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The 100 Greatest Nintendo Games Pt. 1

6 hours ago

Nintendo celebrated its 125th Anniversary last year, with the company founded on 23rd September 1889 in Kyoto, where its headquarters remain. The company has had an extraordinary history, originally producing handmade handful playing cards and several small niche businesses (including a cab service and luxury hotels), but since 1977, Nintendo has grown into one of the world’s most prolific and beloved video game makers.

Nintendo became a household name outside of Japan in 1985 with the release of the Nintendo Entertainment System. The best-selling gaming console of its time, the Nes helped revitalize the Us video game industry following the video game crash of 1983. Nintendo has since been the most enduring and influential company in the medium and its consoles, branding and innovative game achievements have given the company a momentous status in popular culture. And so 30 years after the Nes hit North American shores, we’ve decided to compile a list »

- Staff

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‘Indie Game: The Movie’ is a fascinating look at the creative obsession with video games

7 hours ago

Indie Game: The Movie

Directed by: James Swirsky, Lisanne Pajot

Written by:  James Swirsky, Lisanne Pajot

Starring: Edmund McMillen, Tommy Refenes, Phil Fish, Jonathan Blow

USA, 2012

With the documentary rooted as independent as its subjects, Indie Game: The Movie started as a Kickstarter project and went all the way to Sundance in 2012, with aspirations gripping the palms of Swirsky and Pajot’s hands. The film primarily follows two indie game projects, Super Meat Boy and Fez, as their creators struggle through video game development, from their highest highs to their lowest lows. In between their stories, time with Jonathan Blow of Braid is spent to emphasize how life after success isn’t always what its cracked up to be. Blow talks about being confused for months after Braid came out, because many people simply took the game for face value without appreciating the plot nuances articulated in painstaking detail by »

- Christopher Clemente

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Sundance 2015: ‘Z for Zachariah’ is B for Boring

16 hours ago

Z for Zachariah

Written by Nissar Modi

Directed by Craig Zobel

USA, 2015

Pop music warns us that you can’t hurry love.  Apparently, you can’t hurry the apocalypse, either.  The new sci-fi flick, Z for Zachariah, has all the hallmarks of a Young Adult schmaltz-fest, but too much depressing reality to appeal to its target audience.  Genre miscalculations aside, this movie fails because of the lethargic pacing and a lack of romantic tension between its three impossibly-handsome leads.  The apocalypse has never been so boring.

Ann (Margot Robbie) is the last woman on earth.  Luckily, she’s beautiful, resourceful, and has an adorable doggie that disappears whenever you don’t want it around.  Of course, none of these qualities had anything to do with her survival.  She lives in a nondescript house nestled in the mountains that has been spared from the extinction-level radiation that befell the entire planet. »

- J.R. Kinnard

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‘Bitch Planet’ #2 is a Bold Breath of Fresh Air

16 hours ago

Bitch Planet #2


Writer: Kelly Sue DeConnick

Art and Cover: Valentine De Landro

Colorist: Cris Peter

Letterer: Clayton Cowles

Publisher: Image Comics

As comic book readership becomes ever more aware of problems within popular media, it’s been harder and harder to find a book that isn’t problematic. Kelly Sue DeConnick’s ongoing independent book, Bitch Planet, is a gem in the slowly improving realm of comic books and geek culture. Only two issues in, it’s of course, impossible to say whether Bitch Planet is entirely non-problematic, but as of last week’s issue, and seems far more indicative of equality and representation than many other books. At least this is the case when the reader is old enough for strong language, nudity, and certainly violence. This book is not for the kids! Nor is it for those whom become incensed immediately upon hearing the “f word” (feminism). For those who are more open-minded, »

- Julia Michels

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‘Life is Strange’ is a wondrously realized and effectively nuanced slice of life

17 hours ago

Life is Strange: Episode One–Chrysalis

Dontnod Entertainment

Square-Enix

PS3, PS4, Xbox 360, Xbox One, PC

In many ways Life is Strange, the new serialized adventure title from Dontnod and Square-Enix, has set the benchmark pretty high for future episodic releases. With it’s gorgeous presentation, high production values, and tons of replayability, this is going to be a tough game for the format to top for a long time to come.

Telling the tale of  a newly minted adult returning to her hometown, Life is Strange is very much a typical coming of age story. What’s special about this particular effort though is the amount of detail which is put into the details of our protagonist’s world. After a thrilling and ambitious prologue set amid the endless dreamscape of our central character, Max(ine), the game opens in a classroom and immediately gives you access to an almost daunting amount of information. »

- Mike Worby

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Sundance 2015: Blythe Danner is outstanding in charming ‘I’ll See You in My Dreams’

17 hours ago

I’ll See You in My Dreams

Written by Marc Basch and Brett Haley

Directed by Brett Haley

USA, 2015

There’s an intriguing fakeout near the beginning of I’ll See You In My Dreams if you’ve read the plot synopsis of Brett Haley’s film, which reads: “A sudden loss disrupts Carol’s orderly life, propelling her into the dating world for the first time in 20 years. Finally living in the present tense, she finds herself swept up in not one but two unexpected relationships that challenge her assumptions about what it means to grow old.”

When Carol (Blythe Danner) wakes up alone in bed with her dog Hazel, you assume it is her husband that is gone. That’s not the case, as he died 20 years earlier. It’s her dog that dies, putting the plot into motion. Sadly, Blythe Danner doesn’t go full John Wick »

- Dylan Griffin

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Sundance 2015: ”71′ is a tense and well constructed thriller

18 hours ago

’71

Written by Gregory Burke

Directed by Yann Demange

United Kingdom, 2014

The time is 1971, and the place is Belfast – both caught up in the fire of The Troubles. Each block in these streets is littered with warfare; cars are on fire and each person carries the weariness of living in such an environment. The plot of director Yann Demange’s action thriller kicks off when Gary Hook (Jack O’Connell), a young British soldier serving in Belfast, is accidentally left behind from his unit during a riot, and must survive the night while Ira forces search for him and his unit tries to recover him.

Jack O’Connell shows again that he can carry a film as a leading man. He reminds you of Steve McQueen and as there’s not a lot to Gary’s character O’Connell’s presence becomes integral to the audience’s investment in the film. »

- Dylan Griffin

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‘Free to Play’ explores the alienation of hardcore gaming

18 hours ago

Free to Play

Produced and Distributed by The Valve Corporation

USA, 2014

As a hobby, gaming can create some interesting and disquieting juxtapositions to our existence. On the one hand, it is an activity which stimulates the brain, expands the boundaries of critical thinking, and allows people to de-stress or work through the problems and frustrations of their day in a world where the consequences of their decisions are not so dire as their reality. Despite these positive factors however, gaming is still often frowned upon by a vast degree of society as a childish activity which is not to be taken seriously.

As a fairly young medium, gaming and its proponents are used to this sort of judgment, mostly content to shrug it off for the time being and wait for the inevitable day when gaming becomes the norm for all of society, much like what occurred in the past with film and television. »

- Mike Worby

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‘Harakiri’ blends action with a philosophical and critical look at the bushido code

21 hours ago

Harakiri

Written by Shinobu Hashimoto and Yasuhiko Takiguchi

Directed by Masaki Kobayashi

Japan, 1962

In the early 17th century, the Iyi clan abides by the bushido code to the letter in all its facets, sepukku, the traditional samurai suicide ceremony by which a warrior disembowels himself before being decapitated, being no exception. It is on a bright sunny day that one Tsugumo Hanshirô (Tatsuya Nakadai) arrives at the Iyi estate, currently run by Saitô Kageyu (Rentarô Mikuni), to plead for space in order to perform a honourable act of seppuku. He claims that the regional peace has led to unemployment, and rather live like a dog, suicide as ordained by bushido seems preferable. Knowledgeable of the occurrences of bluff requests made by other ronin samurai that were merely looking for pittance, Saitô is suspicious of Hanshirô’s motives and begins to relate a recent story of another, younger former warrior (Akira Ishihama »

- Edgar Chaput

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“All Aboard”: Top Ten Bus-Related Moments in the Movies

21 hours ago

Taking public transportation on the bus in everyday life is essential for workers worldwide as we need to make that daily grinding trek to the workplace, shopping malls, school, doctor’s appointment or whatever our destination may be at the moment. In particular, there is a love/hate relationship with buses as it presents all sort of social challenges: anxiety, chattiness, impatience, friendliness, kindness, anti-socialism, invasive behavior, alienation, nervousness, sense of unity, etc.

Well in the world of movies the bus-related experience can be more colorful and adventurous for the imagination at heart. Thus, it brings up this prolonged thought: what is your favorite or memorable moments dealing with buses on the big screen? Does it compare adequately to the triumphs or tragedies that overshadow or downplay your dealings with real-life bus-related interaction?

In “All Aboard”: Top Ten Bus-Related Moments in the Movies we will look at a handful of selected scenes, »

- Frank Ochieng

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Banshee, Ep. 3.04: “Real Life is the Nightmare” is the calm before the storm

22 hours ago

Banshee, Season 3: Episode 4 – “Real Life is the Nightmare”

Written by Justin Britt-Gibson

Directed by Magnus Martens

Airs Friday nights at 10 on Cinemax

Considering the ending of this episode and last week’s unfathomably entertaining Banshee entry, “Real Life is the Nightmare” has the misfortune of being sandwiched between television that redefines high adrenaline. Instead, what we get–among several other things–is a quieter meditation on parenting that shows some of the difficulties that Carrie, Gordon and Hood have either had to overcome or are currently trying to overcome.

There’s an easy dichotomy to point out between the way that Gordon is seen literally running and Carrie spends much of the episode figuratively running. “We need to do better,” Gordon tells Carrie. But whereas the Gordon of a few weeks ago would be saying those words out of frustration (or straight-up aimed at Carrie and worded as “You »

- Sean Colletti

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‘Earth 2: World’s End’ #17: too little too late

30 January 2015 8:32 PM, PST

Earth 2: World’s End #17

Written by Daniel H. Wilson, Marguerite Bennett, & Mike Johnson

Art by Scott McDaniel, Robson Rocha & Guillermo Ortego, Eduardo Pansica & Paul Neary, Jorge Jiminez, R. B. Silva & Walden Wong

Published by DC Comics

If there’s one way that World’s End in any way thematically follows Earth 2, it’s that the world is perpetually on the verge of complete destruction. The ungodly battle between the Furies of Apokolips and the Earth Avatars might be over but that doesn’t mean anyone, even the audience is spared. Now the heroes face the unironically named Deathspawn, a monster with the power to kill the very heart of Earth 2. Big Barda leads an assault into the last remaining human outpost with an army of “proto-Furies” naturally they’re an army of faceless minions that have never been foreshadowed in anyway, because that would involve effort. »

- Grant Raycroft

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Danny Trejo’s Hilarious Brady Bunch Super Bowl Ad

30 January 2015 8:15 PM, PST

Snickers released its Super Bowl commercial early this year, and it shows Steve Buscemi and Danny Trejo doing a character-actor twist on The Brady Bunch. The latest riff on the candy bar’s ongoing “You’re Not You When You’re Hungry” campaign has Trejo pretending to be the famous small-screen daughter while showing off his trademark tattoos and throwing a temper tantrum. While Trejo’s performance is downright hysterical, Buscemi does a better job channelling Jan’s typical bitterness in the famous line: “Marcia! Marcia! Marcia!” The ad will debut on the small screen during Super Bowl Xlix, which kicks off Sunday at 6:30 p.m. Et on NBC.

The post Danny Trejo’s Hilarious Brady Bunch Super Bowl Ad appeared first on Sound On Sight. »

- Ricky

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The Definitive Movies of 1995

30 January 2015 8:01 PM, PST

10. Waterworld

Directed by: Kevin Reynolds

It could be the flop of all flops. At the time, “Waterworld” was the most expensive film ever made. Starring Kevin Costner, “Waterworld” is a science-fiction/fantasy film taking place roughly 500 years after the polar ice caps melted in the beginning of the 21st century, effectively covering the entire world with water. Dirt has become a commodity and an unknown traveler named “the Mariner” (Costner) is trying to find anywhere to trade his stash. The catch: he’s a mutant, with gills, allowing him to breathe underwater. He is joined by a woman named Helen (Jeannie Tripplehorn) and child named Enola (Tina Majorino) with an elaborate map tattooed on her back. They sail the world and encounter various groups of survivors. They are pursued by a group of evil forces, led by an eye-patched man called “the Deacon” (Dennis Hopper). The special effects are actually pretty impressive, »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Definitive Movies of 1995

30 January 2015 8:01 PM, PST

20. Dead Man Walking

Directed by: Tim Robbins

Susan Sarandon earned herself an Oscar for her work in “Dead Man Walking,” a film directed by her then husband, Tim Robbins. She plays Sister Prejean, a nun who befriends a death row inmate named Matthew (Oscar nominated Sean Penn) as they confide in one another and build a convincing relationship as the days and hours tick down until his execution. Robbins intercuts the scenes with Sarandon and Penn with moments of the actual crime taking place, creating a storytelling rift that both supports and contradicts moments within the film, creating two very carefully drawn and developed characters. In addition to visiting him regularly, Prejean begins the crusade to find him a lawyer to make an appeal, doing all she can to delay his sentence being carried out. But, as she meets the families of the victims, she finds herself torn between right »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Definitive Movies of 1995

30 January 2015 8:01 PM, PST

30. Sense and Sensibility

Directed by: Ang Lee

Ang Lee has gone in about eight different directions in terms of genre. His resume includes “The Ice Storm,” “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” Hulk,” “Brokeback Mountain,” “Life of Pi,” and this delightful Jane Austen adaptation, starring Emma Thompson, Hugh Grant, Alan Rickman, and young Kate Winslet. “Sense and Sensibility” took home the Oscar for Adapted Screenplay for the story of the Dashwood family, a mother widowed and left in difficult circumstances after her husband has left his fortune to his first wife, instead of his current one. So Mrs. Dashwood (Gemma Jones) and her daughters Fanny, Marianne, and Elinor (Harriet Walter, Winslet, Thompson) have to find a way to survive in a world ruled by men and the rules that seem to create obstacle after obstacle for them. Unfortunately, given the era, they are viewed as “unmarryable,” since they have no fortune and no prospects. »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Definitive Movies of 1995

30 January 2015 8:01 PM, PST

40. Empire Records

Directed by: Allan Moyle

Ah, the coming-of-age story. There was no sub-genre more hijacked for a quick buck in the 1990′s. In between the good ones (“Dazed and Confused,” “Boyz in the Hood”), the cheesy ones (“She’s All That,” “She Drives Me Crazy”), and the under-appreciated ones (“The Man in the Moon,” “Angus”), there were the middling ones that, if anything, boasted a cast that would go on to bigger, better things. Enter “Empire Records,” which is not only a coming-of-age story, but one that takes place at a record store, no less. Talk about the double dip. The entire film takes place over the course of one day, focusing on the employees, played by Anthony Lapaglia, Ethan Embry, Renee Zellweger, Rory Cochrane, and Liv Tyler. The independent record store is in Delaware – the hot spot of American music – and sees Joe (Lapaglia) allowing night manager Lucas »

- Joshua Gaul

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The Definitive Movies of 1995

30 January 2015 8:01 PM, PST

The 1990′s introduced the world to Quentin Tarantino, saw the creation of the Nc-17 rating, and began the slow call toward fully computer animated films. It began the slow (still slow) movement toward a more diverse industry, with the first African-American director earning an Oscar nomination (John Singleton for “Boyz in the Hood”). And the year after one of the greatest years in the history of film, 1995 came plodding along, trying to keep up. So, for the first definitive list of 2015, we are going to look back 20 years at a year that, at first glance, doesn’t look so hot. It’s ripe with flops, but it’s also full of debuts, trailblazing beginnings, and better films than it gets credit for. But, the caveat still stands: this is not a “best of” list. In fact, there are a lot of bad movies on this list. But, they are movies that made a cultural impact, »

- Joshua Gaul

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Obsessed with Pop Culture: Best of the Week

30 January 2015 7:33 PM, PST

Sundance 2015

Our crew is hard at work covering the Sundance Film Festival. Here is the first batch of review with more to come.

‘The D Train’ promises a fun, twisty ride Sundance 2015: ‘A Walk in the Woods’ will have you running for the exits Sundance 2015: ‘Slow West’ is a tense and thoughtful revisionist western Sundance 2015: ‘Princess’ is one of Sundance’s best Sundance 2015: Maybe the dingos should eat ‘Strangerland’ Sundance 2015: Ben Mendelsohn is the jackpot in otherwise middling ‘Mississippi Grind’ Sundance 2015: ‘Me & Earl & the Dying Girl’ an emotional, honest and hilarious experience Sundance 2015: ‘The End of the Tour’ a quiet, affecting primer on the life of David Foster Wallace Sundance 2015: ‘Cop Car’ is an instant Americana genre film classic Sundance 2015: ‘Girlhood’ rivals Linklater’s opus Sundance 2015: ‘Knock Knock’ sees Eli Roth and Keanu Reeves offer camp glory Sundance 2015: ‘Eden »

- Ricky

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‘The Legend of Cambo’ is a must-see for Korine fans

30 January 2015 6:23 PM, PST

The Legend of Cambo

Harmony Korine, the director behind such films as Spring Breakers, Mister Lonely and Gummo is starting the new year off right, with a ten minute documentary. The film, The Legend of Cambo, is part of the Profiles series for Vice. The episode follows Cambo, a man who lived alone in the woods of Alabama for two years following a nasty divorce between his parents. His reclusion to the woods was a means of escape, a way to focus his energy on nothing but his own survival, but ended up marking his transition into adulthood and maturity beyond his years.

Photo credit: 1

The post ‘The Legend of Cambo’ is a must-see for Korine fans appeared first on Sound On Sight. »

- Caitlin Marceau

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