Movie News

Ben Stiller to Direct Jonah Hill in Adaptation of Sundance-Winning Documentary ‘We Live in Public’ — Sundance 2018

  • Indiewire
Ben Stiller to Direct Jonah Hill in Adaptation of Sundance-Winning Documentary ‘We Live in Public’ — Sundance 2018
Ondi Timoner’s 2009 Sundance Grand Jury Prize-winning documentary, “We Live in Public,” will become a feature film directed by Ben Stiller and starring Jonah Hill as Josh Harris, the dot-com millionaire who carried out a surveillance experiment with 150 residents at a Manhattan hotel amid Y2K panic.

Bold Films will finance the project, which Timoner will produce with Stiller’s Red Hour Films. Timoner announced the project during an interview at a January 20, Dell-sponsored panel, “Life After Sundance — Building a Career in Indie Filmmaking.”

Timoner also briefly discussed “Mapplethorpe,” her just-completed biopic of Robert Mapplethorpe with “The Crown” star Matt Smith in the lead. She said Sundance accepted the film for the 2018 festival, but it hit “a bump” that prevented its screening.

Read More: Portraying Chaos: Ondi Timoner’s “We Live In Public” (Sundance ’09)

Red Hour Films CEO Nicky Weinstock told IndieWire that “We Live In Public” will be penned
See full article at Indiewire »

'Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot': Film Review | Sundance 2018

'Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot': Film Review | Sundance 2018
Not since American Splendor explored the curmudgeonly everyman sensibility of comic-book artist Harvey Pekar has the complicated headspace of a cartoonist been entered with such infectious fondness as in Don't Worry, He Won't Get Far on Foot. A return for Gus Van Sant to the loose-limbed chronicles of outsider existences in Portland, Oregon that first put him on the map, like Mala Noche and Drugstore Cowboy, this unwieldy but consistently enjoyable portrait of paraplegic local hero John Callahan is notable for its generosity of spirit and gentleness. For want of a better word, it's disarmingly chill.

In a terrific performance...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Get Out’ Producers Wanted Jordan Peele to Play TSA Agent Rod

‘Get Out’ Producers Wanted Jordan Peele to Play TSA Agent Rod
“Get Out” producer Sean McKittrick says he failed to convince writer-director Jordan Peele to take a pivotal role in his $250 million-grossing debut. “We tried to force him — not force him, but we tried to encourage him to play the part of Rod that was ultimately played by Lil Rel [Howery],” said McKittrick during a panel at the Producers Guild of America Nominees Breakfast on January 20.

Read More:Producers Guild Nominations Snubs and Surprises: ‘Wonder Woman,’ ‘I, Tonya’ Make the Grade, ‘Phantom Thread’ Doesn’t

Peele, then best-known for his work on the Comedy Central series “Key and Peele,” declined, stipulating, “‘The moment the audience sees my face, they’re not going to take [the film] seriously,'” said McKittrick, a partner at QC Entertainment. “He knew from the get-go how to keep the tone, which was very thin-ice throughout, it could veer off at any moment.”

In the film, Tsa agent Rob rescues his
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance Scene and Heard: Black Eyed Peas, Issa Rae, Joaquin Phoenix and More (Photos)

Sundance Scene and Heard: Black Eyed Peas, Issa Rae, Joaquin Phoenix and More (Photos)
Ethan Hawke deserved to kick back after making the rounds for two films at Sundance Friday night, “Blaze,” which he wrote and directed, and “Juliet, Naked,” which he stars in. But Lena Waithe and Issa Rae did anything but that at Showtime’s party at the IMDb Studio for Waithe’s new series “The Chi.” How is Nic Cage so cool? Remember, he is a Coppola. Before a midnight screening of “Mandy,” on Friday night (Jan. 19), Cage and Kevin Smith held the early lead for one of the top shots of the festival so far. What are the Black Eyed Peas doing...
See full article at The Wrap »

Marc Munden To Helm ‘The Secret Garden’ For David Heyman & Studiocanal

Marc Munden To Helm ‘The Secret Garden’ For David Heyman & Studiocanal
Exclusive: Heyday Films and Studiocanal’s new take on the classic children’s novel The Secret Garden has found its director. Marc Munden will helm from a script penned by Jack Thorne. Shooting starts in the spring with Studiocanal fully financing. David Heyman will produce via his Heyday banner with the company’s Rosie Alison producing alongside him. The picture will be out to cast soon. Based on Frances Hodgson Burnett’s 1911 book, the story centers on Mary Lennox, a…
See full article at Deadline »

Sundance: Why Ruth Bader Ginsburg Could Be the Toast of the Fest

Sundance: Why Ruth Bader Ginsburg Could Be the Toast of the Fest
RBG, the documentary about her life and legacy that first screens at Sundance on Jan. 21 — could be the toast of the fest. "Millennials are big fans of hers," says Julie Cohen, who directed the film along with Betsy West. "What they love about her is the contrast between her seriousness of purpose and her lighter side."

Having embraced the hip-hop moniker Notorious Rbg (originally bestowed upon her by an NYU law student), Ginsburg doesn't shy away from the notoriety...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Sundance: Sony Pictures Worldwide Nabs Foreign Rights to ‘Hearts Beat Loud’

Sundance: Sony Pictures Worldwide Nabs Foreign Rights to ‘Hearts Beat Loud’
Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions has acquired all international rights to Brett Haley’s “Hearts Beat Loud” in advance of its Sundance Film Festival premiere.

The tender drama about a father (Nick Offerman) trying to convince his daughter (Kiersey Clemons) to form a band premieres on the festival’s last night. It marks Haley’s third Sundance film in four years — he previously debuted “The Hero” and “I’ll See You in My Dreams” at the mountainside gathering. It’s a showy role for Offerman, allowing an actor best known for his comedic turn on “Parks & Recreation” to flex some dramatic muscles.

The deal excludes North American rights and was negotiated on behalf of the filmmakers by Endeavor Content. Sony’s Michael Helfand, Joe Matukewicz, and Jon Freedberg negotiated the deal for the studio.

The film co-stars Ted Danson, Sasha Lane, Blythe Danner, and Toni Collette, with original music by Keegan DeWitt, and is set
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Juliette Binoche Receives UniFrance’s French Cinema Award

Juliette Binoche Receives UniFrance’s French Cinema Award
Following the footsteps of Isabelle Huppert, critically-acclaimed French actress Juliette Binoche received UniFrance’s French Cinema Award during a ceremony hosted at France’s Culture Minister in Paris.

Binoche, who’s just wrapped the shoot of Olivier Assayas’s “Non Fiction,” was celebrated by UniFrance’s new president Serge Toubiana and managing director Isabelle Giordano and several filmmakers she has worked and bonded with over the years, such as Claire Denis, Jean-Jacques Rappeneau and Danièle Thompson.

The actress was honored for her contribution to making French cinema shine abroad. Binoche remains one of the rare French actresses who have earned global recognition, including in the U.S. where she won an Oscar for her performance in “The English Patient” and earned an Oscar nomination for “Chocolat.” A passionate and thoughtful actress, Binoche has been praised for making consistently good career choices and taking roles that push out of her comfort zone, such as [link
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Valerian' Lifts French Film Abroad in 2017

'Valerian' Lifts French Film Abroad in 2017
Despite the international box office disappointment of Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets, the sci-fi epic ushered in a stellar year for French film abroad.

Foreign ticket sales nearly doubled from 2016 with Valerian leading the charge, to 80.5 million admissions worldwide. While the highly anticipated movie was a let down for both French cinema promoters and the company’s bottom line, the film sold 30.6 million tickets and raked in $209 million (€170.9 million) worldwide.

Overall the increase in sales translated into $572.5 million (€468 million) for the French foreign box office, a jump of...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Colette’

As much as we romanticize Belle Époque Paris, the City of Light was not so enlightened when it came to women’s rights at the turn of the 20th century. Their fortunes nearly always depended on marriage, or else being “kept” by wealthy men (and the former by no means guaranteed that one’s husband wouldn’t also sponsor one or more grisettes on the side); they were forbidden from wearing pants and could be arrested for being seen in public dressed in men’s clothes; and as pseudonymous literary sensation “George Sand” demonstrated, they were discouraged from writing and publishing, under their own names at least.

And yet, that was the Paris into which Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette was whisked upon marrying the popular author and critic who went by the name of Willy. Though the young country girl had no ambition to become a novelist, her husband pushed her into that pursuit, and subsequently
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Commuter review – a bonkers pleasure

Liam Neeson plays a salesman asked to find a fellow passenger in a film lacking a coherent narrative

In its hideously edited opening montage, The Commuter takes great pains to communicate that, yes, as per the film’s title, Liam Neeson’s cop turned insurance salesman has taken the commuter train to Manhattan every single day for the past 10 years. Unexpectedly, he is made redundant (“I’m 60 years of age, Frank!” he tells his boss), and his bad luck takes a turn for the worse when a mysterious woman (Vera Farmiga) chats him up on the commute home and asks if, hypothetically, he’d locate a passenger in exchange for a hefty wad of cash – or else she’ll have his family killed. Would you do it? That’s what she wants to know. As a thought experiment it’s kind of interesting. As the plot of a film? Frankly,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The rising star to look out for at the Oscars? That’ll be Netflix…

The success of Mudbound and a string of fine documentaries must surely convince the Academy that the streaming giant deserves a little love

Oscar nominations are unveiled next week, and away from the fluffier speculation over who will win what, many in the industry will be perusing the list with a longer-term question in mind: will this be the year that Netflix finally breaks through? The streaming giant has been buzzing around the awards race for a couple of years now, though the Academy has hitherto mostly swatted it away – loth to give its blessing to films uploaded directly online, give or take a minor cinema release for the sake of form. Two years ago, their complete shut-out of Beasts of No Nation – Netflix’s first narrative original, scooped fresh from an acclaimed festival run – seemed a pointed vote in favour of traditional distribution models, notwithstanding the film’s recognition
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

MyFrenchFilmFestival: ‘The Summer Movie’s’ Emmanuel Marre on Roadtrips, Depression, Male Sensibility

Having won at IndieLisboa, the Clermont-Ferrand and Fribourg, “The Summer Movie” presents a simple story, the brief encounter between a man who has lost his way in life and a boy on a road-trip through the south of France. The set-up might seem simple but slowly the the story fades into the background of its locations: Roadside eat-places, a pavement by a highway, an anonymous hotel. Those kind of places that are constantly being visited without ever becoming inhabited. Like its spaces, “The Summer Movie” tells a story without truly showing it. Director Emmanuel Marre makes a distinctive and sometimes disconcerting narrative emphasis not on eloquent moments of great narrative weight but on elusive ones of daily life, which are momentarily inhabited and which, though only sometimes, are endowed with greater meaning. Variety interviewed Marre whose “The Summer Film” is one highlight of the just-begun MyFrenchFilmFestival.

Where does the idea for “The Summer Film” come from?

I
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Producers Guild Awards 2018: ‘The Shape of Water’ Seizes Oscar Momentum

Producers Guild Awards 2018: ‘The Shape of Water’ Seizes Oscar Momentum
“The Shape of Water” is rapidly becoming the Best Picture Oscar favorite after winning the 29th PGA Awards Saturday night, with producers Guillermo del Toro and J. Miles Dale taking home the top Darryl F. Zanuck prize. That’s two in a row for del Toro’s adult fairy tale of love and inclusion after topping the Critics Choice Awards, with momentum heading into Tuesday’s Oscar nominations.

Del Toro, though, winner of the Golden Globe for Best Director, was unable to attend. He was in Mexico with his ailing father. “The Shape of Water” co-star Richard Jenkins read a note on del Toro’s behalf, dedicating the award to both his parents.

For the first time, thanks to a tie, the PGA had a record 11 nominees, with “The Shape of Water” beating Golden Globe winner, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” (both from Fox Searchlight). But “Three Billboards” is the
See full article at Indiewire »

Producers Boost ‘Shape of Water’ Ahead of SAG Awards, Oscar Nominations

Producers Boost ‘Shape of Water’ Ahead of SAG Awards, Oscar Nominations
The Producers Guild of America is the first industry organization of the season to speak up on the year’s best work. The group’s choice: Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water.”

Now what?

For a period of time, the PGA prize was seen as a solid Oscar harbinger. Given that it is the only other organization to use the preferential balloting system employed by the Academy to determine the best picture Oscar nominations and winner, it’s instructive. You can observe how the lineup performs, etc.

But there’s the rub. The PGA lineup never fully matches the Oscar best picture slate, and those variables — films like “Deadpool,” “Ex Machina” and “Straight Outta Compton” in recent years — are certain to have an impact on the math. The last two PGA winners, “The Big Short” and “La La Land,” failed to translate their victories into Oscar gold.

So, again, now what?
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Review: ‘Leave No Trace’ Is A Rock-Solid Coming-of-Age Story from ‘Winter’s Bone’ Director Debra Granik — Sundance 2018

Sundance Review: ‘Leave No Trace’ Is A Rock-Solid Coming-of-Age Story from ‘Winter’s Bone’ Director Debra Granik — Sundance 2018
Debra Granik is drawn to stories about survivors — stories about people who don’t fit into the one that America likes to tell itself, but are no less valuable for that. They live in the margins, far removed from the capitalistic power of what Ken Kesey once called the Combine. Some of them, like the destitute 17-year-old Jennifer Lawrence played in “Winter’s Bone,” were simply born there. Others, like the tender but troubled Vietnam vet at the heart of Granik’s 2014 documentary “Stray Dog,” have been too close to the big machine, and can’t stomach the idea of going anywhere near it again.

The terse and wary father in Granik’s latest film most definitely falls into the latter category. In fact, that’s all we really know about him. A man as humble and inscrutably compassionate as the movie around him, Will (Ben Foster) doesn’t like
See full article at Indiewire »

PGA Awards: ‘The Shape Of Water’ Wins Outstanding Producer; ‘Handmaid’s Tale’, ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Tops In TV – Full Winners List

PGA Awards: ‘The Shape Of Water’ Wins Outstanding Producer; ‘Handmaid’s Tale’, ‘Mrs. Maisel’ Tops In TV – Full Winners List
Updated with final results: Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water solidified its status as an Oscar Best Picture frontrunner in a season where there are several, taking home the top honor at the 29th annual PGA Awards tonight at the Beverly Hilton. On the TV side, a pair of streaming series rookies — Amazon’s comedy The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel and Hulu’s drama The Handmaid’s Tale — came away with marquee honors. Del Toro, who won the Best Director Golden Globe already…
See full article at Deadline »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Mandy’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Mandy’
Panos Cosmatos’ 2010 debut feature “Beyond the Black Rainbow” was the kind of movie that divides genre fans into two camps, the enraptured and the infuriated. Visually striking but awfully murky in the realms of plot and meaning, it signaled the arrival of a talent that might prove formidable, or might turn out to be all style and no substance.

Fortunately, his followup “Mandy” maintains all of “Rainbow’s” aesthetic fascination while considerably stepping up the pace and narrative coherency. It will again appeal primarily to artier fan sensibilities — this hallucinogenic mashup of Satanic-cult horror and revenge thriller isn’t exactly multiplex fare — but anyone with a taste for Nicolas Cage in full gonzo mode should get some fun out of its fever-dream progress.

The first half hour or so is more or less a portent-filled romance, with lumberjack Red (Cage) and pulp-fiction cover illustrator Mandy (Andrea Riseborough), two misfits who’ve blissfully found each other in a Pacific
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Film Review: ‘Leave No Trace’

Sundance Film Review: ‘Leave No Trace’
Like the scrappy Brown Dirt Cowboy to Viggo Mortensen’s six-kid “Captain Fantastic,” Ben Foster plays a renegade dad who insists on raising his daughter on his own terms in Debra Granik’s “Leave No Trace.” For fans of the director’s “Winter’s Bone,” which effectively launched Jennifer Lawrence’s career, this unconventional family portrait shares many qualities with the 2010 film, including profound empathy for backwoods characters and the discovery of yet another young talent in Thomasin Harcourt McKenzie. Just don’t expect the same kind of reception. Apart debuting to receptive audiences at Sundance, this low-key character study will likely leave little to no trace on the cultural conversation.

In recent years, America’s cinematic ecosystem has grown increasingly inhospitable to earnest independent productions like this, films which admirably but ill-advisedly steer clear of those contrivances (such as “likable” protagonists and ticking-clock suspense) that might ensure a more populist reception. Here, Granik
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Producers Guild Awards 2018: The Complete Winners List, from “The Shape of Water” to “Coco” and “Jane”

Producers Guild Awards 2018: The Complete Winners List, from “The Shape of Water” to “Coco” and “Jane”
The Producers Guild Awards anointed “The Shape of Water” as its Best Picture, the same result as last week’s Critics’ Choice Awards. Guillermo del Toro’s “fairy tale for troubled times” was previously the most-nominated Golden Globes and BAFTA Awards feature, giving Fox Searchlight reason to feel hopeful in ahead of January 23 Oscar nominations.

However, tonight’s event at the Beverly Hills Hilton was more somber and subdued. “Shape of Water” co-star Richard Jenkins read a letter from del Toro: “Life has a way of keeping you in check. So as you sit there tonight, I stand by the side of my father’s bed, in my hometown in Mexico.”

Milestone Award and Visionary Award honorees Donna Langley (Universal Pictures Chairman) and Oscar-winning director Ava DuVernay (“13th,” “A Wrinkle in Time”) respectively used their stage time to remember Allison Shearmur, producer of films like “The Hunger Games” and “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story,
See full article at Indiewire »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.