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Review: 'Orphan Black' Season 3, Episode 2, 'Transitory Sacrifices of Crisis': Things Get Personal

8 hours ago

Previously: 'Orphan Black' Season 3, Episode 1, 'The Weight of This Combination': Let’s Get It Started Cloning Around With Sarah desperate to track down Helena and refusing to blow Dodge until she can figure out a way to keep everyone in her life safe, she relapsed into something of a fantasy world with Cal this week. Although the dream to settle down and be a happy little family with their daughter was swell, the Castor clones had other thoughts on the subject when they became equally desperate for a whole new set of reasons. Watching Sarah and Rudy strive for the same things — to keep those in their lives safe—while treating each other as the enemy was frustrating, but it also started laying down the foundation for the ultimate clone-on-clone-on-clones scene we just know is coming up at some point this season. Science Class With Cosima on the »


- Amber Dowling

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Tribeca: Jason Sudeikis on How and When to Improv in a Movie

18 hours ago

Read More: Meet the 2015 Tribeca Filmmakers #54 : Sean Mewshaw Tackles Small-Town Grief in 'Tumbledown' With his dark beard and deep, rich voice, Jason Sudeikis is a powerful embodiment of 21st century masculinity, which makes you wonder why it took him so long to land plump romantic roles. The wait, it seems, was worth it. Sudeikis, who has had leading roles in a wide range of television and film comedies over the past decade — from "Saturday Night Live" to "30 Rock" and "We're the Millers" to "Horrible Bosses" — stars opposite Rebecca Hall in "Tumbledown," a romantic comedy from the married writer/director duo Desi Van Til and Sean Mewshaw, set in rural Maine. The film derives inspiration from the stories of brilliant real-life singer-songwriters like Nick Drake and Jeff Buckley whose lives were cut short too soon. Hall plays the grieving widow of a famous folk singer who decides to hire Sudeikis'. »


- Shipra Harbola Gupta

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TV’s Most Dapper Gentlemen: Costume Designers Reveal the Secrets of Suits

19 hours ago

Read More: 'Penny Dreadful' Costume Designer Gabriella Pescucci on Her Dreadfully Delicious Designs There's certainly no shortage of handsome men on television these days, but there is just something about a suit and tie that will really melt a heart. Of late, more and more men are appearing on the small screen as polished and sophisticated professionals, and their wardrobes tell a story about who they are, where they come from and what we need to know about them. However, as much as audiences admire these characters, It takes much more than a pair of broad shoulders to work a suit. To do it really, really well requires a creative eye, a keen sense of style, and the immaculate art of synthesis that can only be found in the costumers on TV's most popular shows. From Lemond Bishop to President Grant to Don Draper, every suit tells a story. »


- Sundi Rose-Holt

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Tribeca: Here's Why the Coen Brothers' Films Always Sound Magnificent

24 April 2015 6:07 PM, PDT

Read More: Coen Brothers to Chair Jury at 68th Cannes Film Festival When it comes to talking about their work with the press, Joel and Ethan Coen aren't the most forthcoming. Close reading of their work can only get us so far -- which is where conversations with key members of the Coens' crew, such as composer Carter Burwell and sound recordist Skip Lievsay, can fill in certain gaps by sharing some of their experiences working with the legendary sibling directing duo. Earlier this week as part of the Tribeca Film Festival, Burwell and Lievsay participated in a conversation with Glenn Kiser, the Director of the Dolby Institute. The discussion incorporated screenings of clips from Coen Brothers films that both Burwell and Lievsay had worked on, but the overall arc of the conversation, which we outline below, provided a unique perspective on how sound design plays into the greatness that is a Coen Brothers film. »


- Shipra Harbola Gupta

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The Best Documentary Filmmaking Advice from Full Frame Documentary Film Festival

24 April 2015 4:44 PM, PDT

The Full Frame Documentary Film Festival isn't just a longstanding showcase for the art of nonfiction film. It's also where the people who make those films gather, and where aspiring documentarians can bend their ears without fighting a crowd. It's a place where you might sit down to grab a quick bit between films and find Albert Maysles doing the same at the other end of your table, or where you can run into an Oscar-nominated filmmaker who tells you that "Giovanni and the Water Ballet" a half-hour documentary about a 10-year-old boy trying to make it to Holland's synchronized swimming championships, is the best narrative he's seen in years, and the next day it wins the festival's jury award. Read More: Barbara Kopple, D.A. Pennebaker and Other Documentary Filmmakers on the Film Preservation Crisis The "Give It to Me Straight" panel, which gathered experienced documentary filmmakers to share the wisdom of their long careers, »


- Sam Adams

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How the Team Behind 'Unfriended' Pulled Off the Most Ingenious Horror Film in Years

24 April 2015 4:09 PM, PDT

Read More: The Death-by-Skype Horror Movie 'Unfriended' is an Unlikely Critical Hit Let's face it -- the majority of horror films released by studios nowadays are neither all that scary or particularly creative. Universal's current micro-budget hit "Unfriended," written by Nelson Greaves and directed by Leo Gabriadze, is both.  Dreamed up by "Wanted" director Timur Bekmambetov, "Unfriended" plays out entirely on a MacBook screen, where six high school students -- plus one sinister seventh party -- group chat on Skype on the one-year anniversary of their classmate Laura Barns' suicide. When the mystery user claims to be Barns, the teens start dying, one by one.  The ingenious execution of "Unfriended" (who knew static webcam images could induce suspense?) hasn't gone unnoticed by film critics, many of whom embraced the film prior to its theatrical launch last week -- a rarity for the horror genre. For a roundup of the positive. »


- Nigel M Smith

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Indiewire Podcast: Remembering Richard Corliss, Examining Cannes and Debating 'Avengers'

24 April 2015 4:03 PM, PDT

In this week's episode, Kohn and Thompson remember the late film critic Richard Corliss, who was instrumental in Thompson's early career. They also discuss the latest additions to the Cannes Film Festival lineup as well as their disappointment over "Avengers: Age of Ultron" and what it means for the future of blockbuster filmmaking. Screen Talk is available on iTunes. You can subscribe here or via RSS. Share your feedback with Thompson and Kohn on Twitter or sound off in the comments. Browse previous installments here, review the show on iTunes and be sure to let us know if you'd like to hear the hosts address specific issues in upcoming editions of Screen Talk. Read More: Anne Thompson Remembers Richard Corliss »


- Indiewire

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Tribeca: Cary Fukunaga On 'True Detective,' Netflix's 'Beasts of No Nation' Release, and Stephen King's 'It'

24 April 2015 3:30 PM, PDT

James Schamus and Cary Fukunaga are longtime friends, and their rapport was on full display when the two sat down at the Tribeca Film Festival yesterday. Schamus, accomplished producer and former CEO of Focus Features, called Fukunaga a "rising superstar" and promised the panel would cover more ground than the final episode of "True Detective" Season 1. (He was almost telling the truth.) Here's what we learned from their discussion. "True Detective" was an insane, massive shooting experience. "There's a tremendous amount of optimism in pre-production about what you can accomplish," Fukunaga said. "You're like, oh, this will be easy, we'll get that today and then we'll move on to something else. Because 'True Detective' was such a massive beast, the pre-production aspect required meeting upon meeting...We did all the interrogation stuff in three days. One day, McConaughey did 29 pages of text." He added that much of the planning. »


- Emily Buder

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There Are Two New Russell Brand Documentaries, But Only One of Them is Worth Seeing

24 April 2015 3:13 PM, PDT

Read More: SXSW Review: Russell Brand Needs to Make Peace With Ondi Timoner's 'Brand: A Second Coming' British standup comedian and actor Russell Brand's radical transformation into a rambunctious ideologue assailing the persecution of the lower classes has baffled his fellow citizens while going largely ignored in America, but that's hardly slowed down his passionate crusade. Brand's enviable cause received fascinating context in Ondi Timoner's recent "Brand: A Second Coming," which tracked its subject from his humble beginnings through various struggles with drugs, women and fame before the most recent and complicated phase of his public life. While the star turned his back on Timoner's project, citing the sensitivities associated with confronting his troubled past, it turns out he had an authorized encapsulation of his current state in the pipeline. "The Emperor's New Clothes," which is credited as being "made by" Brand and prolific British. »


- Eric Kohn

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Watch: Abigail Breslin and Arnold Schwarzenegger Have a Heart to Heart in New 'Maggie' Clip

24 April 2015 1:32 PM, PDT

Read More: Tribeca Review: Arnold Schwarzenegger Surprises in Zombie Drama 'Maggie' Three clips have been released for the Arnold Schwarzenegger zombie drama "Maggie," which made its debut at this year's Tribeca Film Festival. The film stars Schwarzenegger as Wade, a small-town farmer and father of teenager Maggie (Abigail Breslin) who has been bitten by a zombie. Even as Maggie's condition worsens, Wade continues to fight in an effort to protect his daughter. In the clip above, we get to see the nature of this father-daughter relationship in action, as Maggie expresses deep concern over her father's decision to rescue her. The clips also tease a strained relationship between Wade, Maggie and her stepmother (Jolely Richardson), who appears to be more overtly disturbed by her stepdaughter's condition than her husband. It should be interesting to watch the tension grow between Wade and his seemingly not-so-supportive wife. "Maggie" will »


- Jena Keahon

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Watch: Barbara Kopple, D.A. Pennebaker and Other Documentary Filmmakers on the Film Preservation Crisis

24 April 2015 1:02 PM, PDT

In our digital age, the preservation of older documentary footage is far from guaranteed. To highlight the importance of the issue, The International Documentary Association (Ida) and Doc NYC hosted the first-ever two-day Documentary Preservation Summit, which began March 31 and ended on April 1 at IFC Center. Filmmakers and preservation experts attended the event to speak about the issue of important documentaries being lost, and discussed strategies for preserving and archiving these wonderful films.  If you missed the summit, you can view several of the panels below in their entirety: Read More: 5 Key Takeaways from the Documentary Film Preservation Summit Keynote: A call to action for documentary preservation speakers   During this panel, Michael Donaldson (fair use attorney), Barbara Kopple (filmmaker), D.A. Pennebaker (filmmaker), Sandra Schulberg (IndieCollect) and moderator Thom Powers (Doc NYC) talked about the importance of preserving »


- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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Watch: Hailee Steinfeld is an Assassin Turned High Schooler in 'Barely Lethal' Trailer

24 April 2015 12:36 PM, PDT

Read More: Hailee Steinfeld to Play Carrie Pilby in Ya Adaptation If Matthew Vaughn's box office hit "Kingsman: The Secret Service" proved anything earlier this year, it's that audiences never get too tired of a cocky-teenager-turned-kickass-assassin storyline. While such a character is a staple of young-adult spy movies, director Kyle Newman and star Hailee Steinfeld are shaking the genre up in this summer's action-comedy "Barely Lethal." Steinfeld stars as Megan Walsh, a ruthless teenage special ops agent who yearns for a normal adolescence. After faking her own death and assuming the role of an exchange student, the agent quickly learns that surviving the treacherous waters of a typical American high school can be even more difficult than international espionage. "Barely Lethal' co-stars Samuel L. Jackson, Jessica Alba, Sophie Turner, Dove Cameron and Thomas Mann. The film will be available on DirectTV beginning April 30. A theatrical »


- Zack Sharf

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Watch: David Oyelowo Unravels in New Teaser and Poster for HBO Films' 'Nightingale'

24 April 2015 11:05 AM, PDT

Read More: 'Selma' Star David Oyelowo Gets Frank About Race in Hollywood Fans of David Oyelowo won't want to miss the trailer for "Nightingale," a single-character, single-location drama following a war veteran who slowly loses control over his mind during the 80-minute film. Executive producer Brad Pitt of Plan B Entertainment was enthusiastic about the film's debut. "We are thrilled and honored to help bring 'Nightingale' to an audience," he said in the press release. "Sincere props to our friends at HBO for giving this extraordinary and courageous film its day." Written by first-time writer Frederick Mensch, "Nightingale" was directed by Elliott Lester and produced by Bn Films in association with Sea Smoke Entertainment and Yoruba Saxon Productions. It is presented by HBO Films in association with Plan B Entertainment. "Nightingale" premieres May 29 on HBO at 9pm. Check out the trailer above. Read More: Watch: 'Selma'. »


- Becca Nadler

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Julianne Moore Calls VOD Inferior to Theatrical Experience

24 April 2015 10:41 AM, PDT

Julianne Moore and Sony Pictures Classics co-president Tom Bernard bashed day-and-date VOD releases on a panel on Thursday, the last day of CinemaCon. Read More: National Theater Owners Chief Declares 2015 'The Year of Women' at the Box Office Moore, who won an Academy Award for her role in "Still Alice" -- which was released by Spc -- insisted that there's no substitute for seeing a feature film in a theater. "We're always so disappointed when you hear the words, 'day-and-date.' I think, 'oh, really?' We work very hard as creators in creating a theatrical experience. I'm married to a director [Bart Freundlich], and a movie never looks the same on television," she said, according to The Hollywood Reporter. Bernard said that doing a day-and-date releases for some films confuses audiences. Sony Pictures Classics has not released any films day-and-date. "The exhibitors are the gatekeepers and they choose the movies that are worthy of playing in. »


- Paula Bernstein

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Watch: Gemma Arterton Sees Life Imitate Art in 'Gemma Bovery' Trailer

24 April 2015 9:30 AM, PDT

Read More: Gemma Arterton Turns Heads in Exclusive 'Gemma Bovery' Poster Based on Posy Simmonds' graphic novel of the same name, "Gemma Bovery" is a cinematic adaptation of Flaubert's classic, anti-romantic novel "Madame Bovary." The film revolves around British beauty Gemma (Gemma Arterton) who moves to a provincial French town with her husband Charles Bovery (Jason Flemyng). There, she befriends local baker Martin Joubert (Fabrice Luchini), who sets out to be her mentor. In the trailer, we see how clearly the plot mirrors that of Flaubert's novel. What makes this adaptation fresh, however, is that Joubert is apparently a fan of "Madame Bovary" and is fully aware of the parallels between the novel and this woman's life. It should be interesting to see how this self-awareness unfolds throughout the film. "Gemma Bovery" opens May 29 in select theaters. Check out the trailer above. Read More: Gemma Arterton On Life After James Bond, »


- Jena Keahon

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Watch: Alicia Vikander Heads to Wwi in Gorgeous 'Testament of Youth' Trailer

24 April 2015 9:27 AM, PDT

Read More: Alicia Vikander on Playing a Robot in 'Ex Machina' Alicia Vikander's star-making performance as robot Ava in "Ex Machina" (now playing nationwide) is one of the cinematic highlights of the year thus far, and luckily fans won't have to wait long to see the 26-year-old Swedish beauty back on the big screen. Following a successful release in Britain earlier this year, James Kent's Wwi period piece "Testament of Youth," starring Vikander and "Game of Thrones" headliner Kit Harington, will hit domestic theaters this June. Based on the 1933 memoir of the same name by Vera Brittain, "Youth" recounts the promising Oxford student's life and the sacrifice she made to become a Wwi nurse after her fiancé (Harington), brother and friends were all sent to the front lines. Brittain's voluntary service led her from London to Malta and France and forced her to confront the horrors of battle »


- Zack Sharf

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Review: 'Wayward Pines' Blows Its Chance for True Crazy Greatness

24 April 2015 8:49 AM, PDT

"Wayward Pines," the first big television venture by M. Night Shyamalan (whose career went from legendary to, ahem, troubled after a string of creatively and financially disastrous films) has been on our much-anticipated list for some time. Not just because of the talent involved, but because if it was awesome, it could serve as some sort of wonderful "Twin Peaks"-esque diversion this summer. So yesterday's surprise announcement that the first episode would be available globally for a week-long sneak preview was welcome news; as soon as it went live, we were watching. Unfortunately, what could have been something really special makes a few wrong turns. "Wayward Pines" stars Matt Dillon as Ethan Burke, a Secret Service agent who finds himself trapped in a quaint little town where no one is what they seem, including his former partner (Carla Gugino), who's playing a Stepford Wife. Is Burke's troubled past, including a history of mental illness, »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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Watch: 'Game of Thrones' Meets 'Too Many Cooks' for Fun Mash-Up Or Helpful Character Guide?

24 April 2015 8:19 AM, PDT

Read More: 'SNL' Brings 'Game of Thrones' to John Singleton's 'South Centros' About six months ago, Adult Swim released a short called "Too Many Cooks," which became an online sensation with more than 7 million views. Now, some beautiful weirdo has created a "Game of Thrones"-inspired version of the video. Even though "Too Many Cooks" parodies the drawn-out opening credits often used by sitcoms in the '80s and '90s, it works surprisingly well with "Game of Thrones." Well, maybe it's not so surprising considering the enormity of George R.R. Martin's world. What makes the parody even more hilarious is that unlike the original "Too Many Cooks" video, this can list character names without repetition for the full 11 minutes. "Game of Thrones" airs Sundays at 9pm on HBO. Check out the video above. Read More: Kill this Character, Kill the Show: Who 'Game of Thrones' Needs »


- Jena Keahon

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Watch: 'SNL' Editor Adam Epstein Talks the 'Drug Rush' of Digital Shorts

24 April 2015 8:04 AM, PDT

Read More: SNL's 5 Best Digital Shorts, er, Pre-Recorded Sketches of the Season The digital short has become an integral "Saturday Night Live" centerpiece over the past decade thanks to poster child Andy Samberg, but what would such viral hits like "Housewives of Disney," "The Beygency" and "Wes Anderson Horror" be without editor Adam Epstein? You probably don't know his name or his face, but Epstein's post-production work for the NBC sketch comedy show has provided audiences with one viral sensation after the next. As part of the Nab Creative Masters Series, Epstein joined Meagan Keane, senior marketing manager at Adobe, for a lengthy discussion about his comedy roots and the "drug rush" that comes with editing for "SNL" digital shorts. Given how the shorts start production on Mondays and don't get delivered to air until around 10 minutes before broadcast, somehow the "drug rush" comparison seems »


- Zack Sharf

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Vote for Project of the Week: 'REframe,''Blast Beat,' 'The Color of Fire' or 'Border Crossing'?

24 April 2015 8:01 AM, PDT

The winning filmmaker will receive a digital distribution consultation from SnagFilms and will become a candidate for the April Project of the Month. That winner will be awarded with a creative consultation from the fine folks at the Tribeca Film Institute and will be in the running for Project of the Year. The four projects up for this week's Project of the Week are listed below (with descriptions courtesy of the filmmakers). You can vote at the bottom of the page. REframe: In a search for peace a man reframes his mother's murder (by his father), hoping to touch other victims of domestic violence along the way. Blast Beat: An uber-metalized American Latino adventure that'll kick your ass back to the Y2K   The Color of Fire: A 15-year-old enlists as a German soldier under Hitler's rule for the last month of WWII. 70 years later, he revisits those experiences. Border Crossing »


- Indiewire

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