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Join Cinema Retro At "The Man Who Would Be King" Staged Radio Play, Metuchen, New Jersey, February 18

3 hours ago

The following is a press release from Raconteur Radio:  

"The Man who would be King!” A Staged Radio Play & Immersive Masonic Experience with themed snacks and drinks is presented by Raconteur Radio and Mt. Zion Lodge #135 of Free and Accepted Masons.

Based on Rudyard Kipling's classic yarn, this rousing radio play tells the tall and timeless tale of two rogue soldiers and Freemasons who set off from 19th century British India in search of adventure and end up as Kings of Kafiristan. It is a time of mission and mystery, of forbidden lands, and of wealth often described as untold. Royal soldiers-cum-con men, Danny and Peachy, climb mountains and cross glaciers to penetrate the forbidden territories where, through luck, battle, and a series of masonic coincidences, they realize their wildest dreams.

Featuring: Jeff Maschi as Brother Daniel Dravot, Carlyle Owens as Brother Peachy Carnehan, and Laurence Mintz as Rudyard Kipling and Billy Fish. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Review: "Kings Of The Sun" (1963) Starring Yul Brynner, George Chakiris And Shirley Anne Field; Blu-ray Release From Kino Lorber

10 hours ago

By Lee Pfeiffer

Kino Lorber has released a Blu-ray edition of the 1963 action adventure film "Kings of the Sun", a movie that has largely faded into relative obscurity. In viewing for the first time since its initial release I was pleasantly surprised at how impressive the film is on any number of levels. For one, it takes place during a period that has been largely untouched by Hollywood in that it is set in the era of the ancient Mayans. One must deal with the fact that the historical aspects of the screenplay are largely hokum. The story opens with the Mayan people mourning the death of its king in battle against a rival tribe led by the blood-thirsty Hunac Ceel (Leo Gordon). The new heir apparent is Balam (George Chakiris), a young man who must instantly assume his father's throne and responsibilities. These include the practice of human sacrifice to appease the gods. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Review: "The Stranger Wore A Gun" (1953) Starring Randolph Scott; DVD Release From Explosive Media

13 February 2016 3:47 AM, PST

By Doug Oswald

Randolph Scott plays a former Confederate spy in the 1953 western “The Stranger Wore a Gun.” When the movie starts, Jeff Travis (Scott) is involved in a brutal murder during the final days of the Civil War while spying for Quantrill' Raiders, a gang of notorious Confederate guerrillas. A wanted man after the war, Travis heads west to Arizona to start a new life. Josie Sullivan (Claire Trevor) helps him escape from a river boat and meets up with him later in Arizona. Travis also meets up with one of his former Quantrill Raider associates, Jules Mourret (George Macready), who offers him a position in his new gang of outlaws so he can continue to steal “Yankee gold.”

Mourret wants Travis to continue his old ways as a spy and pretends to be a detective sent by the stage line to investigate recent gold robberies. Travis meets the »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Review: "Hooper" (1978) Starring Burt Reynolds, Sally Field And Brian Keith; Blu-ray Release

11 February 2016 1:22 PM, PST

By John M. Whalen

Back in 1978, Burt Reynolds was still at the beginning of a cycle of six action comedies that he made with director Hal Needham—a cycle that started with “Smokey and the Bandit “(1977) and ended with “Cannonball Run II” (1984).  One of the best of these films was “Hooper”—a tribute to Hollywood’s unsung hero, the Hollywood stunt man. “Hooper” was a very personal film for both Reynolds and Needham who both started their movie careers as stunt doubles. Needham started doing stunt work in the early years of live TV in New York and is best remembered for his stunt driving in Steve McQueen’s “Bullitt” (1968). Reynolds also began in TV and parlayed his athletic ability along with his good looks to become one of tinseltown’s biggest stars. In a very real way, “Hooper” is even more personal film for Reynolds, because one of the »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Review: "Day 6" (2009) DVD Release From One 7 Movies

10 February 2016 3:23 AM, PST

By Todd Garbarini

Varo Venturi's Day 6 is another genre outing that has made its rounds under different titles: Alien Exorcism (U.S.), Alien Encounter (U.K.), 5 Giorni Sulla Terra (Italy), Eirian-Baasasu-Ekusoshituto (Japan), and 6 Days on Earth. Now out on DVD from One 7 Movies, Day 6 introduces a story that is intriguing but tests the audiences' patience by inundating them with so much information that it becomes a bit much to follow. Although spoken (and apparently also dubbed) in English, there are no subtitles, and their absence is heavily felt. In a nutshell, the film is a fair attempt of mixing aliens with evil spirits. Dr. Davide Piso (Massimo Poggio) is a scientist who has dedicated his life's work to the study of alien abductions. You would think that he would have taken notes from Whitley Strieber's 1987 book on the subject, Communion, as he speaks with and studies people who claim to have been abducted. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Review: "The Graduate" (1967) Starring Anne Bancroft And Dustin Hoffman; Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

8 February 2016 3:34 AM, PST

“Jesus Loves You More Than You Will Know”

By Raymond Benson

Although it has been released before on Blu-ray, the “Criterion treatment” is always welcome for a classic, well-known film such as The Graduate. Quite simply, it’s one of the most beloved pictures of the 60s, one that hit a nerve in the public consciousness. It helped define those wildly changing years at the end of the decade, illustrating how the country’s youth rebelled against an established society that they were expected to join. The Graduate is a landmark of the New Hollywood movement that took over the studios in those years and held reign through the 70s.

Director Mike Nichols, fresh from his success as a debut helmsman for Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), gave us a romantic comedy unlike anything we’d seen previously—mainly because of the radically daring casting of an unknown actor named Dustin Hoffman. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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