12 September 2012 8:29 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

In 1992, director Ron Fricke, along with his co-writer Mark Madgison created the documentary Baraka, a stunning collection of expertly photographed scenes of human life, the majority of which involve humanity’s many religions. Fricke was cinematographer and collaborator on Godfrey Reggio’s 1982 non-verbal documentary Koyaanisquatsi and for Baraka he struck out on his own to polish and expand the photographic techniques used on the earlier film. Baraka was a cinematic “guided meditation” (Fricke’s own description) shot in 24 countries on six continents over a 14-month period that united religious ritual, the phenomena of nature, and man’s own destructive powers into a web of moving images. Fricke’s camera ranged, in meditative slow motion or bewildering time-lapse, over the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, the Ryoan-Ji temple in Kyoto, Lake Natron in Tanzania, burning oil fields in Kuwait, the smoldering precipice of an active volcano, a busy subway terminal, »

- Tom Stockman

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