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Interview: The Confessions of Ted Neeley in 'Jesus Christ Superstar'

5 hours ago

Chicago – What can be said for a man who has portrayed Jesus close to 5,000 times, and starred in the definitive Broadway and film versions of the most famous rock opera about Christ? Ted Neeley is as virtuous as his famous title role in “Jesus Christ Superstar.”

Ted Neeley had the perfect show business start when coming of age in the 1960s. After venturing out of his native Texas to find a music career in Los Angeles, Neeley landed the role of Claude in both the Los Angeles and New York versions of “Hair” in 1969. The director of that show remembered Neeley when he was casting for the Broadway stage version of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice’s rock opera, “Jesus Christ Superstar.” He understudied in New York, and played the role on Broadway and in Los Angeles. That garnered interest from the producers of the 1973 film version, and he »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Interview: Larry ‘The Soup Nazi’ Thomas for ‘Mind Over Mindy’

29 July 2014 10:44 AM, PDT

Chicago – “No soup for you!” is one of the most memorable TV catchphrases of the 1990s, uttered into immortality by actor Larry Thomas on “Seinfeld,” who portrayed “The Soup Nazi.” Thomas was in the Chicago area recently to act in “Mind Over Mindy,” a new comedy from writer/director Robert Alaniz.

Larry Thomas was born in Brooklyn, and has been a working actor since the 1980s. He made his appearance on “Seinfeld” in 1996, and garnered an Emmy nomination for his Soup Nazi role, and he also appeared in the final episode of “Seinfeld.” Since then, he has continued to do character roles in TV and films such as “Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery,” “Arrested Development,” “Scrubs,’ a spoof called “Zero Dark Dirty” and Robert Alaniz’s previous film, “You Don’t Say!” He continues to appear as The Soup Nazi at events, including a recent 25th anniversary celebration of “Seinfeld’s” first season, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Film Review: ‘Happy Christmas’ is Au Naturale for Good or for Bland

28 July 2014 3:44 PM, PDT

Chicago – One thing that struck me about writer/director Joe Swanberg’s previous “Drinking Buddies,” and made it one of my more celebrated from 2013 despite not really loving it as a film, was its importance to those good ol’ independent movies. Here were big flashy stars like Olivia Wilde and Anna Kendrick, not just acting in a movie of a lower budget, but creating a wider appeal out of a previously very niche aspect, without the film form itself changing much.

Rating: 2.5/5.0

As much as it may have been marketed as a hipper romantic comedy, the movie had the naturalism of the same types of films that are made with a five-person crew, and are only shown in urban art houses for a week. The only thing really different about “Drinking Buddies” was that it featured Olivia Wilde playing the role usually reserved for the director’s friend’s girlfriend »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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