Week of   « Prev | Next »

6 articles


Slideshow: Ethan Hawke, A-List Authors Highlight 2016 Chicago Printers Row Lit Fest

15 hours ago

Previous | Image 1 of 4 | NextActor Ethan Hawke for his new graphic novel, ‘Indeh.’

Chicago – Actor Ethan Hawke continues his plethora of vocations with the “hawkeing” of “Indeh,” his new graphic novel (co-authored with Greg Ruth) at the 2016 Printers Row Lit Fest in June. He was the celebrity spotlight, but the festival also featured the heavy hitters of the literary world, including notables Terry McMillan (“How Stella Got Her Groove Back”) and R.L.“Goosebumps” Stine.

The Printers Row Lit Fest bills itself as the Midwest’s “Largest Outdoor Literary Festival.” For two days, book buffs get to browse tome tables, meet their favorite scribes and bask in one of the Chicago’s most vital and historic downtown neighborhoods. The area of Chicago was once home to the heart of the printing and publishing industry in the city, and still serves as the host of the annual literature festival.

Photographer Joe Arce was on the scene, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: ‘Star Trek Beyond’ is a Blast of Starship Adventure

21 July 2016 8:07 PM, PDT

Chicago – In the equation of the Star Trek universe, what works best is the emotional connection to the iconic crew. Co-screenwriter Simon Pegg – also portraying Scotty – knew this, and saved the rebooted series from its bloated second film. A magnificent adventure awaits with ‘Star Trek Beyond.’

Rating: 4.0/5.0

The relationships and friendships are intact, even in the midst of a pretty complex mission. The genius of Star Trek are always the themes, and this story it’s about unity, transition, unfathomable evil and forgiveness. When you put such connective tissue through the crew genius of the Starship Enterprise, then a high-level space opera ensues, and it is done here with a passion and energy that the series desperately needed. Chris Pine solidifies his Captain Kirk and makes the character his own, and steers the rest of the seasoned cast, doing their all to make sure that the creation of Gene Roddenberry lives long and prospers, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Actor Paul Dooley of ‘Breaking Away,’ ‘Sixteen Candles’

21 July 2016 10:25 AM, PDT

Chicago – If there ever was a quintessential “Dad” in movies of the last generation, it would have to be Paul Dooley. The comedian and character actor is best known for portraying the patriarch in “Breaking Away” (1979) and “Sixteen Candles” (1984), but was also in director’s Robert Altman’s ‘ensemble’ and has had a stellar career.

The former “Paul Brown” was born in West Virginia, and studied acting at West Virginia University, before heading to New York City and a new career as Paul Dooley. He did stage work, stand-up comedy and the New York City version of The Second City (story below), before getting his big break in the original stage version of “The Odd Couple” in 1965, directed by the legendary Mike Nichols. While working the stage, he appeared in a number of commercials, eventually moving to Los Angeles to “be where the action is.”

The Dad: Paul Dooley, with Dennis Christopher, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Realistic, Difficult Lives Are Exposed in ‘Wiener-Dog’

20 July 2016 12:44 PM, PDT

Chicago –Director Todd Solondz has made a career out of not shying away from the most uncomfortable negativities of life. From extreme disconnection (“Happiness”) to pedophilia (“Life During Wartime”) to the sad rejection of pre-teen years (“Welcome to the Dollhouse”), Solondz pulls no punches. He achieves that harsh intent yet again in “Wiener-Dog.”

Rating: 4.0/5.0

This is an anthology film, about a group of disparate people who somehow own the same female dachshund dog (the long bodied wiener dogs). It contains a quasi-sequel to “Welcome to the Dollhouse” (1995) – with Greta Gerwig portraying main character Dawn Wiener as an adult – and it tests the patience of any dog loving person as the pooch goes through a series of sorrowful circumstances. But this is what real life is, and Solondz to his credit is not afraid to expose it cinematically. It is tough stuff, and also tends toward the cynical dark side of human nature, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Roger Ross Williams Creates a ‘Life, Animated’

20 July 2016 8:49 AM, PDT

Chicago – The mystery of the particulars within an autistic mind is a theme in a new documentary, as a man named Owen Suskind is profiled through his personal breakthroughs using the animated films of the Walt Disney Studios. Director Roger Ross Williams introduces the unusual journey in the compelling “Life, Animated.”

Based on the book by main subject’s father, Ron Suskind, the story is about Owen’s struggle to understand the world around him, while his autistic condition prevents clear comprehension. Now a grown man, he must transition into a halfway house to live on his own. All the while, it has been the animated films of the Walt Disney studios that have been his guiding life force, from boyhood to manhood.

The Disney Life of Owen Suskind is Explored in ‘Life, Animated’

Photo credit: The Orchard

Roger Ross Williams is a former broadcast journalist, and won an Oscar »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Director Matt Ross Promotes ‘Captain Fantastic’

18 July 2016 12:48 PM, PDT

Chicago – In this year of morally unique relationship films (“Swiss Army Man”), add the recently released “Captain Fantastic” to the mix. The film, written and directed by Matt Ross, is like a fable of unintended consequences, where a father raises his children to live off the ‘grid,’ away from typical 2016 civilization.

The father in the film is Viggo Mortensen (“Eastern Promises”), and the situation complicates itself when the mother of the six children dies, leaving the father no choice but to bring them back into “civilization” to attend the funeral. Writer/director Matt Ross – who as an actor also portrays Gavin Belson on HBO’s “Silicon Valley” – combines anarchist political philosophy with the extreme survival skills of the family to illustrate a point about our modern society, mostly in the sense that despite all our current abilities to technically communicate with one another, we still remain separated.

Matt Ross Directs »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


6 articles



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners