4 May 2011 1:39 PM, PDT | ifc.com | See recent IFC news »

The title of Manuel Munoz's first novel, "What You See in the Dark," refers, among other things, to that act of unashamed voyeurism called moviegoing. At the heart of Munoz's novel, set in Bakersfield, California, in 1959, are the preparations for the making of "Psycho," which would come out the next year. Munoz understands Hitchcock's thriller as a series of ruptures presaging the greater ruptures waiting in the wings of American life. Among those ruptures was this: "Psycho" was the first film to suggest that what we saw in the dark, saw us.

The first shot, the camera sneaking into a cheap motel room to catch Janet Leigh and John Gavin in a midday tryst, invites us to be voyeurs. After that, Hitchcock arranged the film so that it's the moviegoer who's under scrutiny.

The "cruel eyes" watching you that Anthony Perkins' Norman Bates speaks of are there in »


- Charles Taylor

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