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Review: 'Orphan Black' Season 3, Episode 1, 'The Weight of This Combination': Let’s Get It Started

3 hours ago

Read More: Watch: It's Clone vs. Clone in 'Orphan Black' Season 3 Premiere Teaser Clone of the WeekSarah takes center stage in most episodes of "Orphan Black," and the Season 3 return was no exception. Just when the delinquent clone was trying to get on with life as normal — or as normal as possible, knowing she had a supportive figure at Dyad in the form of Dr. Marian Bowles (Michelle Forbes), the intensity ramped back up when she realized Helena was missing. Though we briefly caught up with Alison (and a now jobless Donnie), and felt for Cosima during her breakup with Delphine, it was Sarah’s journey that drove the action throughout and set up several of the plot points leading into the rest of the season. Science Class While Cosima and Scott began to examine the tattered, marked up copy of “The Island of Doctor Moreau” in more detail, »


- Amber Dowling

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Tribeca Exclusive: 'Jackrabbit' Filmmakers Release '80s-inspired Video Game

9 hours ago

Read More: The 2015 Indiewire Tribeca Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During Run of Festival According to "Jackrabbit" producer-turned-amateur-game-designer Joe Stankus, the idea to create a video game tied to the film came about by accident, as the result of a joke. The production didn't have any money in the budget to put towards a game. But, as Stankus told Indiewire over email earlier this week, "the more we talked about it the more we were interested in the idea." "Even though 'Jackrabbit' was a low-budget indie," he continued. "I felt the world Carleton [Ranney] created was so rich that it deserved to spread out a little and, given the thematic importance that arcade games play in the movie, it just seemed like the right thing to do." Set in a post-apocalyptic world where everyone is under constant surveillance, "Jackrabbit" tells the story of two young hackers who come from two completely. »


- Shipra Harbola Gupta

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Alternative Comedy Legend Paul F. Tompkins on the 'Mr. Show' Reunion, Paranoia, Podcasts and Puppets

16 hours ago

Read More: How To Create an Animated Comedy Empire, According to the Creator of Fox's Adhd So the other day, I stood on a soundstage and watched two grown men talk to a puppet and shove their faces into sheet cakes. The gag seemed a pretty standard sort of bit, though, for Fusion's "No, You Shut Up," the sketch comedy series featuring Paul F. Tompkins and a variety of celebrity guests that's now entering its third season. If you're passionate about comedy, your ears pricked up just then when Tompkins' name came up, and even if you're just a casual entertainment fan, then it's likely you've sampled some of his work, ranging from writing and performing on the classic HBO series "Mr. Show" to hosting and acting gigs to voice-over work on shows like "BoJack Horseman" to countless podcast appearances. In the alternative comedy scene, Tompkins is a bit of a god. »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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Tribeca Review: Powerful 'Among the Believers' Reveals the Origins of Religious Extremism

16 hours ago

Read More: The 2015 Indiewire Tribeca Bible: Every Review, Interview and News Item Posted During Run of Festival Rarely are the origins of extremism obvious to those it affects throughout the world. For Americans, religious extremism is hardly a part of daily life. In Pakistan, however, the numerous madrassas around the country make for a tense and frightening way of life, and with the growing threats of groups like Isis and Boko Haram extending throughout the region, the setting of the so-called schools make for powerful documentary.  For "Among the Believers," directors Hemal Trivedi and Mohammed Ali Naqvi were granted unprecedented access to Maulana Aziz, a Muslim leader who runs The Red Mosque, an organization that trains children to devote their lives to holy war. Thousands of children out of his schools have pledged their allegiance to Isis. Aziz is not an intimidating presence physically, but his unwavering devotion and fear-provoking rhetoric give him an. »


- Casey Cipriani

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Tribeca Review: 'Orion: The Man Who Would Be King' is Mysterious and Depressing

17 April 2015 4:30 PM, PDT

Read More: Tribeca: Watch Indiewire Talk to Ethan Hawke, Taylor Schilling, Olivia Wilde and More at the Apple Store When Elvis Presley died in 1977, Orion was born. Director Jeanie Finlay's documentary "Orion: The Man Who Would Be King," which premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival, follows the story of Jimmy "Orion" Ellis, a masked singer whose voice sounded exactly like that of the King of Rock. Not only did the crooner have the voice, but he also had the look -- tall and thin with a black pompadour -- leading many fans to believe that Elvis must have faked his own death and was intent on wearing a mask while he continued to perform. Finlay's documentary opens with the pandemonium surrounding Presley's death, when young women were crying and fainting in the summer heat over the news that their favorite god-like singer was dead. The film then quickly shifts to Ellis' childhood, »


- Casey Cipriani

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Top Three Subjects Vie for DirecTV's 'Next Great American Documentary'

17 April 2015 3:24 PM, PDT

Read More: Attention, Filmmakers: Tongal and DirecTV Team Are Looking for 'The Next Great American Documentary' "The Next Great American Documentary," the competition project by DirecTV and filmmaking community Tongal, has chosen its top three documentary subjects. The competition, which began in March, crowdsourced ideas for a new documentary film by asking talented individuals to submit their ideas for a documentary film, with the winner given the potential to turn their concept into an actual film to be aired on DirecTV's Audience Network. "We're really impressed by the diversity and quality of the final three subjects for this film project," said Tongal founder James De Julio. "Tongal received nearly 300 potential film subject submissions, and the public voting helped to narrow down the finalists. In the next phase, directors will pitch to bring these subjects to life, which is exciting because it's the first time we get to visually experience the. »

- Becca Nadler

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Academy Award-Winning Costumer Designer Catherine Martin on Working with Husband Baz Luhrmann

17 April 2015 3:13 PM, PDT

Academy Award-winning costume/ production designer Catherine Martin took part in "Tribeca Talks: Master Class: Get The Look" during the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival on April 17. The event featured a conversation between Martin and Vogue's International Editor-at-Large Hamish Bowles. Martin, or "Cm" as she is known in the industry, has helped to create some of the most distinctive on-screen movie moments of all time, designing films such as "Moulin Rouge," "The Great Gatsby" and "Strictly Ballroom." She has worked on all of director Baz Luhrmann's projects -- and she is also married to him.  Read More: Watch: 'Inherent Vice' Costume Designer Mark Bridges Takes You Into The Closet Here are some highlights from the discussion: Getting into the business "I was the nerdy kid who loved historical costumes," said Martin of her childhood. "I loved the glamour and make believe of what clothes can do for you." »


- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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Kino Lorber Acquires Award-Winning Mexican Feature 'Güeros'

17 April 2015 2:35 PM, PDT

Read More: Alonso Ruizpalacios Writes a Love Letter to Mexico City with 'Gueros' Kino Lorber has acquired all North American rights to director Alonso Ruizpalacios' feature debut "Güeros." The film won Best First Feature at the 2014 Berlin International Film Festival, Best Cinematography at last year's Tribeca Film Festival, and the Special Jury Mention for Screenwriting and New Auteurs Audience Award at 2014's AFI Fest. "Güeros" was also recently nominated for 12 Ariel Awards, receiving the most nominations of any other title this year. According to the film's official synopsis, "'Güeros' is set in 1999, when a year-long university strike both engaged and set adrift thousands of students in Mexico City. Sombra and Santos, who had been living in angst-ridden limbo due to the strike, begin to look for strange ways to kill time. The unexpected arrival of Tomás, Sombra’s kid brother, pushes the trio into a long road trip in search of the. »


- Jena Keahon

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Tribeca: Alma Har'el and Shia Labeouf Premiere Hypnotic Footage From 'LoveTrue'

17 April 2015 2:30 PM, PDT

Read More: "Bombay Beach" Director Alma Har'el: "I'm Not a Documentarian, or a Filmmaker, or Anything." Last night at New York's School for Visual Arts, a number of Tribeca Film Festival attendees saw an exclusive preview of scenes from Alma Har'el's new film "LoveTrue." Har'el returned to Tribeca this year after winning the festival's Grand Jury Prize for Best Documentary in 2011 with "Bombay Beach," a surreal and beautiful portrait of a small town in the California desert. After directing Shia Labeouf in the music video for Sigur Rós' "Fjögur píanó," Har'el and the actor teamed up for "LoveTrue," which she directed and he produced. The two discussed the project in between three clips from the film. "LoveTrue" is as of yet a work in progress, to be completed next year. The film blurs the line between documentary and fiction, interweaving three distinct (true) love stories of couples living. »


- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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Tribeca Review: In 'Come Down Molly,' Motherhood is a Bad Drug Trip

17 April 2015 2:19 PM, PDT

When we first meet Molly, she's taking care of her toddler in a dark, empty apartment. As she goes through the motions of her son's bedtime routine, claustrophobic cinematography and a zombielike countenance make one thing abundantly clear: she'd rather be anywhere but here. So she decides to leave. When her husband comes home, Molly, on the verge of a breakdown, announces her intentions to take a last-minute weekend road trip to an old friend's country home. To her husband's chagrin, she offers little in the way of explanation—"I'm stuck here, with him, and you're gone all the time"—and storms off the scene. She seems conflicted about leaving in this fashion and spends most of the drive fighting back sobs. When she arrives, Molly enters another emotionally-charged situation: Her friends can barely suppress their shock at seeing her, and she's greeted with a mixed bag of resentment and elation. »

- Emily Buder

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Tribeca Review: James Franco Embraces Masochism in Tone-Deaf 'The Adderall Diaries'

17 April 2015 2:12 PM, PDT

James Franco is no stranger to playing troubled souls. Lately, it seems he prefers to play them in troubled films, too. Pamela Romanowsky's "The Adderall Diaries," adapted from the best-selling memoir by Stephen Elliott, is a valiant but unsuccessful effort in genre-bending. Much like its protagonist, the film suffers from an identity crisis.  "We're all victims of our fathers," writes a scruffy and tattooed Stephen Elliott (Franco). He's sitting pretty at the top of newfound literary success, having published a critically-acclaimed memoir about the abuse he suffered at the hands of his sadistic father (Ed Harris). Up next is a series of publishing deals that promise more money and fame, but Elliott is more interested in a high-profile murder trial he sees on the news. He latches on to the story, convinced this will rescue him from writer's block. ("It'll be my 'In Cold Blood,' he says to his editor. »


- Emily Buder

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Meet the 2015 Tribeca Filmmakers #44: What It Means to Have a Nazi Father Explored in 'A Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did'

17 April 2015 1:52 PM, PDT

Read More: Meet the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival Filmmakers David Evans' documentary "A Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did" explores what it means to grow up as the child of a mass murderer. While studying the Nuremberg trials, a lawyer becomes interested in the histories of two men, both sons of famous Nazi Governors. The men have completely contrasting perspectives on their father's involvement in the war, and "A Nazi Legacy" explores this curiosity, ruminating on the nature of individual perception.  What's your film about in 140 characters or less? Three men journey through Europe to the killing fields of war-time Poland; one of them is Jewish, the other two are sons of senior Nazis. Now what's it Really about? It's about the massive swells of historical destiny and the tiny moments that stay in a person's memory forever: about the roots of Ukrainian nationalism in the bloody turmoil of the Second World War, »


- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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Meet the 2015 Tribeca Filmmakers #43: Man Takes Homeless Kids Under His Wing in 'Crocodile Gennadiy'

17 April 2015 1:50 PM, PDT

Read More: Meet the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival Filmmakers "Crocodile Gennadiy" is the second film from director Steve Hoover, who won the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award for his doc "Blood Brother" at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival. Hoover's second feature tells the story of a man called Crodocile Gennadiy, who works to help homeless, drug-addicted young people on the streets of Mariupol, Ukraine. Bravely, Gennadiy also challenges the city's dealers and abusers, and although he meets with resistance, Gennadiy is steadfast in continuing his work. Although the crew dealt with turbulence while filming in Ukraine, they managed to craft a powerful film about moral ambiguity and civic responsibilities.  What's your film about in 140 characters or less? Gennadiy, a pastor from Mariupol Ukraine, who's known for abducting homeless kids from the streets of his city. Now what's it Really about? Moral ambiguity, vigilantism, drugs, alcohol, systemic »


- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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From Virtual Reality to Interactive Documentaries: 'Sensory Stories' Showcases Immersive Storytelling

17 April 2015 1:49 PM, PDT

Read More: Straight From Sundance, Vincent Morriset's Immersive 'Way to Go' Is Free Online Conceived and organized by Future of Storytelling (FoST), "Sensory Stories," a new exhibition at the Museum of the Moving Image (MoMI) in New York City, will introduce audiences to innovative new methods of engaging with visual narratives. The exhibition, which will run from April 18–July 26, 2015, provides a unique and enthralling experience, showing off fascinating new technologies and demonstrating their storytelling value in the process. The 17 works featured range from virtual reality narratives to interactive journalistic accounts. A New Way to Tell Stories"One of our goals .. is to bring the newest technologies to the community to inspire them to think about how they are going to use them," explained FoST founder Charles Melcher at a press preview for the new exhibit. "The focus of this show is to explore the technologies that are bringing us. »


- David Canfield

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Meet the 2015 Tribeca Filmmakers #42: 'TransFatty Lives' Reveals What It's Like Living With Als

17 April 2015 1:31 PM, PDT

Read More: Meet the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival Filmmakers Patrick O'Brien's "TransFatty Lives," filmed over 10 years, tells the intimate story of what it's like to live with Als (a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease). A onetime NYC deejay and Internet superstar known as "TransFatty," O'Brien began to document his life in 2005, after being diagnosed with Als and given only 2-5 years to live. The film unflinchingly looks the possibility of death in the face, while at the same time exploring all the things that make life worth living.  What's your film about in 140 characters or less? Boy becomes gimp, gimp makes film, gimp gets girl, girl and gimp have baby, gimp loses girl, gimp loses fuckin’ mind, gimp goes down in cinema history. Now what's it Really about? "TransFatty Lives" is a 10-year epic visual diary. It's an emotional rollercoaster. It takes you into the dark heart of Als (a. »


- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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'Door Into the Dark' Immerses You in Darkness and Lets You Find Your Way Out

17 April 2015 12:32 PM, PDT

We talk a lot about immersive storytelling, but "Door Into the Dark" is a wholly original immersive storytelling experience which literally immerses you into the story. Though Indiewire first experienced it at Sheffield Doc/Fest 2014, it is being presented as part of Storyscapes at this year's Tribeca Film Festival.  The immersive documentary plunges you deep into the dark. It's a visceral experience that leaves you vulnerable -- blindfolded, shoeless and alone as you are introduced to an array of characters who lead you along the way and recount their own journeys into the unknown. Read More: Straight from Sundance, Vincent Moriset's 'Way to Go' is Free Online I don't want to give away too many details that will spoil the experience for you if and when it comes to your town. But here are some glimpses into the "Door Into the Dark" experience: After entering and taking a »


- Paula Bernstein

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First-Time Director Digs Deep to Trace Origins of the So-Called Gay Voice in 'Do I Sound Gay?'

17 April 2015 12:09 PM, PDT

Wracked with insecurity following a breakup in his 40s, journalist and first-time director David Thorpe set out to tackle the question of whether he sounded "too gay," speaking with many other gay men along the way about their own distinctive voices. The documentary, aptly titled "Do I Sound Gay?" played last weekend at the Dallas International Film Festival and opens July 10 in select theaters. Thorpe meets with speech pathologists, talks with friends and men off the street and interviews famous gay icons like Dan Savage, David Sedaris, Tim Gunn, Margaret Cho, Don Lemon and George Takei to about their struggles with sexuality, identity and the way their voices sound.  Thorpe investigates the way our society perceives men with effeminate speech, and delves deep into the history of the "gay voice," and the myriad ways it has spurred harassment and disdain. "Do I Sound Gay" follows Thorpe's process in putting his own voice back into. »


- Anya Jaremko-Greenwold

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Indiewire Podcast: Here's What We Think About This Year's Cannes Lineup

17 April 2015 10:51 AM, PDT

Read More: 5 Observations from the 2015 Cannes Film Festival Lineup This week, Kohn and Thompson examine the recent announcement of the 2015 Cannes Film Festival lineup while also delving into bigger questions surrounding the purpose of film festivals as a whole, the increasing role of television and a whole bunch of other issues. They also tackle another round of leaked Sony e-mails and discuss some of this week's new releases. Screen Talk is available on iTunes. You can subscribe here or via RSS. Share your feedback with Thompson and Kohn on Twitter or sound off in the comments. Browse previous installments here, review the show on iTunes and be sure to let us know if you'd like to hear the hosts address specific issues in upcoming editions of Screen Talk. Read More: Digging Into the Cannes Lineup »

- Indiewire

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Watch: Cannes 2015 Entry 'The Tale of Tales' Trailer Will Blow Your Mind and Gross You Out (Nsfw)

17 April 2015 10:51 AM, PDT

Read More: Cannes Wish List: 20 Films We Hope to See at the 2015 Festival Anyone who thought that Disney's "Cinderella" wasn't dark enough need only wait for "The Tale of Tales," Italian filmmaker Matteo Garrone's 2015 entry to the Palme d'Or competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Be warned though, this trailer is not for the faint of heart. Based on a 17th century collection of fairy tales by Italian author Giambattista Basile, the film weaves realistic and fantastical elements together into three different storylines, one of which involves Salma Hayek eating the heart of a giant beast. Vincent Cassel, John C. Reilly and Toby Jones also star. Matteo Garrone is no stranger to competition—he won the Grand Prix at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival for his film "Reality." "The Tale of Tales" will mark his English-language film debut, and will premiere in May 2015 at Cannes.  Read More: 2015 Cannes Film »


- Becca Nadler

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Watch: Coming-of-Age Gets a Fresh Hip-Hop Spin in Full-Length 'Dope' Trailer

17 April 2015 10:43 AM, PDT

Read More: Watch: Experimental 'Dope' Trailer Teases Vibrant Coming-of-Age Story Following last month's successful teaser, Open Road Films has finally dropped the full-length trailer for writer-director Rick Famuyiwa's vibrant coming-of-age comedy, "Dope." A favorite among critics and audiences at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, the movie's marketing campaign is picking up speed and showcasing its fresh feel and unique editing style. As the trailer above makes clear, "Dope" puts a hip-hop spin on the traditional coming-of-age genre. Shameik Moore stars as Malcolm, a teenager carefully surviving life in a tough Los Angeles neighborhood while juggling college applications and academic interviews. When a chance invitation leads to a drug dealer's underground party, an adventure begins that could allow him to make the jump from being a geek at the bottom to being himself. "Dope" co-stars Tony Revolori, Kiersey Clemons, Blake »


- Zack Sharf

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