‘Bonnie and Clyde’ at 50: A Revolutionary Film That Now Looks Like the Last Work of Hollywood Classicism

‘Bonnie and Clyde’ at 50: A Revolutionary Film That Now Looks Like the Last Work of Hollywood Classicism
Fifty years ago today, American movies were born again. That was the day “Bonnie and Clyde,” the lethally disruptive and exciting gangster saga that brought on the implosion of Hollywood — and the reinvention of Hollywood — was released in theaters. The gun-on-the-run magnetism of Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway; the ’30s desolation set to a jaunty bluegrass vibe; the bursts of violence and quick stinging death; the burnished colors; the screwball neurotic players (Gene Hackman, Michael J. Pollard, Estelle Parsons, Gene Wilder); the fantastic doomed recklessness of it all.

It took a while for “Bonnie and Clyde” to catch on. The picture stumbled out of the gate, and its studio, Warner Bros., had to reboot its opening. But once that happened, “Bonnie and Clyde” dunked the cinema in a baptism of style and blood and glamour and adulthood. It was a revolution both holy and unholy. From that moment on, American films would reach higher than they ever
See full article at Variety - Film News »

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