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18 articles


Cannes 2015: Five Questions For Tale of Tales Star Salma Hayek

5 hours ago

Salma Hayek rarely picks up her cell phone when the number is unlisted. But one day she did so while driving around Los Angeles, and the man on the other end was Italian director Matteo Garrone. Having been introduced to modern Italian cinema by her friend Valeria Golina, Hayek was flabbergasted. Garrone’s films Gomorrah and Reality were two of her favorite recent pictures. Not only that, but Garrone was offering her the role in a period film bringing to life the tales of 17th century Neapolitan scribe Giambattista Basile. She would play the role of a Spanish queen, the film would […] »

- Ariston Anderson

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Cannes 2015: Five Questions For Tale of Tales‘ Vincent Cassel

6 hours ago

He’s played a troubled youth in the Paris ghettos in La Haine, a vengeful husband in Irreversible, and an abusive ballet company director in Black Swan. One pattern is clear with French actor Vincent Cassel: he works with directors of a special breed who can’t be boxed up neatly within a genre. His latest Cannes film is no exception. Cassel partnered with Italian director Matteo Garrone to play the role of a casanova Medieval king who’s always on the search for his next sexual conquest in Tale of Tales. Based upon the stories of Giambattista Basile, Europe’s original fairytale scribe, […] »

- Ariston Anderson

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“I’m Going Back to My Horror Film Roots”: Abel Ferrara Launches Siberia at Cannes 2015

10 hours ago

Indie maestro Abel Ferrara launched his latest film project in Cannes this week with his first ever foray into Kickstarter. Siberia, a new film with Willem Dafoe, explores the language of dreams, using the subconscious as a form of language. “There’s nothing more horrific than your own dreams and nightmares,” Ferrara promised the crowd of assembled journalists gathered on the top of the Silencio club in Cannes. “I’m going back to that kind of filmmaking, to my horror film roots.” He’s hoping to raise half a million dollars to begin financing for the new film. “This is Willem being Willem,” […] »

- Ariston Anderson

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Watch: A Brief History of Motion Capture’s Past and Present

10 hours ago

With Robert Zemeckis back in the live-action world and James Cameron taking his time to gear up Avatars 2-4, there’s not been much discussion lately of motion capture. That doesn’t mean it’s gone away, and this video from Vice’s The Creator Project is a nicely succinct overview of what motion capture’s evolved from and where it’s going next; the participation of the technicians behind the technology is a big plus. The baby project described and shown at the end may just be the one that crosses the uncanny valley. »

- Filmmaker Staff

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The New York Times Announces It Will No Longer Guarantee Coverage of New Releases

21 May 2015 1:15 PM, PDT

Variety just announced that The New York Times will no longer guarantee critical coverage of every weekly release throughout the five boroughs, perhaps putting an end to, if not a damper on, the long debated practice of four walling. While the decision — gleaned via an email A.O. Scott sent to independent distributors — will likely see smaller companies pulling back on the financially draining one-week theatrical runs and shifting their attention toward VOD, it also ensures a considerable drop in profile for these lesser known releases. A handful of sites like The Dissolve have begun to fold VOD releases into their coverage, but it doesn’t appear that The Times will be […] »

- Sarah Salovaara

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Tickled: The Farewell Party

21 May 2015 10:26 AM, PDT

Such a rare thrill to see films with seniors who have credible back stories and channel a lifetime of experience toward the resolution of whatever issues they currently face. The lead characters in The Farewell Party, a delightfully dark Israeli comedy (perhaps adorable tragicomedy is more on point), are full-blooded humans, not vampiric nasties or one-dimensional goody two shoes. They converse with delight and share their joys, but they also threaten, backbite, and blackmail. Each has attachments, with ups and downs — not so different from young people, as it turns out. At about the halfway point, a group of […] »

- Howard Feinstein

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Win a Pass to Ifp’s Class Series “The Where of Storytelling: Creating the Location Based Experience”

21 May 2015 9:32 AM, PDT

“The Where of Storytelling: Creating the Location Based Experience” is a class series conceived by the Made in NY Media Center by Ifp exploring site-specific storytelling – from interactive film to experiential design for commercial clients, location adds a new level of experience to media projects. The program consists of a Case Study and overview of locative storytelling featuring interactive filmmaker Lance Weiler and Jake Barton, founder of award-winning museum experience designers Local Projects (June 9); a Writing Workshop: draft a location-based story & refine your project through inspiring design exercises and peer critiques (June 13, 14 & 27); and a Beacon Tech Workshop: install a location-specific experience & work with developers to learn to […] »

- Filmmaker Staff

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Cannes 2015 Critics’ Notebook 2: Love and Youth

21 May 2015 8:17 AM, PDT

Quick, try to describe Irreversible and Enter the Void writer-director Gaspar Noé without relying on the words “controversial,” “provocateur,” “bad boy” (or, more Gallically put, “enfant terrible“) or “transgressive.” Noé’s latest potential scandal-maker, Love — hotly anticipated after smutty publicity materials teased it as a 3D art-house porno, complete with semen-sticky title treatment — was surprisingly softer and less shocking than anyone expected from last night’s midnight premiere. It’s also callow, shallow and numbingly insipid, despite its explicit mélange of blowjobs, threesomes and orgies. (Seriously, how does one make hardcore fucking more vanilla than Fifty Shades of Grey?) In a two-hour-plus scrapbook of flashbacks and time jumps forward, a […] »

- Aaron Hillis

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Watch: Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach Fundraise for Orson Welles’ Final Film

20 May 2015 1:00 PM, PDT

You’ve probably heard about the latest push to finally produce a finished, edited version of Orson Welles’ uncompleted final film, The Other Side of the Wind. In support of an Indiegogo campaign to raise funds, Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach have taped a video message urging you to just contribute already. Unusually for the famously controlling Anderson, he appears to have shot the video handheld selfie style. »

- Filmmaker Staff

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Ifp Partners With Film London To Bring UK Producers to Film Week

20 May 2015 10:46 AM, PDT

Ifp has announced a partnership with Film London to bring two UK-based producers to Independent Film Week to partake in the No-Borders International Co-Production Market. Each year during Film Week, 35 producers with projects that have at least 20% funding in place participate in the No-Borders section to network with buyers, sales agents and financiers, in order to get their films off the ground. No-Borders has previously partnered with the likes of the Berlinale, Venice Biennale, and TorinoFilmLab, to allow international producers to partake in the Us-based market. This is Film London’s first Us partnership designed to benefit and foster UK producers. […] »

- Filmmaker Staff

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Watch: Bill Murray on David Letterman’s First NBC Show, 1982

20 May 2015 9:04 AM, PDT

Given the overwhelming surplus of articles about David Letterman’s retirement, career and final show tonight, there barely needs to be anything said here. Bill Murray was the guest on last night’s penultimate show, which is fitting, as he was the first guest on Letterman’s first NBC show in 1982. They antagonized each other, watched a panda video and then Murray performed Olivia Newton-John’s “Physical,” which is basically everything you need for good television. »

- Vadim Rizov

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“The Idea of Bringing a Camera into an Interview is Unfathomable to Me”: Bianca Giaever on the She Does Podcast

20 May 2015 6:00 AM, PDT

Bianca Giaever is a radio producer, filmmaker and our youngest guest to date. You may have heard her on RadioLab or This American Life or seen her short films on NPR, The New York Times or featured as Vimeo Staff Picks. She recently won a Webby for Videos 4 U, a new series she’s heading for This American Life. In this episode, Bianca talks about her inherited curiosity and inclination to talk to strangers as well as how her personal life, questions and struggles influence the themes of her work. We talk about the paralyzing effect of your first successful […] »

- Elaine Sheldon and Sarah Ginsburg

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Web Series Pilot Premiere: Alix Lambert’s Prison Zoo

19 May 2015 11:50 AM, PDT

Following her recent Crime: the Animated Series, director Alix Lambert continues her focus on illegal acts and their culture by embracing a new animation style — stop-motion claymation — and a more fantastic metaphorical premise. In this premiere pilot episode for a new web series, Lambert — both a filmmaker and frequent Filmmaker contributor — partners with animator Tim Grant and actor and writer Damian Baldet to create a humorously melancholic tale of a fennec fox and sloth stuck in a place you don’t want to be: Prison Zoo. Prison Zoo is currently part of Lambert’s exhibition of the same […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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Dancing in Tungsten Light: Dp Rob Hardy on Ex Machina

19 May 2015 10:25 AM, PDT

In writer/director Alex Garland’s Ex Machina, a coder (Domhnall Gleeson) for a Google-esque tech giant is summoned to the remote compound of the company’s CEO (Oscar Isaac) in order to test his latest creation – an alluring humanoid robot named Ava (Alicia Vikander). Gleeson’s mission is to conduct a Turing test – a series of questions designed to determine if a form of artificial intelligence has achieved human consciousness. Ex Machina cinematographer Rob Hardy was faced with a similar mission – convincing audiences of Ava’s humanity despite her obvious mechanical parts. Hardy talked to Filmmaker about using everything from lens choices […] »

- Matt Mulcahey

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Nowhere To Go But Up: The 6th Annual Eastern Oregon Film Festival

19 May 2015 8:00 AM, PDT

“A good movie is like a blast to the head,” growled Dusty Decker — musician, actor, purveyor of the Albino Bumblebee (goat’s milk, Jack Daniels, honey) and something of a local legend in the valley of La Grande, Oregon. His off the cuff commentary, though in jest, nonetheless proved a perfect transition from bb gun toting and hatchet throwing to a roundtable discussion on independent film beneath the towering trees of his backyard. We were all there for the sixth annual Eastern Oregon Film Festival, and the conversation began with the occasion. Just as any old chum can go out and shoot a film […] »

- Sarah Salovaara

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Five Questions for Love Comes Later Director and La Semaine de la Critique Selectee, Sonejuhi Sinha

19 May 2015 7:00 AM, PDT

To premiere at La Semaine de la Critique is a singular achievement in itself. For one thing, it comes with the boasting rights of having triumphed through a discerning selection process, one that whittles over 1,700 submissions down to a lineup of merely 20 films. For another, as the competition running parallel to the Cannes Film Festival since 1962, La Semaine’s commitment to showcasing and nurturing new global talent through a combination of selectivity and exceptional personal attention has established it as one of the most valued platforms of exposure for budding filmmakers. But for New York-based editor-turned-writer/director Sonejuhi Sinha, […] »

- Anisha Jhaveri

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Cannes 2015: Five Questions for Carol Director Todd Haynes

18 May 2015 12:45 PM, PDT

Todd Haynes reteams with Cate Blanchett, after 2007’s I’m Not There, for his latest Palme d’Or contender Carol. Based on Patricia Highsmith’s semi-autobiographical novel The Price of Salt, Rooney Mara plays shopgirl Therese, who falls in love with the older, married Carol (Blanchett) in the ’50s. The two embark on a road trip, which culminates in Carol’s husband blackmailing her with the liaison to prevent her from having custody over their daughter. Edward Lachman’s cinematography is rich in period detail. And two masters at their craft bring the challenging characters to life, ending the film in a final wordless scene […] »

- Ariston Anderson

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Cannes 2015: Five Questions for Tale of Tales Director Matteo Garrone

18 May 2015 8:09 AM, PDT

Italian director Matteo Garrone is no stranger to Cannes. He picked up the Grand Prix twice for his previous films Gomorrah (2008), exploring the Camorra mafia, and Reality (2012), about society’s obsession with reality TV. With his third film in competition, Garrone has once again completely switched gears, debuting his first period piece and his first film shot in English, Tale of Tales. Based on the fairytales of Giambattista Basile, the film has been the buzz of Cannes with its rich storytelling, outstanding performances, and lush cinematography. Going back to the raw and oftentimes brutal storytelling of early fairytales (Basile’s […] »

- Ariston Anderson

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18 articles



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