands in 2015. You may have heard about a few little indies coming up. Star Wars: The Force Awakens? »


- EW staff

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Robin Williams' son remembers his dad: 'I miss him all the time'

18 hours ago

Robin Williams' son Zak spoke to People magazine about the loss of his father, who died in August at age 63. "I miss him all the time," Zak said in the cover story. "Often I see something or if I'm watching a film, I think, 'Oh, man, he would have appreciated this,' or 'He would have gotten a laugh out of this," Zak said. Some of Robin's own films continue to come out, including Dec. 19's Night at the Museum: Secret of the Tomb. He also starred in Merry Friggin' Christmas, a holiday film that was released in November. »


- Ariana Bacle

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Justin Timberlake, Jimmy Fallon go to summer camp on 'Tonight Show'

18 hours ago

Justin Timberlake and Jimmy Fallon donned wigs and braces for a Tuesday Tonight Show sketch that involved the two acting like teenage boys who just can't stop singing Third Eye Blind's "Jumper"—even despite their counselor's pleas to stop. The two have performed the "Camp Winnipesaukee" sketch before, with previous versions featuring Timberlake and Fallon belting out fellow throwback hits Toto's "Africa" and Hootie and the Blowfish's "Only Wanna Be With You." »


- Ariana Bacle

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15 real things the fake 'Stephen Colbert' has done

16 December 2014 3:02 PM, PST

It's going to be hard to say goodbye to The Colbert Report this Thursday—mostly because it'll mean saying goodbye to "Stephen Colbert," the ruthlessly ignorant, hilariously pompous, utterly indelible faux conservative pundit that the real Stephen Colbert has been playing on late-night TV for over a decade (if you count the Daily Show years). "Colbert" isn't a great creation just because of all the jokes he's told and the absurdities he's exposed via satire—he's also a character for the ages because of the many ways he's had an impact on the real world. What kind of impact? Start »


- Hillary Busis

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The best 'Lord of the Rings' experience this year is a game, not a movie

16 December 2014 2:10 PM, PST

Over a decade after The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring debuted in theaters, Peter Jackson's cinematic excursion into J.R.R. Tolkien's universe finally concludes after approximately 782 hours worth of movies with The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies. Armies should be a victory lap—celebrating the series and its mark on film while bringing the six-film series to a fitting conclusion. But instead, the bloated trilogy of Hobbit films—originally meant to be a two-parter—has demonstrated audience and critical fatigue with each new outing. Both Hobbit films released so far have made less »


- Jonathon Dornbush

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Watch Chris Pratt sing Li'l Sebastian's eulogy song at the 'Parks and Rec' wrap party

16 December 2014 9:41 AM, PST

The final season of Parks and Recreation hasn't begun airing yet, but it's hard not to get a little emotional as the cast members finish up their time on the show. First, the last day on set photos. Now, Chris Pratt singing "5,000 Candles in the Wind," Andy Dwyer's song in honor of the late, great Li'l Sebastian, at the Parks wrap party. »


- Esther Zuckerman

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Jimmy Fallon, Oprah Winfrey star in a soap opera (with vocal effects)

16 December 2014 7:56 AM, PST

Many people don't remember this, but back in the '80s, Jimmy Fallon and Oprah Winfrey starred in a soap opera together. The two played a husband and wife on Midnight Meadows, which was almost as popular as Days of Our Lives. To refresh everyone's memory, Fallon played a clip from the '80s hit when Winfrey stopped by the Tonight Show. Apparently, it wasn't just a soap opera, but rather a soap opera with vocal effects. »


- Samantha Highfill

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A 'New Year's Eve'-esque Hanukkah movie, starring Natalie Portman and Drake? EW can see it now...

16 December 2014 7:45 AM, PST

Valentine's Day. New Year's Eve. Christmas, via Love Actually. Plenty of cold-weather holidays have inspired lighthearted ensemble rom-coms featuring intertwining stories and scads of celebrities. So why not the Jewish Festival of Lights? That's where we come in. This year, EW decided to celebrate Hanukkah (which begins tonight at sundown) by imagining our ideal Hanukkah movie—starring a boatload of Jewish celebrities (appearing under their real names!) and directed, of course, by Garry Marshall. Click below to see our movie's im-poster, designed as always by Jef Castro—and to learn which boldface names Hillary Busis and Esther Zuckerman decided to pair up in the film. »


- EW staff

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The year late-night got it right... and dodged another meltdown

15 December 2014 5:09 PM, PST

Was it really as simple as getting rid of Jay Leno? For the longest time, late-night television was a battlefield. Beginning with Johnny Carson's retirement in 1992—which set up the Leno/Letterman divide that would define the landscape for two decades—and best epitomized by the disastrous 2009 Tonight Show handover and subsequent takeback from Conan O'Brien, late-night has always been a bloody zero-sum conflict that inflated every minor change to the equation into a major tectonic shift. NBC so bungled the Leno/O'Brien transition that when rumors began to emerge in early 2013 that the last-place network was planning to »


- Jeff Labrecque

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Are Mel Brooks movies worse when they feature more Mel Brooks? PopWatch Investigates!

15 December 2014 1:20 PM, PST

Forty years ago today, Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder's Young Frankenstein shuffled into theaters. The film was an instant success, earning both healthy box office figures and critical acclaim (even if it was of the guarded sort: "It would be misleading to describe Young Frankenstein... as astoundingly witty, but it's a great deal of low fun of the sort that Mr. Brooks specializes in," sniffed Vincent Canby of The New York Times). The movie went on to earn a pair of Oscar nominations, prime spots on scores of "best comedy" lists, and the reputation of being perhaps Brooks' best film ever. »


- Hillary Busis

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Woody Allen riffs on his early comedy career in 'The Stand Up Years' -- exclusive

15 December 2014 1:01 PM, PST

Long before he morphed into one of the most celebrated American filmmakers in history, Woody Allen got his first taste of fame as a stand-up comedian working in the clubs in New York's Greenwich Village in the 1960s. Those formative experiences are captured on the forthcoming The Stand Up Years, a two-disc set that captures some of Allen's finest jokes and onstage moments. »


- Kyle Anderson

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