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John G. Avildsen, Oscar-winning Director Of "Rocky", Dead At 81

18 June 2017 11:44 AM, PDT

Director John G. Avildsen has passed away from pancreatic cancer. He had an eclectic body of work that began in earnest with his work as a cinematographer on several high profile films of the 1960s including "Hurry Sundown" and "Mickey One". Avildsen graduated to the director's chair with the surprise indie hit "Joe" in 1970 a serio-comic look at an ultra conservative working man (Peter Boyle) whose rage boils over from what he believes are anti-American protest movements against the Vietnam War. Three years later Avildsen directed the acclaimed drama "Save the Tiger" which won Jack Lemmon the Best Actor Oscar. In 1976 he directed the most unlikely of blockbusters, "Rocky", which won the Best Picture Oscar. Avildsen took home the Best Director award. He also scored with the "Karate Kid" franchise and also directed the zany comedy "Neighbors" with John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd as well as "The Formula" with Marlon Brando »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Technicolor Unveils Cutting Edge Vr Tec Center

17 June 2017 8:34 AM, PDT

Tim Sarnoff Technicolor's President of Production, addresses attendees.

By Mark Cerulli

The energy was building, the drones were flying and the mood was celebratory as Technicolor officially opened its brand-new Culver City Tec Center dedicated to the brave new worlds of Vr (virtual reality), Ar (augmented reality) and other immersive media platforms.

The official name is “Technicolor Experience Center”, and it’s been having a “soft” opening for almost a year, but now the doors are really open... The facility is a collaborative lab and incubator to develop future content and delivery platforms in the Immersive media space. “The Tec is really a work in progress,” explains Marcie Jastrow, Technicolor’s Svp Immersive Media and the executive in charge of the Center. “It’s a safe place for people to come and learn. It’s part education, part production and part post-production.” Although Technicolor is the parent company of hot VFX shops The Mill, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Theatre Review:"Zero Hour" Starring Jim Brochu; Theatre At St. Clement's, New York

17 June 2017 7:02 AM, PDT

By Lee Pfeiffer

All things come to those who wait. Having somehow inexcusably missed actor/writerJim Brochu's award-winning play "Zero Hour" that depicts the controversial life and career of Zero Mostel, I was able to see the show's most recent revival at the Theatre at St. Clement's  which is just off Broadway. The show is presented by the Peccadillo Theatre Company, which specializes in staging worthy productions in the prestigious venue that is just off Broadway. For Brochu, the one-man show is a triumph.. He wrote the script himself and the production is directed with flair by three-time Oscar nominee Piper Laurie. Mostel was a larger-than-life talent and he is played with uncanny skill by Brochu, who somehow makes himself into the spitting image of the iconic actor (he doesn't bare the slightest resemblance to Mostel off-stage). The imaginative scenario finds the entire play set in Mostel's New York painting »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Review: "World Without End" (1956) Warner Archive Blu-ray Release

14 June 2017 10:05 AM, PDT

By Hank Reineke

There’s enough cross-plot evidence to suggest that some ideas woven into World Without End (Allied Artists, 1956) were based in part on H.G. Wells’ classic 1895 novel The Time Machine. Wells’ immortal tale would, of course, soon follow the less-celebrated World Without End as a lavish, big-screen Hollywood feature of 1960. Though director-writer Edward Bernds readily admitted to familiarity with Wells’ The Time Machine, he insisted his screenplay was a wholly original creation. Though the similarities between the two works cannot be discounted, Bernds refutation has merit. Certainly modern science-fiction’s fascinations with time and space travel were hardly of the abstract, and most certainly predated Wells’ own literary musings on the subject.

That said, Bernds World Without End is of its own time and primarily a stereotypical 1950s Cold War-era vehicle. It’s a call for a return to reason and détente in the decade following the game-changing horrors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Book Review: "Robert Wise: The Motion Pictures" By Joe Jordan

14 June 2017 6:31 AM, PDT

By Dean Brierly 

For a film director with such an iconic resume, there’s a surprising scarcity of scholarly books devoted to Robert Wise, the man who directed such classics as  "West Side Story" (1961), "The Haunting" (1963), “The Sound of Music” (1965), “The Curse of the Cat People” (1944), “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (1951), “The Sand Pebbles” (1966) and many other critical and commercial successes. To say nothing of his stature as the man who edited “Citizen Kane” (1941) and “The Magnificent Ambersons” (1942) before taking up decades-long residence in the director’s chair.

Wise brought a self-effacing approach to directing, one that never drew attention to itself. He may have had the most “invisible” style of all the major directors from Hollywood’s Golden Era, which no doubt helps explain why he never had the auteur imprimatur conferred upon him by French critics who swooned over Welles’ baroque visuals, Douglas Sirk’s melodramatic excess, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Exclusive! Nancy Sinatra Talks "You Only Live Twice" To Cinema Retro!

12 June 2017 11:37 AM, PDT

You Only Live Twice opened in UK cinemas 50 years ago today (on the 13th in America), and to celebrate the release of the biggest Bond of all Cinema Retro's September issue pays tribute to this cinematic extravaganza with a 32-page 'Film in Focus' special. Apart from Matthew Field and Ajay Chowdhury's interview with Nancy Sinatra (a rare in-print interview about her involvement with the film), we feature many rare and never-seen-before stills and behind-the-scenes photos, features on props and collectibles, and exclusive interviews with Karin Dor, Leslie Bricusse, Julie Rogers (the singer who was originally contracted to record the title song) and Mark Cerulli catches up with Tsai Chin for her memories of the film. And that's not all - Bond composer David Arnold discusses how the music to You Only Live Twice changed his life forever, and we have an exclusive interview with the late Ken Wallis, the »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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