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‘Goodbye Christopher Robin’ Review: This Biopic About Winnie the Pooh’s Creator Is Totally Run of the Milne

1 hour ago

Once upon a time we used to tell stories; now we just tell stories about how we used to tell stories. At least, that’s how it feels to watch a consistently milquetoast, comfortably middlebrow bit of true-life fluff like “Goodbye Christopher Robin,” which does for Winnie the Pooh what “Finding Neverland” did for Peter Pan (which is to say that it takes a formative and utterly unique work of literature and reverse engineers it into a passable biopic that has no hope of changing the world or anyone in it).

It’s a shame, because A.A. Milne’s personal and professional lives are both fertile dramatic territory, and the film’s script — by Frank Cottrell Boyce and Simon Vaughan — makes sure to point out all of the interesting movies that could have been mined from this material as they pass by and fade out of sight. Instead, we’re »


- David Ehrlich

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‘Will & Grace’ Review: A Revival with Gusto, Laughs, and Purpose, the NBC Sitcom is Sharp as Ever

1 hour ago

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains light spoilers for “Will & Grace” Season 9 (2017), regarding the characters’ current living arrangements and how the new season deals with the former series finale.]

The opening scene of “Will & Grace” Season 9 — or Season 1 of the revival, or whatever NBC is intent on calling it — should strike fear in the hearts of any TV fan. As the core four bluntly brings viewers up to date on who’s single (everyone but Karen), who’s living together (Will and Grace), and who’s nonexistent (those kids from the series Season 8 finale), there’s a moment where Jack turns to the camera and speaks directly to the audience: “Got it?” he asks.

The triggered anxiety shouldn’t stem from the blunt exposition or an uncharacteristic fourth-wall break; it stems from how Jack’s rhetorical question to the audience at home is reminiscent of another ’90s sitcom revival which did the same thing: “Fuller House,” the worst of television’s zombie horde, featured a scene in Season 1 where the entire cast turned and stared blankly at the camera. »


- Ben Travers

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‘The Mayor’ Review: ‘Hamilton’ Alum’s Trump-Adjacent Political Sitcom Gets Off to an Inspiring Start

1 hour ago

Veep” is the best comedy on television, as attested by the 2017 Emmys and confirmed by IndieWire’s substantial critical authority, and its quickly approaching series finale will mark a great loss to television. The way in which David Mandel and Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ sword-swinging satirical attack on our corrupt national leaders stabs and skewers every last power-hungry politician is a service of the utmost importance when anger is running high.

But in addition to a series that satisfies American bloodlust for the blowhards on Capital Hill, those same viewers need to believe in politicians. We need a show to encourage that belief, and the current climate — which can be described as tumultuous at best — only emphasizes said point.

Enter ABC’s “The Mayor,” a comedy built around inspiring characters who not only serve as the inverse to HBO’s emotionally deadened D.C. politicos, but who remind us there is still good in this world, »


- Ben Travers

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‘The Big Sick’ Sweepstakes: Enter to Win the Indie Rom-Com Hit on Blu-ray

1 hour ago

One of the surprise hits of this year’s Sundance Film Festival was the Judd Apatow-produced romantic comedy “The Big Sick.” The film details the real-life relationship between “Silicon Valley” star Kumail Nanjani and his wife, Emily V. Gordon, and how the couple’s relationship overcame cultural differences and a life-threatening illness. The film has been a box office success since it’s release over the summer, and remains atop the highest grossing indie films of 2017.

Read More:‘The Big SickReview: Kumail Nanjiani’s Real-Life Story Is a Major Crowdpleaser — Sundance 2017

The Big Sick” stars Nanjani, who plays himself, and Zoe Kazan, who plays his wife, as well as Holly Hunter and Ray Romano. To celebrate the Blu-Ray release of “The Big Sick,” we’ve giving away five Blu-Ray copies of the film to five lucky winners based in the United States.

Now through Friday, »


- Jamie Righetti

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William Friedkin Challenges Darren Aronofsky to a ‘mother!’-Inspired Bible Debate — Listen

2 hours ago

“Do you believe in God?” William Friedkin recently asked this question to Darren Aronofsky after a screening of “mother!” at the Director’s Guild of America in Los Angeles. “The Exorcist” filmmaker was struggling to understand what exactly Aronofsky was trying to say about God and the Bible in his polarizing new movie, and let’s just say Aronofsky’s views don’t exactly line up with Friedkin’s.

The two directors have known each other for quite some time, but “mother!” has brought a little friendly contention into their relationship over their opposing religious beliefs. The DGA recorded their conversation for its Director’s Cut podcast, and it’s absolutely fascinating to listen to them debate about their viewpoints.

Read More:‘mother!’: Darren Aronofsky Reacts to ‘F’ CinemaScore, Says ‘Some People Are Not Going to Want to Listen’

“I personally do not believe [that] once their was a void, »


- Zack Sharf

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Samira Wiley Returns to Comedy in the Trailer for ‘Ryan Hansen Solves Crimes on Television’ (Exclusive) — Watch

2 hours ago

It’s been a breakthrough year for Samira Wiley; the explosive talent who first made a splash on “Orange Is the New Black” picked up an Emmy nomination for her sharp performance as Moira in Reed Morano’s “The Handmaid’s Tale.” This fall, Wiley returns to her comedic roots with a Hollywood-set buddy comedy from the director of “Dodgeball,” “Ryan Hansen Solves Crimes on Television.” The Hollywood satire makes fun of its semi-unknown titular star while boasting guest appearances from Kristen Bell, Joe McHale, and Jon Cryer. The eight-episode, half-hour comedy released its first official trailer today, and it’s full of snappy jabs and famous people making fun of themselves.

The series stars Hansen (“Veronica Mars”) as himself, a member of an Lapd task force which partners actors with homicide detectives so they can use their “actor skills” to help solve murders. Wiley plays as his no-nonsense partner, »


- Jude Dry

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‘Will & Grace,’ ‘Young Sheldon’ Predicted To Be TV’s Biggest New Hits, According To Fall Awareness Study

2 hours ago

Critics may grumble about too many reboots and brand extensions in TV, but the numbers don’t lie: It’s still the quickest way to grab the attention of fickle audiences. And the latest Fall TV tracking report from research firm Ipsos Connect bears that out.

IndieWire has obtained a copy of Ipsos’ latest TV Dailies report, organized by lead product manager Thomas Kelley, and the news is especially good for CBS and NBC. (The official start to the 2017-2018 TV season is this coming Monday, Sept. 25, per Nielsen.)

According to the study, which polled around 6,000 TV viewers age 18-49 over the past three weeks, NBC’s return of “Will & Grace” has the highest awareness of any new show premiering over the next few weeks: 66.5 percent of respondents knew the show would air on NBC this fall, nearly double the stat for any other show.

That’s a bit of a cheat, »


- Michael Schneider

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‘The Orville’ Episode 3: Why Its Poor Understanding of Gender Makes ‘About a Girl’ The Worst Episode Yet

11 hours ago

[Editor’s note: Spoilers for “The Orville” Season 1, Episode 3, “About a Girl,” below.]

The Orville,” now having been on the air for two weeks now, has become a ratings success for Fox, despite negative reviews. There are always a variety of explanations for that sort of discord between the viewing audience and professional critics, but in the case of Seth MacFarlane’s “homage” to the “Star Trek” franchise, the answer might be relatively simple: Critics were able to see three episodes, not just one.

And of the first three episodes, “About a Girl” was by far the most troubling screened by critics, because it exposed just how out of his depth MacFarlane was in trying to find his own take on “Star Trek.”

Theoretically, “The Orville” wouldn’t have been complete without the “Family Guy” creator following in Gene Roddenberry’s footsteps and attempting to tackle Important Issues of the Day in the context of science fiction. For decades, “Trek” has used allegory »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Watchmen’: Why The Length of the HBO Series Will Affect the Story

16 hours ago

[Editor’s note: Mild spoilers for the graphic novel “Watchmen,” written by Alan Moore and drawn by Dave Gibbons, below.]

It begins: The build-up to what could be HBO’s next landmark television event. In a photo posted to Instagram, “The Leftovers” showrunner Damon Lindelof announced that it was “Day One” — which HBO later confirmed meant that the writers’ room for his next project, an adaptation of the 1986 graphic novel “Watchmen,” was open:

According to an official statement from HBO, “HBO has committed to the pilot and back up scripts,” but details beyond that haven’t been made available.

However, Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ iconic graphic novel, well known to comic book fans and connoisseurs of great storytelling alike, has enough of a legacy to inspire questions. The biggest question, of course: Will “Watchmen” be a limited series or an ongoing drama?

It’s become an increasingly complicated question of late, as it now seems possible that every TV show, no matter how theoretically close-ended, could potentially be rebooted or continued. »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘The Vietnam War’: Ken Burns Reveals Why John McCain Wasn’t Interviewed for the Pow Section of the Documentary

16 hours ago

As “The Vietnam War” reaches its halfway point Thursday night with Episode 5, “This Is What We Do,” viewers will recognize a familiar face: John McCain. The Arizona senator is one of the most high-profile POWs during the Vietnam War, and his ordeal was brought back into the spotlight during the 2016 presidential campaign when Donald Trump said, “He is a war hero because he was captured. I like people who weren’t captured.”

The PBS documentary will reveal just a fraction of the ordeal that McCain went through after he was shot down during a bombing mission over Hanoi in October 1967. As the son of Admiral McCain, John McCain was an important prisoner and therefore was also interviewed for television at that time. He underwent various beatings and tortures that have left him with lifelong health issues and disabilities.

Read More:‘The Vietnam War’ Review: Ken Burns’ Exhaustive Conflict Biography Shows »


- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Riverdale’ Star Kj Apa Involved in Car Crash; Show to Continue Production Uninterrupted

16 hours ago

The show must go on. “Riverdale” will continue production following star Kj Apa’s early-morning car crash, reports Deadline, and Warner Bros. Television has released a statement expressing how “extremely grateful” the studio is that the 20-year-old actor was unhurt. Apa, who plays Archie Andrews on the show, crashed into a lamp post while driving home and was tended to be medical personnel.

Read More:‘Sabrina the Teenage Witch’ Gets a Dark Coming-of-Age Horror Series From the Creators of ‘Riverdale

Here’s Wbtv’s full statement:

“First and foremost, we are extremely grateful that Kj Apa was uninjured during his recent accident. Secondarily, we want to specifically address the characterization that conditions on the set of ‘Riverdale’ are of concern. We have a large cast of series regulars, and our actors do not work every day. On the day of the accident, Kj worked 14.2 hours. The previous day he worked 2.5 hours, »


- Michael Nordine

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Jean Rouch, Whose Films Inspired Godard, Receives Eight-Film DVD Box Set From Icarus — Watch

18 hours ago

Jean Rouch may not be a household name, but some of the world’s most revered filmmakers — from Jean-Luc Godard to Werner Herzog — are indebted to him. The French filmmaker pioneered the concept of “ethno-fiction,” fictional films built around the lives of everyday people, and developed the bulk of his filmography out of time spent in Africa. His 1958 feature “Moi, un Noir” follows the daily routine of a trio of Nigerian immigrants off the Ivory Coast who imagine themselves as movie stars, and its blend of jump cuts and amateur performances reportedly inspired Godard’s 1960 debut “Breathless.” Rouch’s documentary “Chronicle of a Summer,” co-directed with Edgar Morin, is considered a foundational achievement of the cinéma vérité movement.

Nevertheless, Rouch has remained a cinephile secret for decades, and in the wake of his death in 2004, much of his work has been unavailable in the U.S. — until now.

On November »


- Indiewire Staff

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Mexico’s Permanencia Voluntaria Film Archive Damaged in Earthquake: ‘These Antique Film Reels Are Irreplaceable’

19 hours ago

The earthquake that struck Mexico on Tuesday affected every aspect of life in Mexico City and the surrounding area. That includes the Permanencia Voluntaria Film Archive, whose director has shared a letter detailing the damage done to one of Mexico’s most important cinematic institutions; in addition to movies, Permanencia Voluntaria houses posters, documents, and promotional materials that can’t be found anywhere else.

Read More:‘Narcos’ Location Scout Carlos Muñoz Portal Found Shot and Killed in Mexico

“We are a small town, our buildings are heavily damaged, and we lack the money, means, and manpower to repair the extensive damage wrought by the earthquake,” writes Viviana Garcia Besne, noting that local authorities have barred the archive’s employees from accessing the second floor and surveying the full extent of the damage. Baticine, the community movie theater managed by the archive, has also been destroyed.

Read More:Gael Garcia Bernal »


- Michael Nordine

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The 25 Sexiest TV Scenes on Premium Cable of the Last 25 Years

19 hours ago

In the days before premium cable, television was a squeaky-clean place for the most part. The traditional networks rarely dared to push boundaries when it came to graphic sexual content for fear of pissing off advertisers. (And when they did, as with ABC’s “NYPD Blue,” affiliates and advertisers did indeed balk on cue.)

But then came HBO, Showtime, Cinemax, Starz, and a slew of other networks, which asked for a little extra subscriber cash, but offered in exchange unfiltered violence, language, and sex. Without that creative freedom, it’s doubtful that television as a storytelling art form would have evolved in the same way, especially when it comes to sex — one of the most primal aspects of humanity that the broadcast networks kept behind closed doors for far too long.

Because different things are sexy to different people, this list is unranked — streaming platforms and ad-supported cable networks will be saved for future lists. »


- Ben Travers, Hanh Nguyen, Steve Greene, Liz Shannon Miller and Michael Schneider

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‘Loveless’: Russia Chooses an Oscar Entry That Criticizes Its Society

20 hours ago

The question of how Russia’s Oscar committee would vote on its submission has been answered. Andrey Zvyaginstev’s Cannes jury prize-winner “Loveless” (Sony Pictures Classics) is the official entry. And it’s a movie that couldn’t be more critical of Russian society, which is portrayed as consumed by careerism, selfishness, greed, and even profound neglect of its own children. The movie was financed independent of the Russian film industry and government funding.

After the Academy overlooked Zvyagintsev’s film “Elena” in 2011 in favor of Oscar perennial and Russian film leader Nikita Mikalkhov’s “Burnt By the Sun 2,” Russia’s top auteur helped foment a revolution inside the Oscar committee. It underwent an overhaul following a press outcry about clandestine behind-the-scenes manipulations and a lack of transparency. Since then the committee has doubled in size, to about 25 filmmakers.

Read More:Cannes Review: In ‘Loveless,’ Russia Is the Place Where Families »


- Anne Thompson

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‘Rick and Morty’ Co-Creator Dan Harmon Denounces Fans Who Harassed Female Writers’: ‘I Loathe These People’

20 hours ago

Rick and Morty” now has gender parity in its writing room, which has unsurprisingly come as unwelcome news to a certain segment of the animated comedy’s audience. Jane Becker and Jessica Gao were reminded of this the hard — and all-too-common — way when they found themselves not only harassed but the victims of doxxers who leaked the two writers’ personal information online.

Rick and Morty” co-creator Dan Harmon spoke to Entertainment Weekly about the incident, calling it “disgusting” and thoroughly denouncing anyone and everyone involved: “It’s offensive to me as someone who was born male and white, and still works way harder than them, that there’s some white male [fan out there] trying to further some creepy agenda by ‘protecting’ my work.”

Read More:‘Rick and Morty’: 10 Reasons Why ‘Morty’s Mind Blowers’ is a Great Place to Start for New Viewers

“I was familiar going into the third season, »


- Michael Nordine

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A New Animation Festival Launches, With Plans To Impact the Oscar Race

20 hours ago

Aiming to make an impact this Oscar season, the inaugural Animation Is Film Festival from GKids, the Annecy International Animation Festival, Variety, and Acifa-Hollywood launches October 20-22 at the Tcl Chinese 6 Theater.

The festival will present a selection of new animated feature films from Asia, Europe, South America, and North America, with juried and audience prizes and filmmakers attending most screenings. Additionally, the festival will feature studio events, special screenings, short film programs, and a Vr lounge.

Aif seems well timed: The Academy now allows all members to vote for animated features, using preferential voting. However, it remains to be seen what the dynamic will be in terms of mainstream versus indie nominees.

GKids, which has nine Oscar nominations (including this year’s “My Life as a Zucchini”), has seven movies in contention this season; four showcase in competition at Aif. The highlight is “The Breadwinner” (October 20), a coproduction of Ireland, »


- Bill Desowitz

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‘Twin Peaks’: 10 Behind-the-Scenes Photos to Help You Cope With the Series’ End

20 hours ago

For anyone who has been having troubling processing the fact that “Twin Peaks: The Return” is over, which could very well mean the end of the franchise as we know it, let the cast’s wonderful behind-the-scenes photos shine a light upon you. Kyle McLachlan, Sabrina Sutherland, and more have taken to social media in the weeks after that mind-blowing finale to share never-before-seen looks at “The Return” set, and man does David Lynch seem to be having the time of his life.

Read More:David Lynch Finally Shares His Thoughts on the ‘Twin Peaks’ Finale, Confirms Season 4 is Possible

Lynch has teased the possibility of continuing the series with Season 4, though nothing is confirmed. He joked that time is the biggest factor standing in his way, given it took over four years to write, direct, and edit “The Return.” The filmmaker is remaining ambiguous about the finale, telling »


- Zack Sharf

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‘Kingsman’ Director Matthew Vaughn Explains Why So Many Action Scenes Are Boring

21 hours ago

In an age where Hollywood is making fewer movies, they are also making bigger ones, with more explosive special effects. In the midst of what can feel like a CGI arms race, IndieWire has argued that big budget action scenes have become boring. “Kingsman 2: The Golden Circle” writer-director Matthew Vaughn agrees.

“I look at some action sequences and it’ll be like watching a football game and everything is on a mid-shot and shaking the camera around,” said Vaughn in an interview this week. “After a while, I’m thinking, this is really boring, I’m reading the impact but I’m not knowing where the ball is or who is winning, who is losing and how close [we are] to the end.”

Vaughn thinks the biggest problem is screenwriting 101: make sure the action is fully integrated into the narrative and the audience is emotionally invested in the action scenes. »


- Chris O'Falt

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‘mother!’: Darren Aronofsky Reacts to ‘F’ CinemaScore, Says ‘Some People Are Not Going to Want to Listen’

21 hours ago

“mother!” isn’t exactly cleaning up at the multiplex, not that Darren Aronofsky seems terribly let down. His enigmatic thriller scored a rare “F” from CinemaScore, a dubious badge of honor shared with movies both good (Steven Soderbergh’s “Solaris”) and bad (“I Know Who Killed Me”); the writer/director has responded to that failing grade on Kpcc’s the Frame, expressing neither surprise nor disappointment.

Read More:Paramount Defends ‘mother!’ Against Bad Box Office and ‘F’ CinemaScore: ‘This Movie is Brave’

Aronofsky, who most recently directed “Noah” and “Black Swan,” calls his movie a reflection of the way currently things are in the world — so of course it isn’t winning audiences over en masse. Here are his full comments:

“What’s interesting about that is, like, how if you walk out of this movie are you not going to give it an ‘F?’ It’s a punch. It’s a total punch. »


- Michael Nordine

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