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Top Three: Future Arrests in Development with Louis C.K.’s “I’m a Cop”

9 hours ago

Creator of a show de rigueur, comedian and art-house junkie and lover of films with subtitles Louis C.K. will write, direct and star in an indie budgeted film project. Titled I’m a Cop, his third feature film will be produced by Hollywood titan Scott Rudin, Dave Becky and Blair Breard. While no production start date was mentioned, we’re imagining that the next piece of news will be the casting the mother role. Susan Sarandon would be a great fit.

Gist: A depressed middle-aged man (C.K.) who is a volunteer police officer living in the shadow of his mother, a highly decorated retired officer. When she dies, her continued influence forces him to become a real police officer, which is something he never wanted to be.

Worth Noting: They surely share a strong affinity for the 7th art, C.K. last directed 2001’s Pooty Tang with Chris Rock »

- Eric Lavallee

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2015 Rooftop Films: Crystal Moselle, Sean Baker & Trey Shults Part of 19th Edition

10 hours ago

Think Drive-in sans automobile. Think film festival that isn’t over with the blink of an eye. We’ve mentioned just how important a role it has in supporting works in progress from the participating Ifp’s Independent Filmmaker Lab folks, but it’s also a indie film love-in destination for some of the more innovative items found on the film fest circuit. Brooklynites and visiting cinephiles have several reasons to rejoice as the Rooftop Films folks have unveiled their 2015 Summer Series program and they’ll be serving up a must see plate of indie, docu and shorts.

Among the more tantalizing offerings, Sundance is well repped with Tangerine, The Wolfpack and Finders Keepers and SXSW menu offerings are found in Trey ShultsKrisha award-winner and in Bob Byington’s 7 Chinese Brothers, which technically opens the 19th edition on May 30th. Here is the list of feature film offerings (dates »

- Eric Lavallee

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The Fox Trot: Laura Dern & Ellen Burstyn Spin “The Tale”

10 hours ago

We imagine that for plenty of docu-helmers (take the tumultuous past couple of years in that Laura Poitras had to undergo) that sometimes life is indeed truer than fiction. A documentarian who has made several trips to Sundance (Beirut: The Last Home Movie, An American Love Story and Flying: Confessions of a Free Woman) is now turning the lenses on her own experience….one that digs into childhood and adulthood. Screen reports that will direct Laura Dern, Ellen Burstyn, Sebastien Koch (The Danish Girl) and Elizabeth Debicki (Kurzel’s Macbeth) in an investigative thriller called The Tale. Principal photography is set for this summer, with the multi-talented Oren Moverman producing alongside Lawrence Inglee and Fox. Marc Almon and Sol Bondy serve as co-producers.

Gist: Based on an episode from her own life, Jennifer (Dern?), a globetrotting journalist living in New York whose mother finds a story she wrote aged 13 describing »

- Eric Lavallee

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Oslo Accords: Rory Culkin & Caleb Landry Jones Join Jonas Åkerlund’s “Lords Of Chaos”

4 May 2015 2:15 PM, PDT

Indie actor Rory Culkin (Electrick Children, Gabriel) and Caleb Landry Jones (who’ll see Heaven Knows What receive its theatrical release at the end of the month and Gerardo Naranjo’s upcoming Viena and the Fantomes) are set to star in accomplished music video director Jonas Åkerlund’s fourth outing as a feature filmmaker. Variety reports that Lords Of Chaos is set to shoot in Norway during the fall with an impressive collection of producers onboard in Scott Free London, Rsa London and the ever expanding Vice universe. Producing are Jack Arbuthnott, Kai-Lu Hsiung, Ko Mori, Fredrik Zander and Malte Forsell, and executive produced by Shane Smith, Eddy Moretti, Danny Gabai and Vince Landay for Vice, and Carlo Dusi for Scott Free London.

Gist: Co-written with Dennis Magnusson, based on real events, this charts a dream-turned-nightmare scenario for a group of teenagers who spiral out of control. 17-year-old Euronymous is »

- Eric Lavallee

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Check Out Those Cannes: Oscilloscope Claim “The Wonders” & “Catch Me Daddy”

4 May 2015 12:30 PM, PDT

Oscilloscope Laboratories have made a pre-Cannes double deal. Slightly misleading, they’ve actually picked up a pair that had not yet to be picked up since they had their premieres at the 2014 edition of the festival. O-scope have landed Alice Rohrwacher’s Grand Prix winning (2nd place award after the Palme d’Or) The Wonders which was high up on several Best undistributed films of ’14, while Daniel Wolfe’s directorial debut Catch Me Daddy was a Directors’ Fortnight entry that had it’s supporters. O-Scope will release both films later this year. Additionally, they’ve landed one of the better undiscoverd gems from the Toronto Int. Film Fest last fall in Javier Fuentes-León‘s The Vanished Elephant.

Gist: Rohrwacher’s sophomore film is set at the end of summer and follows Gelsomina and her three younger sisters. She is the designated heir of the strange, secluded kingdom that her »

- Eric Lavallee

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Saint Laurent | Review

4 May 2015 10:00 AM, PDT

Once again, Make it the Same Only New

With this biopic on the great French fashion icon Yves Saint Laurent, Bertrand Bonello streamlines for himself a reputation as one of contemporary cinema’s keenest voices on the concept of time. Coming off his Palme d’Or-contending masterpiece, House of Tolerance – a film concerned with the dichotomy between slow and rapid evolutions of people, places, and culture – Bonello once again sweeps across years of a life in a startlingly arrhythmic procession. The central theme in this case is re-materialization, namely, Saint Laurent’s propensity for reinvigorating the status quo by injecting it with the new. Unfortunately, one of the prime examples in Saint Laurent’s life of this trait was in his reliance on various mind-altering drugs – a chapter of his life that consumes and befouls roughly a full hour of the lengthy, two-and-a-half hour dalliance.

Chalk that up to the »

- Blake Williams

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Preggoland | Review

4 May 2015 9:00 AM, PDT

Maternity Syndrome: Tierney’s Undefined Comedy Explores Notions of Motherhood

What begins as a concept full of pleasurably subversive possibilities quickly turns into yet another diluted tale of female arrested development in Preggoland, revolving around an emotionally stunted woman who learns an important lesson in the nick of time, thereby exponentially enhancing her own life experience and those in her orbit. Though it’s not as obnoxiously adolescent as its Diablo Cody inspired title suggests, actress turned screenwriter Sonja Bennett’s screenplay fails to use the concept to explore the actual issues underlying her character’s inability to successfully complete the normal trajectory of her sanctioned heteronormative peer group. And so, Jacob Tiernay‘s fourth feature film becomes another one of those wanly charming comedies about how to curb one’s drifting, wayward attitude in order to gain re-admittance into the fold.

After causing a disastrous, drunken scene at her »

- Nicholas Bell

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I Am Big Bird: The Caroll Spinney Story | Review

4 May 2015 8:00 AM, PDT

8 Feet Tall and Light as a Feather: Walker and Lamattina Chronicle the Life and Love of a Puppeteering Legend

You’d be hard pressed to find someone who doesn’t know Big Bird. Of the many beloved creatures that sprang from the genius of Jim Henson, Sesame Street’s Big Bird may well be the most universally recognizable. Bearing the spirit of a child within the body of an 8-foot canary yellow behemoth, Big Bird became a larger than life icon of children’s television. Yet, despite Caroll Spinney’s famed collaborators and lengthy list of accolades that include Emmys, Grammys, and even a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, you may not recognize the lanky, mop-headed man who has brought the bird, as well as Oscar the Grouch, to life for the last 45 years. Following the success of Constance Marks’s Kevin Clash bio-doc Being Elmo, directors Chad Walker »

- Jordan M. Smith

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The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared | Review

4 May 2015 7:00 AM, PDT

Shot in the Dark: Herngren’s Tiring Road Comedy Overplays Gimmick

Before you can even wrap your mind around its cumbersome title, you’ll be immediately comparing The 100-Year-Old Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared to the structure of the famed American title it clearly resembles, Forrest Gump. Certainly less schmaltzy and more acerbic than that film, the concept wears thin rather quickly as we struggle through a stilted present day scenario considerably padded with useless flashbacks that extend the running time to a screeching two hours of comic buffoonery apparently going on behind major world events.

On the eve of his one hundredth birthday, spry elder Allan Karlsson (Robert Gustafsson) bails out of his ground level window and takes off into the Swedish countryside. A mix-up at the train station finds him in possession of a large suitcase of money, whose owner, an angry skinhead, alerts his cohorts of the mishap. »

- Nicholas Bell

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