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‘Bloodline’ Recap Video: Relive Every Essential Moment of the First 2 Seasons

39 minutes ago

The Rayburns have been very, very busy.

On Netflix’s family drama “Bloodline,” the Rayburn family may have seemed like the most upstanding, hard-working family in the Florida Keys community, but one dark secret has laid waste to their interpersonal interactions in a way that had far-reaching consequences.

Read More: ‘Bloodline’ Season 3 Trailer: Kyle Chandler Comes Home as Netflix Sets an Early Release Date for Final Season — Watch

When the series first started, patriarch Robert (Sam Shepard) and matriarch Sally (Sissy Spacek) are celebrating the 45th anniversary of their seaside hotel, The Rayburn Hotel. All of their kids are gathered for the occasion: detective John (Kyle Chandler), marina owner Kevin (Norbert Leo Butz) and attorney Meg (Linda Cardellini). Unbeknownst to the family, they’ll be joined by one more Rayburn: the eldest son Danny (Ben Mendelsohn), the black sheep of the family.

As the show unfolded, each of the Rayburns »


- Hanh Nguyen

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Here’s Why ‘Unforgettable’ Director Denise Di Novi Will Be the Woman Who Gets Another Shot

1 hour ago

This weekend, veteran producer Denise Di Novi saw her directorial debut, Warner Bros.’ “Unforgettable,” make an underwhelming box-office debut with an estimated $4.8 million for the weekend. For most women, that would be the kiss of death: Very few women get the chance to direct studio films, and underperformance means there won’t be an encore. That won’t be the case for Di Novi.

Read More: ‘Unforgettable’ Review: Katherine Heigl and Rosario Dawson Are in Two Very Different Movies, But It Almost WorksDi Novi is like very few women in Hollywood. She’s an unapologetic product of the studios: After 20 years, she still has a rare overall deal at Warner Bros, where she was Tim Burton’s longtime producer (“Edward Scissorhands,” “Ed Wood,” “Nightmare Before Christmas,” his “Batman” films) as well as the shepherd to romantic hits like “Nights of Rodanthe” and Nicholas Sparks’ “A Night to Remember.” And, every »


- Anne Thompson

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Michael Mann to Adapt ‘Black Hack Down’ Author’s ‘Hue 1968’ as a Miniseries

1 hour ago

Prepare for a Manniseries. Deadline reports that Michael Mann and Michael De Luca have purchased the rights to Mark Bowden’s forthcoming “Hue 1968: The Turning Point in the American War in Vietnam,” which they intend to adapt as an eight-to-10-hour miniseries.

Read More: Hugh Jackman and Noomi Rapace to Star in Michael Mann’s Ferrari Biopic

Mann has called “Hue 1968” “a masterpiece of intensely dramatic non-fiction” whose achievement “is in making ‘them’ into us.” Bowden is also the author of “Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War,” whose 2001 film adaptation was directed by Ridley Scott.

“We are them. There are no background people; people abstracted into statistics, body counts,” said Mann. “There is the sense that everybody is somebody, as each is in the reality of his or her own life. The brilliance of Bowden’s narrative, the achievement of interviewing hundreds of people on all »


- Michael Nordine

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‘The Persian Connection’ Trailer: Neo-Noir Fever Dream Exposes the Underbelly of Los Angeles Organized Crime — Watch

1 hour ago

After premiering at last year’s Tribeca Film Festival, “The Persian Connection” is finally headed to a theater near you. The debut feature of director Daniel Y-Li Grove, the film is a neon-noir film set in the Persian underbelly of L.A.

Read More: Film Acquisition Rundown: The Orchard Picks Up ‘Thelma,’ Samuel Goldwyn Films Buys ‘Gook’ and More

The Persian Connection” follows Behrouz, a former child soldier who, after surviving the Iran-Iraq War, was smuggled away to the streets of Los Angeles to be monitored by the Iranian mobster Cirrus Golshiri. Wanting to escape from the life of organized crime and under the table dealings, Behrouz dreams of becoming the “American Real Estate Man.”

Twenty years later, a high stakes poker game brings Behrouz and Cirrus face to face. Accused of stealing from his boss, events from Behrouz’s past and present begin to collide and he and his girlfriend, »


- Kerry Levielle

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How a 20-Year-Old Filmmaker Wrote, Directed and Starred In Her Feature Directorial Debut — Tribeca 2017

1 hour ago

Filmmaker Quinn Shephard didn’t go to film school — instead, she made her own. The New Jersey native was just 15 when she came up with the idea for what would become her feature directorial debut “Blame,” a modern high school-set take on Arthur Miller’s classic play “The Crucible.” Seven years later, Shephard is at the Tribeca Film Festival with the film, one that she not only stars in, but also wrote, directed, edited and produced. At 21, she’s reached a benchmark that usually filmmakers a few more years of work.

The film follows Shephard as high school outcast Abigail Grey, who returns to high school after a mysterious incident the year before, only to form a taboo bond with her new drama teacher (Chris Messina). As their relationship blossoms in very unexpected ways, Abigail’s nemesis Melissa (Nadia Alexander) observes from afar, continually threatening to bust the entire situation wide open (a witch hunt? »


- Kate Erbland

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7 Netflix Original Movies That Are Worth Seeking Out

1 hour ago

Last week, in response to the news that Netflix had finally cracked the Cannes competition lineup (a breakthrough that inspired the Federation of French Cinemas to question if a movie that skips theaters should even be considered “a cinematographic work”), I wrote about the streaming giant and how they’ve performed as a distributor. My conclusions were, uh, not super favorable. Criticizing the company’s penchant for pricing out the competition, hoarding the hottest indies on the festival circuit, and burying them on their site without the benefit of a proper release, I argued that Netflix isn’t a distributor so much as “a graveyard with unlimited viewing hours,” and that “it doesn’t release movies, it inters them.” It’s a problem that extends to the well-funded features that Netflix produces themselves, a problem that’s only going to get worse as those titles continue to get better.

See MoreNetflix Keeps Buying Great Movies, »


- David Ehrlich

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‘The Exception’ Trailer: Jai Courtney Is a German Soldier Conflicted By Love in World War II Thriller — Watch

2 hours ago

“War changes everything,” Lily James whispers in the opening moments of David Leveaux’s feature film debut, “The Exception,” a sentiment that seems to carry right through the World War II-set thriller.

Based on Alan Judd’s 2003 novel “The Kaiser’s Last Kiss,” the film follows Jai Courtney as Wehrmacht officer Stefan Brandt, tasked with guarding Kaiser Wilhelm II (Christopher Plummer), the last German Emperor and King of Prussia, who fled Germany and abdicated the throne decades before war broke out.

Read More: ‘Five Came Back’: How the Story of Hollywood Directors In World War II Became a Great Netflix Series

Despite his perilous place in the changing German government, the exiled Kaiser was important to the Nazis, and when word gets out that his home may be infiltrated by a British spy, the Nazis make it a priority to protect him. While guarding the ousted leader, Stefan falls for James’ Mieke, »


- Kate Erbland

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Memes Are Helping People Learn to Love the ‘Star Wars’ Prequels

2 hours ago

Well, whaddya know: The internet doesn’t hate the “Star Wars” prequels as much as it used to. At the forefront of this apparent reappraisal is, of course, a never-ending barrage of memes emanating from the r/PrequelMemes subreddit, whose numbers have grown more in the last few months than Jango Fett’s did in the lead-up to the Clone Wars.

In addition to being frequently hilarious, this phenomenon raises a question: Are people joining in on the fun because they already love Episodes I–III, or are the memes actually inspiring them to go a little easier on the once-loathed prequels?

The answer is probably a mixture of both, but allow me to make a case for the latter effect. Shortly before “The Force Awakens” came out, I did what I imagine many others did: watched all six existing “Star Wars” movies in order. I hadn’t seen any of them in years, »


- Michael Nordine

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‘Justice League’ Trailer: The All-Star Superhero Team Comes Together to Fight a New Nemesis — Watch

2 hours ago

Zack Snyder’s long-promised “Justice League” feature film is mere months from release, so it’s time the film’s marketing to ratchet into high gear. Enter a brand new trailer, which utilizes a modernized take (???) on The Beatles classic “Come Together” to do just that, uniting the erstwhile superhero team — including Batman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Cyborg and The Flash — to battle a brand new big bad.

The trailer seems bent on playing up the whole “hey, let’s put a team together” aspect of the new franchise entry, and while it’s not high on the action, it leans into some more humorous elements of bringing together such a disparate group of super-powered outcasts. Ben Affleck’s Bruce Wayne jokes that his power is being rich (fair), while Ezra Miller as The Flash and Jason Momoa as Aquaman add some very necessary lightness to a typically dark series. (If »


- Kate Erbland

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‘The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson’ Review: A Stonewall Hero Is Mourned In Fascinating Detective Story — Tribeca 2017 Review

3 hours ago

David France’s Oscar-nominated “How to Survive a Plague” was a mesmerizing look at AIDS activism in the eighties and nineties, reconstructed with bountiful archival footage; France’s followup, “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson,” is a kind of thematic sequel, this time focusing on trans activism during the same time period. Both movies grapple with the reverberations of these dramatic efforts in the present moment, but “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson” is particularly suspenseful for the way it recollects the past through the prism of a murder mystery, brilliantly fusing an archival history with the elements of a detective story.

Whereas “Plague” explored the efforts of Act Up and other institutions to combat the AIDS epidemic, “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson” focuses on Greenwich Village “street queen” Johnson, a Stonewall riots hero who died under mysterious circumstances in 1992 when she was »


- Eric Kohn

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‘Last Week Tonight’: John Oliver Takes Aim at Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner in Brutal New Segment — Watch

3 hours ago

“Last Week Tonight” host John Oliver has a message for the subset of Americans who continue to hold out hope that Donald Trump’s administration is somehow being positively influenced by the work and interests of his daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband Jared Kushner: Uh, maybe don’t.

On last night’s episode of the HBO political chat show, Oliver dedicated his long-form deep-dive segment to exploring Ivanka and Jared’s credentials — beyond just the obvious nepotism — as a way to examine the true possibilities of their positions in the White House. In short, it’s not exactly heartening.

Read More: ‘Last Week Tonight’: John Oliver Visits a Very French Bistro to Explain Terrifying Elections — Watch

From Ivanka’s strange double-talk when it comes to her ability to influence her father (basically, she says she does it all the time, but will never tell the world exactly how or why, »


- Kate Erbland

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‘Alien: Covenant’ Births New Virtual Reality Experience With ‘In Utero’ for Oculus — Watch

3 hours ago

Alien: Covenant” distributor 20th Century Fox is going all in on the fear factor of Ridley Scott’s latest journey to strange alien lands and even worse human-made decisions. The latest film in the ever-expanding “Alien” franchise has promised to load up on the visceral nightmares, and a new virtual reality experience from Oculus looks to feed directly into those exact terrors.

The new “experience,” billed “Alien: Covenant In Utero,” will arrive on the Vr platform on April 26 and promises “a 360-degree virtual reality journey into a living nightmare and offers a terrifyingly close and personal encounter as an alien neomorph…” Fun!

Read More: ‘Alien: Covenant’ First Footage: Fox Debuts Terrifying, Visceral New Look at Ridley Scott’s Sequel

You can get a (very short) peek at the project with a new teaser for the experience, which in just a few seconds manages to be totally consuming and genuinely scary. »


- Kate Erbland

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‘The Trip to Spain’ Review: Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon and Michael Caine Return for Year’s Funniest Film – Tribeca 2017

4 hours ago

Firmly cementing its series’ status as the “Before” movies of male friendship, “The Trip to Spain” may seem like nothing more than a third taste of a favorite dish, but the best meals in life are worth eating thrice, and this one has been simmered in some tangy new spices and aged to perfection.

Once again, British comedians Rob Brydon and Steve Coogan eat their way through a week-long drive through some repugnantly gorgeous European countryside. Once again, their playful (but gently existential) rivalry is expressed through dueling impressions of the more famous men who came before them; despite an obligatory appearance from Michael Caine(s), this installment belongs to Mick Jagger and Roger Moore. And once again, a bouquet of melancholy notes results in a bittersweet aftertaste that lingers on the tongue, as our two heroes — recast as Don Quixote and Sancho Panza tilting at wind turbines — struggle to »


- David Ehrlich

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‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ Post-Credits Scenes: What They Are and What They Mean For the McU

7 hours ago

The Marvel Cinematic Universe didn’t invent the post-credits scene, but the super-powered superhero franchise has taken the concept to wild new ends, using them — and there always seem to be plenty of them — to hint at storylines to come, introduce new characters and have a little fun while doing it.

James Gunn’s “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” goes all in on post-credits scenes, and boasts not just one, not even three, but five extra scenes that add both fun and a generous dose of groundwork-laying to the expanding franchise.  Here’s what you can expect to see after the credits roll (and some hints as to what it could mean for the series).

(Spoilers ahead for “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2.”)

1. Kraglin Gets a New Toy

During the latter half of the film, both Michael Rooker’s Yondu and Sean Gunn’s Kraglin play bigger roles »


- Kate Erbland

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‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ Review: A Fun Space Opera That You’ve Seen Before

11 hours ago

If you’ve seen “Guardians of the Galaxy,” you already know a lot about “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” — a lively comedic space opera filled with banter between humans and imaginative aliens, astonishing visual effects, and the most idiosyncratic set of characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. (As a bonus, no distracting Iron Man cameos.) However, if you’ve seen “Guardians of the Galaxy,” you’ve also encountered a better version of this experience.

Still, Gunn doesn’t fall short of the potential; he excels at turning cheesy, technologically overwrought material into next-level spectacle. There’s so much to enjoy about the “Guardians” that one can easily relax into its formula. It’s often a thrill to simply roll with the lively classic rock soundtrack, smarmy banter, slapstick battle scenes, and a wooden alien named Groot, now more adorable than ever.

See More‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 »


- Eric Kohn

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‘Feud: Bette And Joan’: Ryan Murphy Reveals Why Hiring Women to Write and Direct Mattered So Much

14 hours ago

[Editor’s note: The following contains spoilers for “Feud” Episode 8, “You Mean All This Time We Could Have Been Friends?”]

Ryan Murphy knows what you thought “Feud: Bette and Joan” was going to be. And he believes that the show worked because, ultimately, it wasn’t.

“I think people were maybe thinking it was gonna be just a campy, bitchy exploration of these two women,” he told IndieWire from the set of “Versace: American Crime Story,” which has just begun filming. “But I was never interested in that. I was really interested in the sadness and the regret and the pain and also the reward, and just to show how hard they worked. Not only at their careers but on their facades.”

Read More: ‘Feud: Bette and Joan’: Alison Wright On How Her Fictional Character May Fare Better Than Real Women in Film

Facades make up a major part of the FX drama, which chronicled the long-time rivalry between Bette Davis (played by Susan Sarandon) and Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Veep’ Review: A Big List of the Ways Women in Politics Get F***ed, and Not in a Good Way

15 hours ago

Immediate Reaction:

Oh, Amy. After warning Selina against Andrew’s toxic charms, Buddy Calhoun’s campaign manager and girlfriend became the “Lobotomy Barbie” she cautioned her old boss about, standing by her man as he apologized for making an ass of himself — and a joke of their sex life in the process. Both women got screwed by their chosen men, and not in a way they enjoy.

But the fuck-over-y (ovary?) didn’t end there. Selina was spurned by her fellow ex-presidents (all male) at the opening of President Hughes’ library. She, in turn, dismissed the idea of a female architect, telling Gary, “We’re not redoing a kitchen here,” while Marjorie and Catherine lamented the fact they need a man to have a baby. And of course, Selina ended up getting doubly boned by Andrew, first upon learning of his betrayal and then by the woman he cheated with, »


- Ben Travers

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‘Silicon Valley’: Thomas Middleditch Breaks Down Richard’s Big Gamble in the Season 4 Premiere

15 hours ago

[Editor’s Note: The following interview contains spoilers for the “Silicon Valley” Season 4 premiere, Episode 1, “Success Failure.”]

Silicon Valley” saw big changes in its first episode of Season 4. What started with the Pied Piper team plotting to oust Richard as CEO ended with the tech genius (played by Thomas Middleditch) stepping down voluntarily in order to pursue his true passion: a new internet.

Given how long it took for the team to find a useful application for Richard’s original algorithm — first discovered in the Season 1 premiere — one has to wonder: Is Richard self-sabotaging?

“Oh, yeah. He totally is,” Middleditch said in a recent interview with IndieWire. “[In Season 3] Jack Barker was going to make Richard Chief Technical Officer. And if Richard knew what was good for him, he would’ve done that.”

Read More: Zach Woods Compares His ‘Silicon Valley’ Character to a ‘New England Mom,’ and Here’s Why That’s Hysterically Tragic

Middleditch, who earned an Emmy nomination in 2016 for his portrayal of the Pied Piper founder, »


- Ben Travers

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‘The Leftovers’: How The Producers Enlisted a ‘Perfect Stranger’ For Season 3’s Most Important Scene

16 hours ago

[Editor’s note: This piece contains spoilers for “The Leftovers” Season 3, Episode 2, “Don’t Be Ridiculous.”]

Mark Linn-Baker started watching “The Leftovers” because he was in it — though he didn’t know why.

Before the first season of the HBO drama began airing, the veteran actor got a call from his agents informing him that the show wanted to use clips from “Perfect Strangers,” the classic 1980s sitcom he starred in from 1986-1993. However, they didn’t provide any context.

“So that first season, I was watching, because I was curious what this show was,” Linn-Baker told IndieWire via phone. And his attention was definitely rewarded by the supernatural drama, which wonders what would happen to the world if two percent of the population just suddenly vanished.

“It was a fascinating show,” Linn-Baker said. “Extremely well-produced, extremely upsetting — in a good way! Very engaging, and extremely imaginative.”

One of the first season’s most imaginative conceits: That the entire cast of “Perfect Strangers” was included in the Great Departure. »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘The Leftovers’ Review: Episode 2 Redefines the Series as Carrie Coon Delivers an Astounding Solo Show — And Takes Control

16 hours ago

[Editor’s note: The following review contains spoilers for the “The Leftovers” Season 3, Episode 2, “Don’t Be Ridiculous.”]

Immediate Reaction:

Another episode of “The Leftovers,” another mind-blowing last-second twist. After an episode spent entirely with Nora Durst (Carrie Coon), we took a trip to the Outback in the final minutes and watched a police officer named Kevin get drugged, tied up, and drowned by a group of women on horseback who are somehow connected to Kevin Sr. (Scott Glenn).

Now, it appears as clear as anything in “The Leftovers” can be that this was a case of mistaken identity: The women, led by the tremendously talented Lindsay Duncan, thought Australian Kevin was American Kevin (Justin Theroux). They believed he would rise from the dead, as Kevin has, but why they wanted him to briefly die and how they found out about him in the first place remain mysteries. Does Kevin Sr. know them? Did he have a copy of Matt’s book? Is this even the present day, »


- Ben Travers

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