Week of   « Prev | Next »

3 articles


Film Review: Spirituality Over Dogma Uplifts ‘Heaven Is for Real’

2 hours ago

Chicago – It would be easy to dismiss “Heaven Is for Real,” given that it is based on the visions of the afterlife by a child, that just happens to coincide perfectly with Christian doctrine (Jesus, Angels, etc.). But there is more to this film in the sincerity of its spirituality, and it succeeds with that inspiration.

Rating: 3.5/5.0

The key was establishing a viable authenticity to the atmosphere of the vision, and get the right cast to deliver it, which director Randall Wallace (“Secretariat,” “We Were Soldiers”) was able to accomplish. He creates a hometown America that is part of the scenario, a luxurious and spacious hinterland of unyielding peace. The juxtaposition of the otherworldly garden of the boy’s vision with the wonder of earth creates a “heaven” that is for real, if we open our eyes. That spirit of simplicity becomes the kingdom.

Todd Burpo (Greg Kinnear) is a church pastor in a small, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Interview: Greg Kinnear is Preaching in ‘Heaven Is for Real’

15 April 2014 8:12 AM, PDT

Chicago – The actor Greg Kinnear has been known for his neat and tidy image, but never has he portrayed a religious leader. His role as Todd Burpo – a pastor of a church and the father whose son believes “Heaven Is for Real” – brings the energy of spirituality to the movies just in time for the Easter holiday.

Born in small town Logansport, Indiana, Greg Kinnear was the son of a career diplomat, and moved around quite a bit as a child, even living overseas. He is a veteran actor who first came into prominence when he hosted the first version of “Talk Soup” on the E! Network in 1991. Four years later, he made a splashy film debut as David Larrabee in the 1995 remake of Billy Wilder’s “Sabrina,” directed by Sydney Pollack.

Greg Kinnear Portrays a Skeptical Pastor in ‘Heaven Is for Real

Photo credit: TriStar Pictures

A couple years later, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


Film Review: Facing Life Transitions in ‘Hide Your Smiling Faces’

14 April 2014 1:08 PM, PDT

Chicago – The pain and passion of prepubescent youth and adolescence unravels in the excellent directorial debut of Daniel Patrick Carbone, “Hide Your Smiling Faces.” Carbone captures the isolation and meticulous boredom at a time of life when everything conspires to happen on a daily basis.

Rating: 4.0/5.0

The film is a meditation, with shades of Terrence Malick-like contemplation. When the suicide of a troubled boy resonates a wave of reaction in a rural town, two brothers look inward to their own fragility. The soul searching and almost beautiful ache of this snapshot is contained within the raw emotions exposed in the boys during their first experience of human mortality. The story is set in a property-less rural region of the country, a place where exploration is wide open, both in territory and soul. The boys are both seekers, and as the reality of death and the bitter sameness of their lives unfolds, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

Permalink | Report a problem


3 articles



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners