Week of   « Prev | Next »

1-20 of 50 items   « Prev | Next »


A Man Travels to America to Become the World’s Fattest in This Sharp Short Film

29 August 2014 1:00 PM, PDT

Why Watch? When you’re a fat fish in a small pond, the allure of swimming across the ocean to test yourself against greater challenges is often incredibly strong. Things are more difficult when your pond only has seven hot dogs in it, though. In this short film from Adam Taylor, the largest man in an Eastern European village goes after his dream to prove himself as the largest man in the world. He’s dedicated, in love and probably weighs about 180 pounds. On one level, Gros feels like a sweeter version of Borat. More innocently naive. Our normal-sized fat guy doesn’t shake hands with the Statue of Liberty to satirize, but to find a broader sense of humor. Some surprising images and bone dry witticisms make it all possible, and the art school style offers a calm base for the bombastic to stand out. At the same time, he »

- Scott Beggs

Permalink | Report a problem


Why ‘Rear Window’ is Still Relevant Today

29 August 2014 11:00 AM, PDT

Some movies, no matter how old they are, never age a day. Their situations and themes remain as relevant now as when they were first released. Watching them today, they reflect and comment on our present in ways they couldn’t possibly have anticipated. Every month we’re going to pick a movie from the past that does just that, and explore what it has to say about the here and now. For sixty years Alfred Hitchcock’s Rear Window has remained a classic not just because it’s a perfectly crafted thriller, but because it’s one of cinema’s greatest commentaries on our voyeuristic impulses. Those impulses haven’t gone away, which is why it’s not surprising that Rear Window continues to be a potent reflection of society—all the more so since technology has further enabled us to peer in on each other’s lives. Here then are five ways—not all of »

- Alexander Huls

Permalink | Report a problem


What a “No Jokes” DC Comics Movie Universe Would Look Like

29 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT

You may have heard that Warner Bros. has introduced a new policy to their future DC Comics universe, summed up in two simple words (that, we assumed, were delivered while yelling and slamming one’s hand on a table): “No Jokes.” That’s what Drew McWeeny says, over at Hitfix. Warner and DC are looking at the success of stuff like The Dark Knight and Man of Steel, and the abysmal failure of Ryan Reynolds’ goofy Green Lantern, and making an executive decision. Two rights + one wrong = stop that laughing. From now on, all future DC Comics movies will be grim and dark and gritty and gritty and serious and dark: watching any future DC film will be like chewing a mouthful of gravel while your dad says you were an accident that he never loved. You may have then heard a few other sources call foul on this report. Forbes »

- Adam Bellotto

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Rhymes for Young Ghouls’ Exclusive Trailer: Learn Devery Jacobs’ Name Right Now

29 August 2014 9:00 AM, PDT

It’s easy enough to pinpoint when Jennifer Lawrence broke out. Long before American Hustle or the X-Men films or even the Hunger Games series, there was Winter’s Bone. At some point in January of 2010, Lawrence became a bonafide star — or, at least, a star-in-the-making, one to watch — thanks to Debra Granik’s acute study of the kind of hard knock life that few people ever even have a basic awareness of. Lawrence was eventually nominated for an Oscar for her part in the film — her first — and the film picked up nods for Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actor (the phenomenal John Hawkes). It was a small-scale indie juggernaut, and it made it clear that Lawrence was someone to watch. We suspect something similar is about to happen to Devery Jacobs after her turn in Jeff Barnaby‘s Rhymes for Young Ghouls. Did you miss the Lawrence bust-out? Don »

- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


8 Limited Releases That Kicked (Modest) Box Office Ass This Summer

29 August 2014 8:00 AM, PDT

Superheroes rule the box office and the Guardians of the Galaxy have brought us the biggest film of the summer (which is about to dethrone Captain America to become the biggest film of the year). But talking about these big-budget behemoths with gigantic box office rewards (unless you’re the latest installment of the Expendables or Sin City brand) means talking about the same thing over and over again – a happy hour of strange creatures, diversified only by a couple comedies. Fortunately there’s a great mix of summer fare that kicked absolute ass on a very modest per-screen basis. One can’t exactly expect that a limited release in select big cities would fare as well if it expanded to thousands of theaters across the nation (averages generally shrink when/if they do), but it’s still great to see the “little guy” head into a release in a handful of theaters and earn a better »

- Monika Bartyzel

Permalink | Report a problem


‘As Above/So Below’ Review: They Went Down Together

29 August 2014 7:00 AM, PDT

Scarlett Marlowe (Perdita Weeks) is an archaeologist on a dual-purposed mission. She’s searching for the long-fabled Philosopher’s Stone, an archaic relic capable of transmuting metals into gold and granting immortality, but she’s also hoping to prove her father’s theories right in order to clear his name tarnished by a descent into supposed madness that ended in suicide. A breakthrough discovery in Iran leads her to Paris where she comes to believe the stone is buried somewhere in or beneath the city’s legendary catacombs. She’s joined by a documentary filmmaker, a wandering clock mechanic who reads Aramaic and a trio of local urban spelunkers, and together they descend into the world’s largest cemetery. They face the expected difficulties at first including tight spaces, rats and a creepy coven of topless hippies, but as they move deeper into the earth the obstacles become far more dangerous and mysterious. Shadowy »

- Rob Hunter

Permalink | Report a problem


Broken Projector: How To Write a Screenplay in Six Weeks

29 August 2014 6:00 AM, PDT

There’s only one, iron-clad, sure-fire, can’t-miss, hyphen-toting method to finishing a screenplay in only six weeks. Fortunately, we know the secret and are willing to share it with you (for less than $600). The trick is, in order for it to work, you have to follow the 1,008-step process exactly. If you think you’re up for the challenge, listen to the episode. We’ll also need all of your credit card information, your blood type and what you’d do for a Klondike Bar. Beyond sharing the trick to writing a script in a month and a half, we’ll answer a few screenwriting questions about the nature of negotiating a script fee and laugh about the supposed ban on jokes that Warners has set up for its superhero movies. You should follow the show (@brokenprojector), Geoff (@drgmlatulippe) and Scott (@scottmbeggs) on Twitter for more on a daily basis. Please »

- Scott Beggs

Permalink | Report a problem


Meet the 2014 Honorary Oscar Winners: Miyazaki, O’Hara, Carriere and Belafonte

28 August 2014 2:00 PM, PDT

Proving the Honorary Oscars are not simply lifetime achievement awards given as a consolation prize, two of this year’s four Governors Award recipients are already Academy Award winners. And of those two, there are seven nominations among them. Japanese animation legend Hayao Miyazaki was recognized in the Best Animated Feature category in 2003 for Spirited Away, in 2006 for Howl’s Moving Castle and in 2014 for The Wind Rises. He won the first of those. French screenwriter Jean-Claude Carriere was nominated in 1973 and 1978 for collaborating with Luis Bunuel on scripts for The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (original) and That Obscure Object of Desire (adapted), then in 1989 for working with director Philip Kaufman on the adaptation of The Unbearable Lightness of Being. His first nomination and win came in 1963 for writing and directing the short film Happy Anniversary with Pierre Etaix. As for the other two honorees who’ll receive their statuettes in a special ceremony on November »

- Christopher Campbell

Permalink | Report a problem


A Short Film About Bruce Wayne’s Favorite Superhero Channels ‘Batman: The Animated Series’

28 August 2014 1:00 PM, PDT

Why Watch? Batman has probably inspired more fan films than any other character, but I appreciate this short film from J.L. Topkis and Matt Landsman because it moves beyond the typical cosplay action sequence by channeling a Batman television show that channeled the Batman serials. They take their inspiration from a 1992 episode of Batman: The Animated Series (aka the best Batman TV show ever) where young Bruce Wayne is shown watching a show called The Gray Ghost and, in the present-day as Batman, has to find a copy of the show in order to solve a copycat crime. As a bonus, Adam West voices the actor who plays the Gray Ghost in the Animated Series episode. Here, Topkis and Landsman have imagined the show within a show as a real adventure series, crafting a live-action hero who leaps into young Bruce Wayne’s life at exactly the right moment (with some Sin City-style CGI to help »

- Scott Beggs

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Young Ones’ Trailer: Michael Shannon Is Really Thirsty

28 August 2014 12:00 PM, PDT

There wasn’t much hype surrounding Young Ones at Sundance. It was a movie on people’s radar, but after it screened, it didn’t generate much buzz. That’s a shame, because Jake Paltrow‘s second directorial effort is an excellent film. It’s a western with a twist of science-fiction. The sci-fi elements are mostly left in the background, though. Young Ones is a movie that could mostly do without all the futuristic machinery, it’s just an immensely cool cherry on the top. That CGI tech, by the way, is seamlessly rendered into these beautiful desert landscapes. They have a worn down, used quality that suits this old-fashioned story. Young Ones is about a family. At the beginning we see a father, played with charm and warmth by Michael Shannon, protecting his land from thieves. They’re there to steal his water supply. In this future — what year isn’t stated and doesn’t »

- Jack Giroux

Permalink | Report a problem


Gabba Gabba Hey! Martin Scorsese Is Directing a Ramones Biopic

28 August 2014 12:00 PM, PDT

There’s no doubt that Martin Scorsese knows exactly what he’s doing when it comes to crafting thorough, smart and loving projects centering on the careers of beloved musical acts. He’s basically the unofficial godfather to the Rolling Stones, using their music in a number of his films and directing their fantastic concert doc Shine a Light. He has The Last Waltz, a doc chronicling The Band’s legendary 1976 farewell concert under his belt, as well as the Bob Dylan film No Direction Home, and a long-gestating project called Sinatra still in the works. What he hasn’t touched yet is punk, but he’s going back to the source by reportedly making a biopic about the Ramones, the seminal New York act that inspired a generation of leather jackets in 80-degree weather, ripped jeans, scowling faces and songs around two minutes in length (if we’re being very generous). Buried in a Billboard article »

- Samantha Wilson

Permalink | Report a problem


I Have Never Seen ‘Ferris Bueller’s Day Off’

28 August 2014 11:00 AM, PDT

Ashe never got to see a ton of modern classics from his youth, so we’re making him watch them all as a nostalgia-less adult. Check out the inaugural article for more info. It’s almost like it was fate. I got sick (for real) and had to take off work on the day that I watched Ferris Bueller’s Day Off for the very first time. I wasn’t kidney transplant sick, just obnoxious sinus infection/cold sick. So I could empathize with both Ferris’s attempts to “prove” his illness (mine includes a pretty hard to fake hacking cough) and Cameron’s actual illness. Until it disappears, I guess. Was he even sick or just that much of a sad sack? I still don’t know. That’s actually a good place to pick up: One of my few complaints of the film is, uh, I’m super worried about Cameron, and »

- Ashe Cantrell

Permalink | Report a problem


44 Things We Learned from the Out-of-Print ‘Fisher King’ Commentary

28 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT

Back in the 1990s, Terry Gilliam provided a commentary track for The Fisher King, which has since gone out of print. Now, thanks to the magic of YouTube and MP3s and internet tubes, it’s possible to listen to this commentary track even if the disc itself is hard to come by. Not only does this commentary give an intimate look into one of Gilliam’s best, it also lives on in cyberspace to allow film nerds like us to learn more about the production. Due to differences in running time, you can’t simply synch all versions of the video with Gilliam’s commentary. For example, the Netflix version of The Fisher King runs 131 minutes instead of the unaltered 137-minute disc and theatrical presentation. Still, with the background soundtrack intact, you have a pretty good idea of where he is in his own timeline. The Fisher King (1991) Commentator: Terry Gilliam (director) 1. Gilliam had three rules »

- Kevin Carr

Permalink | Report a problem


Pixar’s Newest Heroine Looks Just Like a Regular Kid (And That’s a Good Thing)

28 August 2014 9:00 AM, PDT

Before we even laid eyes on Riley, the eleven-year-old animated star of Pixar’s Inside Out, we knew that she would be like us. At least, we knew that she would be more like us than some of the other stars of Pixar’s most beloved features, which tend to run towards the make-believe (monsters, talking toys), the fantastic (superheroes, talented vermin) and the slightly terrifying (cars). Pixar’s films aren’t typically concerned with stories centered on actual humans, even as they are packed with human emotions and experiences using charming surrogates (bugs, robots, fish), and the concept of Inside Out – a film that is entirely about the human condition, literally from the inside out — was a big, welcome change. The creative decision to cast a tween girl — a regular tween girl — as the star was also a major step forward for the animation house. Pixar films may not ascribe to the same “Princess” mentality of »

- Kate Erbland

Permalink | Report a problem


A Helpful Guide to How ‘The Simpsons’ Movie Parodies Have Changed Over 25 Years

28 August 2014 8:00 AM, PDT

There’s another five days left in Fxx’s great rerunning of every episode of The Simpsons in recorded history. Now, we don’t want to distract you — there’s still at least 100 hours to go, and shifting your eyes away from the TV for any reason could ruin that perfect butt-shaped indent that’s this close to being a permanent part of the couch — but just in case you need a break (a break that still involves The Simpsons, of course, we’re not monsters), here’s a momentary distraction. We all know the myriad of reasons why The Simpsons remains so popular. Revolutionize this, landmark that, longest-running yadda yadda yadda and so forth. But an exemplary trait of The Simpsons that tends to get short shrift (or shorter shrift, anyway), is its relationship with cinema. The Simpsons overflows with a love for film. Little homages to the classics. Grand »

- Adam Bellotto

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Congress’ Review: Eye-Popping Animation and a Crazy Heart

28 August 2014 7:15 AM, PDT

When it comes to independent films and major releases, animation is fairly underutilized medium. There are exceptions, but for the most part, it’s generally used for kid-centric stories or to paint a lush, if slightly more adult, world. That’s why movies like A Scanner Darkly and The Congress are so special. They use animation for drama and to express ideas that go beyond a few pretty shots. Both films shouldn’t be compared past that point, but they are both emotional, visual, and mental exercises — rides that you either go along with from the start or don’t. If director Ari Folman‘s The Congress grabs you from its first frame, then expect a rich science-fiction film packed with commentary, ideas, laughs, tears, and beauty.  Speaking of beauty, Robin Wright (played conveniently by Robin Wright) has lost it, at least according to some slimy agist studio executive we meet working at Miramount. She »

- Jack Giroux

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Life of Crime’ Review: We’ve Seen These Ruthless People Before

28 August 2014 7:00 AM, PDT

Ordell (Mos Def) and Louis (John Hawkes) have planned the perfect kidnapping. Their target is Mickey (Jennifer Aniston), wife to a sketchy businessman named Frank (Tim Robbins) who’s hiding a fortune in a secret bank account. The plan is simple. Kidnap Mickey, tell Frank to pay the ransom if he ever wants to see his wife again and then retire in style. But they never considered the possibility that Frank might not want his wife back. Chronology is a funny thing. The inclination will be (and has been if you check the IMDb page) to label Life of Crime a straight-up rip-off of 1986′s Ruthless People. In actuality though this is an adaptation of Elmore Leonard‘s 1978 novel, The Switch. Keep moving backward and you’ll find that all of these incarnations share an inspiration in O. Henry’s 1907 short story, “The Ransom of Red Chief.” The problem for this film then is how to stand »

- Rob Hunter

Permalink | Report a problem


Required Reading: Distracting Movie Extras and Pop Culture Sins

28 August 2014 6:00 AM, PDT

The best movie culture writing from around the internet-o-sphere. There will be a quiz later. Just leave a tab open for us, will ya? “Will We Ever Forgive George Lucas?” — Rob Bricken at io9 opens up the mail bag and answers an excellent assortment of queries. At the top of the pile, a smart take on what the new Star Wars movies would have to be like in order for the hissing crowds to crawl back to Lucas. “7 Deadly Sins Of Talking About Pop Culture” — Also at io9, Charlie Jane Anders beats down a list of no-nos. Beyond non-consensual spoilers, there’s a few great reminders here, but every single person needs to read #7 and repeat it as a mantra. “How Getting Wild Saved a ‘Lost’ Reese Witherspoon” — Kyle Buchanan at Vulture interviews the actress on the kind of role we don’t normally get to see her in. “You have to understand, for »

- Scott Beggs

Permalink | Report a problem


Fantastic Fest 2014 Announces a 2nd Wave of Must-See Titles and Intriguing Unknowns

27 August 2014 4:35 PM, PDT

Fantastic Fest may be a festival focused on off-the-radar genre films from here and abroad, but that doesn’t mean there’s no room for recognizable Hollywood faces. They’ve just announced their second wave of titles playing this year, and while it’s heavy on unfamiliar foreign titles there are a few heavy hitters in there too. One of last year’s highlights was the presence of Keanu Reeves who there with his directorial debut, the surprisingly fun Man of Tai Chi, but also took time out to participate in the Fantastic Debates. He’s returning again this year, and while he didn’t direct John Wick it promises to be a rollicking action flick all the same thanks to Reeves’ clear love of the genre and the co-directors vast experience in the stunt game. Jake Gyllenhaal won’t be making an appearance, but his fantastically dark-looking new film, Nightcrawler »

- Rob Hunter

Permalink | Report a problem


James Ellroy is Writing a ‘Laura’ Remake, Which Would Be Terrific if It Wasn’t a Herald of the Apocalypse

27 August 2014 3:18 PM, PDT

Here’s a remake idea that won’t have you doing a spit-take and attempting to burn Hollywood down to its sinful ashes: Otto Preminger‘s Laura. Yes, the film is an unabashed classic, one of those films noir that’s been vaulted up to mythical, God-like status amongst those who still watch movies from before 1970. The 1944 film follows a detective, Mark McPherson (Dana Andrews), investigating the murder of the rich, gorgeous and all-around enchanting Laura Hunt (Gene Tierney), who was blown away by an unfortunate shotgun blast to the face. Our dashing detective sinks himself into the case, but as he does he starts to fall madly in love with the deceased dame. Which would be fine (who among us hasn’t developed a little crush on a murder victim now and then?), except the case starts to turn in a seriously weird direction, leaving McPherson the only one to sort out its loop-de-looping plot twists »

- Adam Bellotto

Permalink | Report a problem


1-20 of 50 items   « Prev | Next »



IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners