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A call to action would be nice in ‘Wonder Woman’ #37

3 hours ago

‘Wonder Woman’ #37

Written by Meredith Finch

Pencils by David Finch

Published by DC Comics

Coming off from the start of a brand new story arc and creative team, ‘Wonder Woman’ #37 is very lacking in story and has fluff for artwork.

The opening arc continues as Wonder Woman feels that she’s torn between her many responsibilities. Not only does Diana have to fight injustice as Wonder Woman, but must rule the the Amazons as their new queen and serve as the new God of War. The conflict between these three responsibilities is posed as the central theme of this issue. However, very little of it is explored. Including the last issue, it seems the only responsibilities Diana has as Wonder Woman are those as a member of the Justice League. She lacks any personal villains to call her own, so instead it’s the League whom come calling to remind »

- Grant Raycroft

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‘Pokemon Omega Ruby’ and ‘Alpha Sapphire’ are your winter travel destinations

9 hours ago

Pokemon: Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire

Game Freak

Nintendo/The Pokemon Company

Nintendo 3Ds

In the 1990′s, there were a multitude of fads that created a brief flash in the pan, and then petered away into nothingness. One unexpectedly long-running phenomena from that era is Pokemon, and the new additions to the series, Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire keep the dream alive of catching collectible creatures centered in a universe of creativity and combat.

Omega Ruby and Alpha Sapphire, known all over as simply Oras, are a re-imagining of the third generation of Pokemon Ruby/Sapphire. Taking place in the lush, tropical Hoenn Region, your task is to aid Professor Birch in his task of collecting, documenting, and observing the titular creatures alongside his daughter/son, who ends up being the opposite gender of the player character. Along the course of your very own journey, players will come across the villain teams, »

- Robert Mcguigan

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‘Saving Private Ryan’, ‘Lebowski’, ‘Willy Wonka’ added to National Film Registry

10 hours ago

Every year, the National Film Registry within the Library of Congress selects 25 films worthy of preservation. The films must be at least 10 years old, and this year’s crop includes such films as Steven Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan, The Coen Brothers’ The Big Lebowski, the John Wayne vehicle Rio Bravo and the beloved children’s classic Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.

The full list of films now includes 650 films, with the most recent now being from 2004, James Benning’s documentary 13 Lakes.

The full list of additions is below:

13 Lakes (2004) Bert Williams Lime Kiln Club Field Day (1913) The Big Lebowski (1998) Down Argentine Way (1940) The Dragon Painter (1919) Felicia (1965) Saving Private Ryan (1998) Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986) The Gang’s All Here (1943) House of Wax (1953) Into the Arms of Strangers: Stories of the Kindertransport (2000) Little Big Man (1970) Luxo Jr. (1986) Moon Breath Beat (1980) Please Don’t Bury Me Alive! (1976) The Power and the Glory »

- Brian Welk

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The future is here in farewell trailer for ‘Parks and Rec’ Season 7

10 hours ago

I was a bit young to remember the glory days of Must See Comedy Thursdays on NBC, when Cheers, Seinfeld, Friends, Will and Grace and more ruled the airwaves. But my generation’s most impressive Thursday comedy stretch came with the four-count knockout punch of The Office, 30 Rock, Community and Parks and Recreation. The first three each left the air or were cancelled, and now the last remaining remnant of my college binge watching days is starting its final season.

Parks and Rec’s last season made our list of the Best TV Shows of 2014, so we’re excited for this final season jumping forward two years into the future to 2017. The 7th season of Parks and Rec premieres on January 13 and concludes on February 24 after premiering two new episodes a week. Watch the trailer below:

 

The post The future is here in farewell trailer for ‘Parks and Rec’ Season »

- Brian Welk

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Sony officially delays release of ‘The Interview’ following hacks

11 hours ago

Sony has cancelled their plans to release The Interview, issuing this statement via Deadline.

In light of the decision by the majority of our exhibitors not to show the film The Interview, we have decided not to move forward with the planned December 25 theatrical release. We respect and understand our partners’ decision and, of course, completely share their paramount interest in the safety of employees and theater-goers.

Sony Pictures has been the victim of an unprecedented criminal assault against our employees, our customers, and our business. Those who attacked us stole our intellectual property, private emails, and sensitive and proprietary material, and sought to destroy our spirit and our morale – all apparently to thwart the release of a movie they did not like. We are deeply saddened at this brazen effort to suppress the distribution of a movie, and in the process do damage to our company, our employees, and the American public. »

- Brian Welk

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‘Batman’ #37 is a whirling dervish of psychological horror

13 hours ago

Batman #37

Written by Scott Snyder (Backup written by James Tynion IV)

Pencilled by Greg Capullo (Backup art by John McCrea)

Inked by Danny Miki

Colors by Fco Plascencia (Backup colors by Michelle Madsen)

Published by DC Comics

Some of the best Batman stories are where a villain (usually someone like Scarecrow or Dr. Destiny) gets in his head, warps his sense of reality, and shows he’s not a mythic force of justice, but just a kid who misses his parents. Usually, by the end of the issue or episode, he has overcome his fear and deep-seated psychological problems and roars something like the classic Batman: The Animated Series line, “I am the night. I am vengeance. I am Batman.” This definitely doesn’t happen in Batman #37 as Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo continue to subvert everything which makes up the character of Batman, including his detective skills, contingency plans, »

- Logan Dalton

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Why You Should Be Watching: Black-ish

22 hours ago

Dre Johnson (Anthony Anderson) is a successful guy. He has an intelligent wife, adorable twin kids, and two moody teenagers. They all live together in a big house, and they all seem to get along quite nicely, although they tend to get into tiffs and spats that can usually be resolved amicably after twenty minutes or so. Dre, it would seem, is your typical sitcom protagonist, but with one exception: he’s black. Now, a show with an all-black main cast should not feel so revolutionary; it should be something normal, and we should be able to discuss it as any other show. But given the current (though slowly changing) state of television, which is replete with white antiheroes, it is nothing short of monumental to get a show about a group of likable characters who happen to be black.

Of course, the protagonists’ blackness is not incidental to the show. »

- Antonio Guzman

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‘The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies’ is a fitting farewell to Middle-Earth

16 December 2014 11:36 PM, PST

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

Written by Peter Jackson, Philippa Boyens, Fran Walsh and Guillermo del Toro (from the novel by J.R.R. Tolkien)

Directed by Peter Jackson

New Zealand/USA, 2014

 

To fully appreciate Peter Jackson’s last foray into Middle-Earth, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies, one must understand it’s actually two separate movies.  The first movie is a sour, pseudo-Shakespearean morality play that has nothing to do with Hobbits.  The second movie is a heartfelt rumination about friendship and self-sacrifice.  For those willing to overlook the sour for the sweet, there are great treasures to be found, as Jackson brings his trilogy to a suitably-epic conclusion.

Well, Bilbo (Martin Freeman) and his crew of Dwarves have really done it this time.  They ticked off the evil, treasure-hoarding dragon, Smaug (Benedict Cumberbatch), and now the good folks of Laketown must pay the price.  In a spectacular opening sequence, »

- J.R. Kinnard

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Sordid Cinema #90: ‘Tusk,’ ‘What We Do In The Shadows’ and ‘A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night’

16 December 2014 6:01 PM, PST

This week we sit down to discuss three of the most talked about genre offerings this year including A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night, an accomplished debut feature from U.S.-based writer-director Ana Lily Amirpour. But first we review Kevin Smith’s Tusk and What We Do in the Shadows, easily one of the most clever and genuinely funny spoof movies in quite some time.

Playlist:

Cloudboy – “Red Rubicon”

Federale – “Black Sunday”

Please give us a rating on Itunes. It would be very much appreciated!

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You can now hear our podcast on Stitcher Smart Radio.

Stitcher allows you to listen to your favorite shows directly from your iPhone, Android Phone, Kindle, Fire, and beyond. On/demand and on the go! »

- Sordid Cinema Podcast

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The Televerse #172- Holiday Omnibus 1 with Deepayan Sengupta

16 December 2014 3:44 PM, PST

With the year’s television winding down, our last regular podcast of the 2014 features a particularly light group of episodes. First Kate gives a quick genre roundup, including the midseason finales of The Flash, Arrow, Marvel’s Agents of Shield. Then we look at the week’s comedy, including the midseason finale of Jane the Virgin, a Christmas-themed Blackish and surprisingly un-holiday Bob’s Burgers. Last up are the dramas, including the penultimate episode of The Affair, the series finale of The Newsroom, and the season finale of the Audience Network’s underrated Kingdom. Afterward, SoS’s own Deepayan Sengupta is back to kick off a new recurring segment, our Holiday Omnibus. In the first installment, we look at three Christmas episodes: Chuck’s “Chuck vs. Santa Claus”, Supernatural’s “A Very Supernatural Christmas”, and Moral Orel’s “Best Christmas Ever.”

Our Week in Genre and Comedy (11:54-26: »

- Kate Kulzick

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‘The Wicked + the Divine’ #6 fleshes out Laura’s character

16 December 2014 10:34 AM, PST

The Wicked + the Divine #6

Written by Kieron Gillen

Art by Jamie McKelvie

Colors by Matthew Wilson

Published by Image Comics

If there is one word to describe The Wicked + the Divine #6 (WicDiv from now on) it would be: somber. The book begins in dreary Brockley, South London, and Matthew Wilson’s bright, gaudy palette has been muted except for the slight shimmer of Laura’s Inanna t-shirt. WicDiv #6 starts to explore Laura’s character in depth while also introducing readers to the never before seen (and cover subject) Inanna. Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie show Laura struggling to activate her powers bestowed by Luci while also digging into why she is such an obsessed fan of the god-like pop stars. WicDiv #6 is truly Gillen and McKelvie’s love letter to fandom of all sorts from the hilariously tacky “Lucifer died for our sins” shirts to another diagram spread of Laura’s messy fangirl infused bedroom, »

- Logan Dalton

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New on Video: ‘Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson’

16 December 2014 6:31 AM, PST

Buffalo Bill and the Indians, or Sitting Bull’s History Lesson

Written by Alan Rudolph and Robert Altman

Directed by Robert Altman

USA, 1976

The popularity of the Western, at one point America’s reigning genre champion, was starting to wane considerably by the mid-1960s and well into the 1970s. In part to keep the form alive, and in part to examine just want made this type of film what it once was and had now become, many filmmakers, Sam Peckinpah most notably, began to approach Westerns through a self-consciously analytical lens. These were Westerns that were, in one way or another, about Westerns themselves: what made them work, what their key tropes were, how could their conventions be subverted or updated, and how could this old-fashioned genre be made modern?

Director Robert Altman, no stranger to subverting conventions and thwarting expectations, had already tackled this in 1971, with McCabe & Mrs. Miller. »

- Jeremy Carr

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‘Xenosaga’ Revisited, Part 3: Thus Spoke Zarathustra (and the industry)

16 December 2014 3:00 AM, PST

Xenosaga, Episode III: Thus Spake Zarathustra

Monolith Soft

Namco Bandai

PS2

With the abridged and anticipated close of the Xenosaga series on the horizon, the final volume had the unenviable position of wrapping up two games of plot, starting and completing its own arc, and cramming in the major beats of the remaining three planned volumes. As such, it is ultimately the most uneven and overstuffed of trilogy, but also perhaps the most emotionally satisfying.

Picking up from the grim conclusion of Episode II, this saga-ending chronicle began with much table-setting. To start with, much of the cast is split up and spread apart at the outset of the game. Furthermore, there is a time jump, and even more new elements are introduced. For any newcomers who might be brave enough to jump in at this point, this was obviously a major problem.

Xenosaga had a very dense mythology, and »

- Mike Worby

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Watch an insightful video essay opposing ‘Boyhood’ with subversive best of the year list

15 December 2014 9:17 PM, PST

Richard Linklater’s 12 year spanning epic film Boyhood has been touted as the best film of the year by many critics for it’s authentic performances, uniquely compelling narrative and ambitious filmmaking process, all of which makes it a strong contender for the upcoming awards season. But as with anything that is so well regarded there are bound to be discerning opinions in order to incite challenging conversations or to shed light on lesser known films that often go unsung because they have been overshadowed by such a universally revered film. In the spirit of alternative programming Fandor presented a new video essay by Kevin B. Lee that spotlights ten films of the year that are ‘Better than Boyhood’ yet aren’t given as much attention. The video essay presents some interesting obscure and offbeat choices that may be worth a look.

Check out the video below:

The post Watch »

- Jean Pierre Diez

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The Affair, Ep. 1.09: “9″ brings big changes for certain characters

15 December 2014 9:10 PM, PST

Joshua Jackson, Ruth Wilson

The Affair, Season 1, Episode 9: “9″

Teleplay by Melanie Marnich and Kate Robin, Story by Dan LeFranc

Directed by Jeffrey Reiner

Airs Sundays at 10 pm Et on Showtime

While the end of the Soloways’ stay in Montauk seemed to signal the end of the affair between Alison and Noah, last week’s episode proved that, while the two may have tried to move on by being honest with their spouses, time had not dulled the affection the two seemed to feel for each other, nor had it lessened the desire for the affair’s continuation on either side. This week’s episode sees Alison and Noah take drastic steps to act on things they have wanted to do for a long time, in another compelling episode that further develops Noah and Alison, giving the audience the clearest look yet at what drives both individuals.

Alison’s actions »

- Deepayan Sengupta

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Rocky adds muscle to the American dream

15 December 2014 6:58 PM, PST

You know you’ve made it when they make a onesie in your honour. Rocky’s is iconically straightforward: it is black with a red hood, it shows a pair of red gloves hanging around the neck, and across the shoulders the word ‘Rocky’ is displayed in typically solid white capitals. There is something so simple and straightforward about the whole Rocky franchise that makes it irresistible – but there is more to the story than just the commercialisation.

In truth, Sylvester Stallone’s eponymous hero was a merchandising man’s dream – or to put it another way, Stallone captured something of the American dream in his humble, heart-as-big-as-a-lion hero: American dreams have always been in fashion.

Rocky’s old-time values, his decency and his uncomplicated determination to do the right thing were a perfect token of what it meant to be American in the 1980s. Rocky was straightforwardly one of »

- Kyle Reese

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‘Metro: Last Light’ is a haunting depiction of post-nuclear society

15 December 2014 5:18 PM, PST

Metro: Last Light

4A Games

Deep Silver

PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, PC, Mac, Linux

Like the studio it was developed in, the world of Metro: Last Light is a claustrophobic, dark, and chilling place. Set in the dingy and overgrown subway systems under a post-apocalyptic Moscow, Last Light, at its core, is about survival and the consequences of achieving it. Built by 4A Games, a small development house in Ukraine, Last Light’s tension-filled atmosphere and sense of scale is simply stunning, rivaling even the highest budgeted Aaa titles. The Metro is as equally terrifying as it is beautiful, and deserves a place among the most unique dystopian video game settings.

In 2013, a nuclear war left Russia’s surface scarred and infested with radiation, mutated haunts, and otherworldly creatures. Having nowhere else to go, humans sought refuge underground amidst Moscow’s sewers and equally grimy metro lines. For two decades, »

- Scott Langton

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Doctor Who Series 8 Retro Poster Collection

15 December 2014 5:11 PM, PST

Big Chief Studios Ltd. under official license from BBC Worldwide Limited, have released The Doctor Who Series 8 Retro Poster Collection which captures Peter Capaldi’s first series as the Doctor. The stunning new art collection in celebration of Series 8 of the hit TV series was created by artist Stuart Manning and not only pays homage to the designs of classic film posters but also comes packed in a bespoke envelope with string and washer closure, a cover letter, a certificate of authenticity, and two 8″ x 10″ black-and-white photo stills, just like theaters would receive to display in the lobby. The collection is limited to only 2000 sets worldwide.

Click here to purchase a print and get more info.

List of posters:

Deep Breath Into the Dalek Robot of Sherwood Listen Time Heist The Caretaker Kill the Moon Mummy on the Orient Express Flatline In the Forest of the Night Dark Water Death »

- Ricky

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The Televerse #172- Holiday Omnibus 1 with Deepayan Sengupta

15 December 2014 3:39 PM, PST

With the year’s television winding down, our last regular podcast of the 2014 features a particularly light group of episodes. First Kate gives a quick genre roundup, including the midseason finales of The Flash, Arrow, Marvel’s Agents of Shield. Then we look at the week’s comedy, including the midseason finale of Jane the Virgin, a Christmas-themed Blackish and surprisingly un-holiday Bob’s Burgers. Last up are the dramas, including the penultimate episode of The Affair, the series finale of The Newsroom, and the season finale of the Audience Network’s underrated Kingdom. Afterward, SoS’s own Deepayan Sengupta is back to kick off a new recurring segment, our Holiday Omnibus. In the first installment, we look at three Christmas episodes: Chuck’s “Chuck vs. Santa Claus”, Supernatural’s “A Very Supernatural Christmas”, and Moral Orel’s “Best Christmas Ever.”

Our Week in Genre and Comedy (11:54-26: »

- Kate Kulzick

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The trailer for Terrence Malick’s ‘Knight of Cups’ finally arrives

15 December 2014 1:35 PM, PST

 

The reclusive Terrence Malick is currently in the most prolific and productive phase of his career, but also his most polarizing. The Tree of Life may be the best movie of this decade, and its spiritual successor To The Wonder may be one of the director’s worst. Or depending on who you talk to, that assessment might be the exact opposite. Regardless, Malick remains the most curiously intriguing American director alive, and hours after it was announced that his latest film would be among the premieres at the Berlin Film Festival in February, a trailer has arrived for his latest film, Knight of Cups.

Knight of Cups stars Christian Bale, Natalie Portman, Imogen Poots, Cate Blanchett and about a dozen other name actors who probably only appear in voiceover narration or background conversation to Emmanuel Lubezki’s (The Tree of Life, Gravity, Birdman) elliptical camera. This is a much darker trailer of surreal, »

- Brian Welk

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