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‘The Summit’ Review: Christian Slater Is Enjoyably Smarmy In Santiago Mitre’s Political Drama — Cannes 2017

27 minutes ago

“There’s nothing worse than a politician without ambition.” So says the newly inaugurated president of Argentina in Santiago Mitre’s “The Summit.” It’s the kind of boilerplate dialogue you could hear in any broody portrait of politics and power, but it sounds particularly egregious coming from this one. Despite its larger festival platform and starrier cast, “The Summit” remains a wan, frustrating, and narratively unambitious follow-up to Mitre’s Critics Week prizewinner, “Paulina.”

With big-name actors and top-level access, Mitre’s third feature is an impressively scaled-up production. “The Summit” opens in the halls of the Casa Rosada, the sprawling presidential palace in the heart of Buenos Aires, and Mitre shot in the actual palace. As the steadicam rigs sweep from the back entrance to the kitchen to the gilded corridors of power, it introduces us to the characters who make the country run. First among equals is »


- Ben Croll

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Jon Stewart and HBO Made The Right Call to Kill Their Animated Cable News Parody, and Here’s Why

59 minutes ago

For Jon Stewart, the idea seemed like a natural fit: An animated daily show parodying cable news that could comment on current events in real time.

But after a lengthy development, Stewart and HBO officially pulled the plug this Tuesday. And it was probably for the best.

As part of its 4-year deal with Stewart, HBO built him an animation studio in New Jersey. He started working with 3D graphics company Otoy on the creation of short-form video projects.

Read More: Jon Stewart’s HBO Animated News Project Has Been Dropped

The idea: Stewart would come up with a way to produce animated shorts online throughout the day that would post almost immediately after news arises. A web destination (think “The Onion”) would be created, and the shorts would be collected into a half-hour version that would also air on the linear HBO channel.

“It allows him to comment in »


- Michael Schneider

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Jon Stewart’s HBO Animated News Project Has Been Dropped

5 hours ago

Sadly, Jon Stewart’s long-gestating animation project with HBO will never see the light of day.

The network announced that it would not proceed with the short-form digital venture that was supposed to comment on topical events. The problem comes from the difficulty of marrying the longer production times of the medium to the quick turnaround needed to stay newsworthy.

Read More: Stephen Colbert’s ‘Daily Show’ Reunion with Jon Stewart, Samantha Bee, John Oliver and More — Watch

“HBO and Jon Stewart have decided not to proceed with a short form digital animated project. We all thought the project had great potential but there were technical issues in terms of production and distribution that proved too difficult given the quick turnaround and topical nature of the material,” HBO and Stewart said in a joint statement on Tuesday. “We’re excited to report that we have some future projects together which »


- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Baywatch’ Critical Roundup

9 hours ago

The reviews are in for “Baywatch,” which opens in theaters this Thursday, May 25. Seth Gordon’s feature film remake of the iconic ’90s series about a group of very hot lifeguards stars Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson as devoted rescuer Mitch Buchannon (the role played by David Hasselhoff in the original series), who has a really hard time with a reckless new recruit named Matt Brody (Zac Efron). Priyanka Chopra co-stars as the villainous vixen, Victoria Leeds, Alexandra Daddario is Summer, Ilfenesh Hadera is Stephanie and Kelly Rohrbach takes on the role of C.J. Parker (originally played by Pamela Anderson).

In her B- review for the film for IndieWire, Judy Dry describes it as “a splashy summer hit full of dick jokes,” adding that “something about the blow-up floaties, the water rescues, and the red suits just screams summer blockbuster. »


- Yoselin Acevedo

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Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look

10 hours ago

If anyone can show us something we haven’t seen before about Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, it’s Oscar-nominated painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel, who announced at Cannes that he will direct “At Eternity’s Gate” starring Willem Dafoe (who also stars in Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project”) as the world’s most acclaimed Post-Impressionist painter, who died at age 37 before he was recognized for his gifts.

“I’ve been working on it for a couple of years,” said Schnabel on the phone from Montauk. “It has to do with trying to make a work of art. By making a film about him, I might shed a little light on what it is to be doing what he’s doing, who he really was, and what his issues were, what somebody needed to do to do what he did, and what he’s not going to do.”

Produced »


- Anne Thompson

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Sony Pictures Classics Picks Up Chloe Zhao’s ‘The Rider’ — Cannes

10 hours ago

Sony Pictures Classics has announced that they have acquired all rights in North America, Latin America, Asia, Australia, New Zealand and Eastern Europe to Chloé Zhao’s “The Rider” at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival.

The film premiered at the Cannes Film Festival Directors’ Fortnight section to stellar reviews on Saturday. It’s the second project from writer-director Chloe Zhao, who previously made the 2015 Sundance drama “Songs My Brother Taught Me.” That film also screened at Directors’ Fortnight.

The Rider” is a drama about a young cowboy who suffers a near fatal head injury and embarks on a search for a new identity.

Read More: Cannes 2017: 9 Hot Acquisition Titles That Will Have Buyers Chasing Foreign Films

Per the film’s official synopsis, “Based on his a true story, ‘The Rider’ stars breakout Brady Jandreau as a once rising star of the rodeo circuit warned that his competition days are over after a tragic riding accident. »


- Kate Erbland

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Cannes: Guillermo del Toro Talks Real-Life Monsters in Political-Leaning Speech

10 hours ago

On Tuesday, Cannes Film Festival celebrated its 70th anniversary with a star-studded event attended by some of the most important personalities in the film industry, including Guillermo del Toro.

During the ceremony, the Mexican filmmaker, who is best known for his beloved fantasy-skewing films such as “Pan’s Labyrinth” and “Hellboy,” spoke about the importance of such films and how sometimes “the monster may be us, not only within us, but existing inside of us.”

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

Del Toro explained that “monsters were born hand in hand with cinema,” adding that from the very beginning of the history of films, movies “incorporated reality and fantasy.”

The director added, “Monsters also show us that it’s possible to breathe and exist in a realm of imperfection, because yes, perfection is impossible and truly unnatural… imperfection, I think, »


- Yoselin Acevedo

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Your TV Budget: How Much Is Too Much To Spend on TV?

10 hours ago

The concept of “too much TV” wasn’t a problem we were ready to complain about… but “Twin Peaks” broke us.

“The Return” didn’t just damage our brains — while trying to understand the uninterpretable mind of David Lynch — but the combination of Dale Cooper, David Duchovny in drag, and damn good coffee means we have to spend an extra $11 a month on streaming services now. And, like many new Showtime Anytime subscribers, that cost is on top of what we were already paying each month to watch the shows we want to watch.

Forget too much TV — how much is too much to spend on TV?

Showtime is now a subscription requirement for telephiles, at least for the next 16 weeks. That means you’ll be nearly spending an extra $50 on TV over four months. So with “Twin Peaks” in mind, we’ve tried to provide a few suggestions to »


- Ben Travers

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‘The President Show’ Has Been Renewed — Right After Its Best Episode Yet

11 hours ago

Everyone knew “The President Show” was going to have to adapt to a rapidly evolving political landscape. For a show that, to some, seemed like a one-joke premise, each new week was going to bring with it a chance to cover yet another angle of the ongoing White House upheaval.

Four episodes in, Comedy Central has given the show a seven-episode renewal, taking the Anthony-Atamanuik-as-Donald-Trump-led talk show through to the end of the summer. And it couldn’t have come at a better time: “The President Show” just aired its best episode yet. (And, in regard to that “one-joke” argument, there are few other shows on TV right now that could get away with hiding a video of a decomposing fox in plain sight during its opening credits.)

Read More: TV’s Newest Late Night Hosts Need to Follow Trevor Noah’s Advice in Order to Survive

Last Thursday’s episode, »


- Steve Greene

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Movies Are Changing, and We’ve Seen Their Future at Cannes 2017 — Analysis

11 hours ago

As the 2017 Cannes Film Festival entered its final days, IndieWire critics Eric Kohn and David Ehrlich took a break from endless screenings and late nights to trade notes on what they’ve gleaned from this year’s edition.

Eric Kohn: I treasure many moviegoing memories from the Cannes Film Festival, but none of them have anything to do with special screenings of “Ocean’s Thirteen” or “Pirates of the Caribbean,” both of which played here over the past decade. Someone must have gotten the memo: There are no traditional big studio movies in the 70th edition of the festival, and what a relief — each day has brought another exciting alternative to bland, unimaginative Hollywood spectacles, although the definition of “Hollywood” may be malleable.

Read More: The 2017 IndieWire Cannes Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During the Festival

After all, what was Bong Joon Ho’s crowdpleasing, allegorical sci-fi »


- Eric Kohn and David Ehrlich

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Donald Trump Shakes Up the Emmy Talk Show Race, As Stephen Colbert, Samantha Bee, and Trevor Noah Get In The Game

11 hours ago

As host of “The Apprentice,” one thing eluded Donald Trump: an Emmy. The fact that the Television Academy never awarded him one drove Trump — whom you might know is now the President of the United States of America — completely bonkers.

Trump wanted an Emmy bad enough that he went on the Hollywood campaign trail in 2008, taking trade newspaper reporters (including, um, this one) to lunch in an attempt to curry attention and grab a win for “The Apprentice.” But that was in the middle of “The Amazing Race’s” hot streak. Ultimately the closest Trump came to Emmy glory was singing the “Green Acres” theme with Megan Mullally on stage at the 2006 ceremony.

It’s a bit ironic, then, that Trump may play a hand in which shows are nominated — and ultimately win — this year’s Emmy for Outstanding Variety Talk Series.

Read More: ‘Daily Show’ Blow: 2016 Variety Talk »


- Michael Schneider

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Michael Haneke’s Pitiless World: As ‘Happy End’ Debuts at Cannes, Reconsider ‘Caché’

12 hours ago

Austrian director Michael Haneke brings his new film, “Happy End,” to the 2017 Cannes Film Festival with a poster of a blue ocean, a French-language clip featuring glum dinner guests, and a wisp of a logline: A European bourgeois family is blind to the wider world around them, including the refugee crisis happening outside their door. But if it’s Haneke, what do we really need to know? This is the filmmaker whose last two films, “Amour” and “The White Ribbon,” won the Palme d’Or. And if this is Haneke, he doesn’t really do happy.

Read More: First Clip from Michael Haneke’s ‘Happy End’ Features a Very Unhappy Dinner Party — Watch

For all of the complexity of Haneke’s films and their refusal to dictate moral clarity, his worldview is consistent and straightforward. In Haneke’s world, society’s crimes and atrocities are not regretful footnotes of history »


- Chris O'Falt

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Netflix: Full List of Movies Arriving in June 2017 Includes ‘Okja’ and ‘The Sixth Sense’

13 hours ago

Netflix has announced the list of films that will be available to stream in June. The list includes new never-before-seen original films, as well as documentaries, comedies, animated titles and some classic movies.

1. “The Sixth Sense” (available June 1)

M. Night Shyamalan’s 1999 classic tells the story of a boy who communicates with spirits and the psychologist who tries to help him. The film stars Bruce Willis and Haley Joel Osment.

2. “Saving Banksy” (available June 2)

The documentary follows a New York-based art collector as he attempts to save the street work of graffiti artist Banksy. The film features interviews with some of the top names in the street art and graffiti world, including Ben Eine, Risk, Revok, Niels “Shoe” Meulman, Blek Le Rat, Anthony Lister, Doze Green, Hera, and Glen E. Friedman.

3. “Shimmer Lake” (available June 9)

The Netflix original drama follows a local sheriff as he attempts to solve the mystery »


- Yoselin Acevedo

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‘Golden Years’ Review: André Téchiné’s Fact-Based Heartbreaker Is a Surprising, Occasionally Sexy Misfire — Cannes

13 hours ago

André Téchiné’s “Golden Years” is a bit of a wash. The true story of a World War I deserter who spent the roaring twenties living as a woman, Téchiné’s film is a surprising misfire, especially because it arrives only one year after the director’s masterful “Being 17.” Both films share thematic – if not exactly narrative – parallels, telling of volatile couplings reordered by sexual exploration. But Téchiné seems to have forgotten the hard-won lessons of his previous film, dialing down any hint of life’s thrilling uncertainty for a stodgily theatrical approach that tells the story in the most superficial way possible.

It is the story of Paul and Louise Grappe, a young couple living their golden years before the Great War breaks and Paul (“Stranger By The Lake” star Pierre Deladonchamps) is sent to the front. The war prove entirely too hellish for him and so he blows off his own finger, »


- Ben Croll

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‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Cast Smolders In Annie Liebovitz Cover Shoot

13 hours ago

Vanity Fair unveiled four stunning cover images today from the set of “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” also known as Episode VIII.

From legendary photographer Annie Liebovitz, the the photos show the cast of the highly anticipated addition to the George Lucas universe gazing out intensely. The collaboration between Liebovitz, Vanity Fair, and “Star Wars” dates back to 1999’s “The Phantom Menace,” and she has photographed every subsequent film since. The full portfolio will be released online on Wednesday, but for now these four sneak peeks will have to do.

Vanity Fair’s first of four #StarWars covers features at least one Jedi—who may or may not be the last https://t.co/kH0AbuNcx0 pic.twitter.com/uwHUDpWXow

— Vanity Fair (@VanityFair) May 23, 2017

The first image show Rey (Daisy Ridley) with Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill), gazing out from the cliffs of the planet Ahch-To, where the “The Force Awakens »


- Jude Dry

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The 50 Best 1990’s Movie Posters

14 hours ago

Art for indies and blockbusters alike were more focused than ever on strong imagery.

Related storiesJon Stewart and HBO Made The Right Call to Kill Their Animated Cable News Parody, and Here's WhyJon Stewart's HBO Animated News Project Has Been Dropped'Baywatch' Critical Roundup: Reviewers Are Not There for Dwayne Johnson's Remake of the Hit '90s Series  »


- William Earl

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‘LoveTrue’: Alma Har’el’s Genre-Bending Documentary Examines a Weirdly Fated Love Story — Watch

14 hours ago

Lauded filmmaker Alma Har’el has again brought her distinctive documentarian’s eye to her latest effort, the genre-bending feature “LoveTrue.” After winning Tribeca’s Best Documentary Feature Award in 2011 for her remarkable and similarly boundary-pushingdebut, “Bombay Beach,” the filmmaker screened work-in-progress selections from “LoveTrue” at Tff 2015. The film is now available — thanks to Netflix — and it’s a spell-binding wonder that compellingly explores some very big questions.

“Love is…never as it seems,” subject Will Hunt a.k.a Coconut Willie, opines in the opening of our exclusive clip, which might as well be the tagline for the entire film. The feature-length doc follows three very different love stories around the country — from Alaska to Hawaii all the way to New York City — to get to the heart of what it really means to love someone.

Read More: Female Filmmakers Want to Direct Blockbusters; Here’s Why They Don »


- Kate Erbland

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The Scariest Scenes in TV History — IndieWire Critics Survey

14 hours ago

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Tuesday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best show currently on TV?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What is the scariest moment or scene on TV?

Ben Travers (@BenTTravers), IndieWire

Though there are moments within “Penny Dreadful” (the seance) and “The X-Files” (“Home”) that left me spooked, the title for scariest TV scene has to go to the only show to give me nightmares — actual, legitimate nightmares. After watching the first two episodes of “Hannibal,” I woke up in the middle of the night, drenched in sweat and haunted by a bright red room with blood running down the walls — twice! Two weeks in a row, “Hannibal” ruined my peaceful slumber, and I had to stop watching the show live (and during the night entirely). Each week, »


- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Jon Benjamin Has a Van’: Remembering the News Parody Show That Helped Launch Some of Best Comedies on TV

14 hours ago

H. Jon Benjamin is one of the most prolific voice actors working in TV today. As the central character on “Archer” and “Bob’s Burgers,” his growly baritone is as recognizable as it is an instant shot of personality for any character he voices. (Plus, how many actors can claim that their involvement in two shows led to a crossover scene that also doubles as a tribute to David Cronenberg’s “A History of Violence”?)

Six years ago, Benjamin added to his string of title characters, this time playing a fictional version of himself on the criminally short-lived Comedy Central show “Jon Benjamin Has a Van.” Part sketch show, part investigative news team parody, it helped give birth to a wave of comedian-led metashows that yielded some of the best comedies of the decade. It took the “Daily Show” correspondent model familiar to many of the network’s viewers and »


- Steve Greene

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With ‘The Beguiled,’ Sofia Coppola Seeks Cannes Redemption with a Southern-Gothic Remake

14 hours ago

With her sixth feature, “The Beguiled,” Sofia Coppola returns to Cannes in the main Competition. It’s her first time since 2006, when the reception for royal costume drama “Marie Antoinette” evolved from a  scattering of boos to became a reported misfire. That’s the power of the Cannes echo chamber. Her visually sumptuous and witty $40 million studio movie earned a standing ovation at the public screening and a range of reviews, but only made $60.8 million worldwide — not nearly enough to make it profitable.

Coppola had better Cannes luck with her smaller-scaled first feature, the dreamy literary adaptation “The Virgin Suicides” ($10.6 million worldwide). It starred Kirsten Dunst and broke out of Director’s Fortnight with critics’ raves. Her Tokyo-set Bill Murray-Scarlett Johansson two-hander “Lost in Translation” ($117 million worldwide) debuted in Venice on its way to Coppola’s Original Screenplay Oscar.

Back on the indie side were Chateau Marmont Hollywood-slice »


- Anne Thompson

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