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'Angry Birds Movie' Sequel Set for 2019 Release

1 hour ago

Sony is set for a second Angry Birds Movie.

Columbia Pictures and Rovio Entertainment announced that a sequel to last year's animated film will hit theaters on Sept. 20, 2019, a release date coinciding with the tenth anniversary of the original mobile gaming app. It will open ahead of Universal's animated adventure Everest and a Warner Bros. event film, both of which debut the following week.

Thurop Van Orman will make his feature directorial debut with the followup,  as the flightless birds and scheming green piggies take their beef to the next level. John Rice, who served as lead storyboard artist on The Angry Birds »


- Ashley Lee

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'War Machine': Film Review

2 hours ago

The latest addition to the gallery of darkly comic films designed to make the case for the absurdity of war, War Machine has trouble maintaining a steady tone, but its climactic, sobering assault ultimately hits the target. In his desire to simultaneously portray and mock the authority figures in charge of the American war effort in Afghanistan (now the longest armed conflict in American history), writer-director David Michod is clearly trying to channel the Stanley Kubrick of Dr. Strangelove, as well as other satiric works like M*A*S*H, Catch-22, Slaughterhouse-Five, Three Kings and Wag the Dog. Despite its troublesomely »


- Todd McCarthy

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Mark Hamill Sure Gets His Name Misspelled Often

3 hours ago

Poor Mark Hamil. Oops, Mark Hamill.

The Star Wars icon known the world over as Luke Skywalker seems to have a heck of a time when it comes to his name being spelled right. 

And it is not like children are misspelling it. Hamill has shared multiple instances over the months and years of his name being misspelled during TV interviews, on promotional material and, yes, even Disney is guilty.

In fact, over the weekend, Hamill shared with his more than 1.8 million followers a couple more examples of name errors, all of which he laughs off, often posting joke »


- Ryan Parker

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'A Violent Life' ('Une vie violente'): Film Review | Cannes 2017

3 hours ago

For his second feature, Corsican-born French filmmaker Thierry de Peretti (Apaches) chose to focus on the violent nationalist struggle that wracked his native island throughout the 1990s. It’s an ambitious project that, in its best moments, sits somewhere between Gomorra and The Godfather, following one young man’s rise – and inevitable fall – within the factional wars that took place between rival militant groups, resulting in dozens of deaths and a major police crackdown.

But despite a worthy cause – Corsica’s tumultuous past has rarely been depicted on screen – and a few standout moments, A Violent Life (Une vie »


- Jordan Mintzer

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'The Workshop' ('L'Atelier'): Film Review | Cannes 2017

3 hours ago

French writer-director Laurent Cantet is perhaps best known for his 2008 Palme d’Or-winning docudrama The Class, but some of his earlier films – especially the haunting unemployment saga Time Out and the taut workplace drama Human Resources – reveal a predilection for dark, character-based thrillers where the line between reality, fiction and a certain kind of madness is not always easy to discern.

These elements are all bound together in his latest feature, The Workshop (L’Atelier), an intense yet true-to-life story about an accomplished writer’s relationship with a student who troubles her as much as he leaves her constantly intrigued. Featuring »


- Jordan Mintzer

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'The Rider': Film Review | Cannes 2017

3 hours ago

The Rider is a rare gem, a small, acutely observed portrait of a few lives on what used to be the frontier but is now a desolate backwater, the windswept badlands around Pine Ridge, South Dakota. Focusing on a young cowboy whose promising future as a top rodeo rider is suddenly jeopardized by a dreadful head injury, this spare and intimate second feature by Chloe Zhao beautifully captures the way a handful of people stoically deal with the meager hands life has dealt them. Commercial prospects are naturally quite modest, but the film will definitely gather a robust core of »


- Todd McCarthy

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What Hollywood Gets Wrong About Military Stories (Guest Column)

3 hours ago

In honor of National Military Appreciation Month in May, I decided to re-watch William Wyler’s 1946 film The Best Years of Our Lives, which follows three WWII servicemen facing the challenges of transitioning to civilian life. The film won seven Academy Awards, including best picture, and proves that a well-told, honest and authentic story is still the most powerful way to instill empathy and provide some understanding of even the most complex emotions and human experiences.

While our military is still a quintessential part of American culture, today’s Hollywood rarely gets it right, often resorting to stereotypes and common tropes to portray »


- David Gale

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'Before We Vanish': Film Review | Cannes 2017

3 hours ago

A sleepy Japanese coastal town becomes the unlikely Ground Zero for a hostile alien invasion of Earth in director Kiyoshi Kurosawa's latest Cannes film festival contender, Before We Vanish. The prolific Kurosawa (Tokyo Sonata, Journey to the Shore) cites John Carpenter and vintage Cold War sci-fi allegories as key influences on his latest genre-blurring comic thriller, but there are other echoes here, too, from Simon Pegg's and Edgar Wright's affectionate fanboy parodies to Lorene Scafaria's 2012 rom-com Seeking a Friend for the End of the World.

Before We Vanish is a largely faithful adaptation of a stage play by Tomohiro »


- Stephen Dalton

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Hot Summer Books: Kevin Hart's Memoir, a Discovered Michael Crichton Novel and 8 More Must-Reads

4 hours ago

Are You Anybody? by Jeffrey Tambor

(Crown, May 16, 304 pages, $27)

Logline The actor chronicles his memorable career, from playing second banana on The Larry Sanders Show to winning two Emmys, a Golden Globe and a SAG award as lead of the groundbreaking Transparent, as well as his childhood as a self-described "fat kid with a lisp."

Buzz Few have enjoyed both the longevity (200-plus credits over 40 years) and the late-career renaissance of Tambor; this is bound to be full of juicy anecdotes and pearls of wisdom.

Dragon Teeth by Michael Crichton

(Harper, May 23, »


- Andy Lewis

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'The Killing of a Sacred Deer': Film Review | Cannes 2017

4 hours ago

The rich vein of unsettling darkness and psychological unease that ripples like a treacherous underground stream beneath the absurdist humor of Yorgos Lanthimos' work becomes a brooding requiem of domestic horror in his masterfully realized fifth feature, The Killing of a Sacred Deer. Reaching back to classical Greek tragedy for inspiration, this hypnotic tale of guilt and retribution provides an even more riveting role for Colin Farrell after his collaboration on the director's English-language debut, The Lobster. He's flanked by a never-better Nicole Kidman and a performance of chilling effectiveness from emerging Irish talent Barry Keoghan in a thriller that »


- David Rooney

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Summer Box-Office Blues: Revenue Down 10 Percent So Far From 2016

4 hours ago

Director James Gunn's Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 — with its gaggle of quirky superheroes — is the only summer 2017 tentpole to live up to the hype so far. Over the weekend, the Disney and Marvel superhero sequel grossed $35.1 million in its third outing, not that far behind the disappointing debut of Ridley Scott's Alien: Covenant.

Launching to a lackluster $36 million domestically, Alien: Covenant is the second big-budget movie in a row to disappoint after King Arthur: The Legend of the Sword, helping to contribute to an early summer revenue box-office decline of 10 percent »


- Pamela McClintock

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'Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales': Film Review

4 hours ago

Looking quickly at the prospectus for Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, in which the son of the series' Orlando Bloom and Keira Knightley characters joins forces with a mysterious orphan to master the sea's arcane mysteries and do what his forebearers could not, you might well label it Pirates: The Next Generation. But unlike the Star Trek franchise-extender, this one is nowhere near bold enough to think it can dispense with its aging protagonist: Johnny Depp's cartoonishly louche Keith Richards-meets-Hunter Thompson pirate Jack Sparrow, the globally recognized caricature who by now feels (appropriately) more like a »


- John DeFore

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'Awards Chatter' Podcast — Andrea Martin ('Great News' & 'Difficult People')

5 hours ago

"I'm so happy, in the last few years of my life, that I've allowed myself to take challenges that I might not have — not 'might not have,' definitely didn't — when I was younger," says actress/comedienne Andrea Martin as we sit down at New York's Empire Hotel to record an episode of The Hollywood Reporter's 'Awards Chatter' podcast. The 70-year-old, who has two Emmys and two Tonys to her name and recently was hailed by New York magazine as the "funniest woman alive," is working as hard as ever these days, playing key supporting roles in two acclaimed TV »


- Scott Feinberg

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'Oh Lucy!': Film Review | Cannes 2017

6 hours ago

Japanese filmmaker Atsuko Hirayanagi's engaging 22-minute Mfa thesis short Oh Lucy! blazed a trail through prominent festivals in 2014 — Cannes, Sundance, Toronto and SXSW among them — collecting admirers and accolades at every stop. Expanding the slender piece to feature length tests the durability of this melancholy comedy, which struggles to balance its absurdist strains with a probing character study of an emotionally unfulfilled middle-aged woman tentatively emerging from her shell. But while it's uneven, and at times seems almost artless in its craft, the story has an idiosyncratic charm that pays off in an unexpectedly touching ending.

Premiering »


- David Rooney

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'David Stratton: A Cinematic Life' : Film Review | Cannes 2017

8 hours ago

A galaxy of Australian screen legends including Nicole Kidman, Russell Crowe, Geoffrey Rush and Toni Colette line up to pay homage to an elder statesman of film criticism in director Sally Aitken's unashamedly partial but agreeably warm-hearted documentary. Screening in the Cannes Classics section, which this year is dedicated to the history of film itself, A Cinematic Life centers on 77-year-old David Stratton, a kind of Roger Ebert figure on the Australian cultural landscape.

Born in Britain, but resident in Australia for over half a century, Stratton has spent most of his career nurturing and championing the domestic cinema industry »


- Stephen Dalton

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How Female Filmmakers Are Transforming Indian Cinema

11 hours ago

As women directors and executives in Hollywood continue the fight for fair representation in the film business, female filmmakers a world away in India are waging a similar campaign in the face of their own country’s deeply entrenched patriarchy.

Across the wildly diverse landscape of Indian cinema — spanning countless genres and nearly a dozen languages — women filmmakers are challenging the status quo, be it at the art house, regional cinema or from within mainstream Bollywood.

Indian filmmaking history, of course, has numerous examples of standout female directors, such as veterans Aparna Sen (1981’s 36 Chowringhee Lane) and Sai »


- Nyay Bhushan

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Justin Timberlake as Neil Bogart? 5 Hot Cannes Projects (That Went Absolutely Nowhere)

11 hours ago

Lights, cameras, attention! With approximately 90 percent of the world’s media decamping on a relatively small stretch of coastline for a week in May, there’s good reason why the Cannes Film Festival has become a popular spot to make a flashy film announcement. But as anyone who has been to a few press conferences and launch parties will know, not everything that is given a star-fuelled promotional giddy-up on the Croisette is an automatic dead cert (many are anything but). Some projects fizzle and die over the coming years, left to forever roam in "development" limbo land, while others spectacularly »

- Alex Ritman

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Cannes: Hp Unveils First Feature 'Manto'

12 hours ago

Hp is getting into the content business with Manto, a theatrical feature that marks the first time it has taken a producing role on a film. First-look footage from the film will be shown to prospective buyers today.

Manto is an biographical film, set in India during the 1940s, that tells the true story of famed writer Saadat Hasan Manto. The film is directed by Nandita Das and stars Nawazuddin Siddiqui as Manto.

Hp Studios is co-producing with Viacom 18 and Sameer Dixit of Movie Makers; plans are to release the film, which is seeking distributors in Cannes, both in Hindi »


- Carolyn Giardina

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Spike Lee on Dwayne Johnson for President, 'Do the Right Thing' Legacy and Netflix Backlash in France

12 hours ago

It was 28 years ago that Spike Lee brought his trailblazing film Do the Right Thing to Cannes, marking one of the most controversial debuts in the festival’s 70 years (then-New York Magazine critic David Denby was among those suggesting it would spark race riots). The film ultimately lost out on the Palme d’Or to Steven Soderbergh’s Sex, Lies, and Videotape. Adding fuel to the debate, jury president Wim Wenders explained his vote by calling Do the Right Thing’s protagonist Mookie “unheroic,” prompting Lee to declare that he had a Louisville Slugger with Wender’s name on it.

Lee is back in »


- Tatiana Siegel

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Cannes: Dean Devlin's 'Bad Samaritan' Sells Wide (Exclusive)

12 hours ago

Dean Devlin's latest directorial effort, Bad Samaritan, starring David Tennant and Robert Sheehan, has sold in a slew of territories at the Cannes market.

New buyers include Dutch Filmworks, which will do a wide theatrical release in the Netherlands and all Dutch-speaking territories. Wise & Wide bought all rights for Korea, Tanweer bought multiple territories including Turkey, Greece, Indonesia and Malaysia, and Jaguar bought international airlines. As previously announced, the project also sold to Atlas in Germany, Imagem in Latin America and Eagle in the Middle East.

Written by Brandon Boyce, the film, being sold by Electric Entertainment, centers on »


- Rebecca Ford

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