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7 articles


Cinematographer Thomas Scott Stanton on Shooting Matt Sobel’s Sundance Next Picture, Take Me to the River

7 hours ago

Director of photography Thomas Scott Stanton comes to Matt Sobel’s Sundance Next button-pusher Take Me to the River from a diverse background. Born in Maine, he spent much of his childhood in Guam and the South Pacific. In Washington D.C. he founded the Green Barrel skate shops, and he still directs skate videos in addition to acting and working as a photographer. When it comes to Sobel’s film, which tells the unsettling story of a gay teenager confronting family secrets at an annual reunion, Stanton connected with the first-time director over Skype and, using the Red Epic M, brought a […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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Cinematographer Tom Garner on Shooting Sundance Feature The Strongest Man

7 hours ago

Making their feature film debuts at Sundance are director Kenny Riches and cinematographer Tom Garner for the offbeat and ingratiating Miami-set buddy movie (of sorts), The Strongest Man. Artist and metalworker Robert Lorrie plays Beef, a Cuban construction worker set out on a small-scale spiritual odyssey across the streets and into the apartments of Miami. He’s accompanied by his pal Conan, played by YouTube star Freddie Wong, and their adventures have a shambling charm reminiscent a bit of Rick Linklater’s Slacker. The considerable appeal of the on-screen performers is echoed by Garner’s cinematography, which sees contemporary Miami in a way […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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Sundance Announces Groundbreaking Transparency Project at #ArtistServices Workshop

9 hours ago

Data — it’s the most coveted property in independent film. While studios base their greenlight decisions on finely-honed models derived from the financial performance of numerous other pictures, many independent filmmakers perilously based investor pitches and distribution decisions on anecdotes and hearsay. What used to be simple extrapolation (“If that film grossed X, it probably did Y on home video”) has become a near impossible exercise in the age of digital distribution, in which paltry box-office returns hide “the real numbers” — a dizzying matrix of VOD stats, download figures, Netflix license fees and more and more obscure sub-categories of […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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Sundance 2015, Dispatch 3: The Wolfpack, Western and Dreamcatcher

10 hours ago

I stopped taking notes after a while during The Wolfpack; I was feeling a bit too disturbed to keep at it and it seemed somewhat besides the point. Crystal Moselle’s first feature follows the Angulo brothers: six siblings, born to father Oscar, who for something like 15 years never left their Les apartment, save sporadic supervised summer walks. Oscar named them all Hare Krishna style — Govinda, Bhagavan, etc. — and amassed a collection of some 5,000 films, their sole meaningful connection to the outside world. They were homeschooled and lived in a state of fear — Oscar’s past/present (?) […] »

- Vadim Rizov

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Cinematographer Jean-Philippe Bernier on Shooting the Sundance Picture, Turbo Kid

10 hours ago

From the Rkss filmmaker’s collective (Anouk Whissell, François Simard, and Yoann-Karl Whissell) comes the Sundance Park City at Midnight selection Turbo Kid, described by the directors as like “some lost crazy kids’ movie from the 1980s that’s somehow has just been rediscovered.” Post-apocalypse gore, BMX bikes and Michael IronsideTurbo Kid looks back to iconic ’80s kids adventures to inspire, again from the filmmakers, “a whole new generation of warped kids (and crazy adults).” Below, cinematographer Jean-Philippe Bernier talks about how he got those retro looks and summoned the requisite nostalgia on a small budget. Turbo Kid premieres Monday, […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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Five Questions for Welcome to Leith Directors Michael Beach Nichols & Christopher K. Walker

10 hours ago

Documentary has a rich history of films by filmmakers who must honestly engage subjects with odious views. Directors Michael Beach Nichols and Christopher Walker stumbled across one such fellow in Craig Cobb, a white supremacist with a devious and possibly quite legal plan to produce a white power enclave in the American heartland. Premiering at Sundance in the Documentary Competition, their Welcome to Leith chronicles the story of the town of Leith against Cobb but also, implicitly, their own story of engaging their subject — who says he’s available for Skype interviews after the premiere. Welcome to Leith premieres Monday, […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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Cinematographer Benjamin Kasulke on Shooting Guy Maddin’s The Forbidden Room

13 hours ago

Ben Kasulke has literally dozens of credits on his iMDb page, but running throughout his career are collaborations with two directors: Lynn Shelton and, more recently, Guy Maddin. And what’s remarkable is how different those collaborations are. With Shelton, Kasulke affects a seemingly casual, on-the-fly naturalism, never allowing his cinematography to deflect from the actors’ moments. With Maddin, however, Kasulke is working in service to an entirely different aesthetic, one in which a film’s look is part and parcel of its meanings. In Maddin’s work, Kasulke’s lensing takes us far away from the present, back to times when film both […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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7 articles



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