11 articles


‘Beauty and the Beast’ Soars Past $500 Million Global Mark at Friday Box Office

22 hours ago | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast” will easily hold on to the No. 1 spot at the box office in its second weekend in theaters, making $23.6 million on Friday to reach $252 million domestic and soar past the $500 million global milestone in just a week, reaching $541 million worldwide. Disney now estimates that the film will pass the $300 million domestic mark by the end of the weekend, which would make “Beauty” the sixth film to pass that mark in just ten days. Coming in second is Lionsgate’s “Power Rangers,” the highest among newcomers this week, with $15 million »


- Jeremy Fuster

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Justice League: first full trailer released online

21 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The trailer for the much-hyped DC Comics superhero movie sees Batman, Wonder Woman and Aquaman join forces

The first full trailer for the much-anticipated superhero-team movie Justice League has been released onto the internet.

Directed by Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice’s Zack Snyder, Justice League has been heavily hyped as DC Comics’ answer to Marvel’s The Avengers, which provided a gateway into multiple character spin-off movies and allowed its superhero “universe” to mushroom. Justice League features the likes of Batman, Aquaman and Wonder Woman, and is due to be followed by films giving each character solo outings. Wonder Woman, released in June, stars Gal Gadot, while Aquaman should be arriving in December 2018. The Batman has been beset by well-publicised production troubles, and is not likely to start shooting until next year.

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- Guardian film

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Aquarius review – she shall not be moved

5 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Sônia Braga is outstanding as a woman refusing to be forced out of her Recife apartment in this powerful Brazilian satire

A performance of tremendous wit, vitality and lusty defiance by Sônia Braga drives Brazilian film-maker Kleber Mendonça Filho’s remarkable second feature. A portrait of a 65-year-old woman refusing to be bullied out of her seafront apartment by developers, Aquarius is both a powerful celebration of its independent heroine and a scathing satire on institutional corruption. Like the writer/director’s fable-inflected 2004 short Vinil Verde, it is a film fascinated by the magical power of scratchy old records, of mother-daughter bonds, of transformational living spaces. And as with his first feature, Neighbouring Sounds, it presents a community haunted by artefacts of the past and the architecture of change, social and personal conflicts seamlessly intertwined.

Retired music critic Clara (Braga) lives in the 1940s-built Aquarius apartment block in upmarket Recife. »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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The Lost City of Z review – lush jungle adventure

5 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Glorious music, photography and Robert Pattinson’s beard make this trip up the Amazon just about worth it

“Terrible diseases, murderous savages.” Not to mention waters that boil with piranhas: Col Percival Fawcett (Charlie Hunnam) is prepared to face all of this and more on a mapping expedition to Bolivia. His hope is that a successful mission will help him excise the shame that clings to his family name like some parasitic growth. But in fact, in James Gray’s uneven account of a real-life explorer’s obsession with Amazonia, Fawcett discovers that he feels more alive picking leeches out of his armpit hair than he ever did in the drawing rooms of polite society. And there are moments of richly realised magic here in which we fully sympathise with him.

A nod to Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo is one – a gorgeously odd segment in which Fawcett and his team stumble »

- Wendy Ide

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All This Panic: the most relatable film about teenage girlhood ever?

5 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jenny Gage’s intimate documentary of seven Brooklyn teenagers has been praised for its honest account of growing up. We asked four British school friends to assess it

‘I don’t want to age. I think that’s the scariest thing in the entire world,” says Ginger Leigh Ryan, one of the girls featured in Jenny Gage’s documentary All This Panic. Set in the Brooklyn neighbourhood of Clinton Hill and directed by the former Us fashion photographer, with cinematography by her husband Tom Betterton, the film follows seven teenagers – best friends Lena and Ginger, their school friends Sage, Olivia and Ivy, Ginger’s younger sister Dusty, and Dusty’s best friend Delia – over a three-year period.

i-d magazine said the film “might be the most honest documentary about teenage girlhood ever”. That’s a bold claim, but there’s something to be said for the way Gage’s film »

- Simran Hans

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The Autopsy of Jane Doe review – bone-crunching horror

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A father and son coroner team find they have more on their hands than they bargained for

Have you ever wondered what sound rib-cutters make as they crunch into the chest cavity of a corpse? Or the groan of a bone saw as it chops through the skull to reach the brain? Ponder no more, thanks to this enthusiastically gory horror from André Øvredal (who made his name with the terrific Troll Hunter). It’s hard to think of another film that has brought such lip-smacking relish to its sound design. A superior cast (Brian Cox and Emile Hirsch play a father and son coroner team) adds to the fun, as does the production design – the pair work in a dimly lit basement painted the colour of clogged arteries. But the chaotic payoff can’t match the effectively torturous build of tension in the first two acts.

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- Wendy Ide

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Life review – exuberantly grisly Alien rip-off

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Rebecca Ferguson, Jake Gyllenhaal and Ryan Reynolds play an enjoyably gory game of hide-and-seek with a hungry alien

The crew of a space station is picked off, one by one, by an extraterrestrial life form which seems to view the human contents of the craft as some kind of alien finger buffet. And if that premise sounds more than a little familiar, that’s because Daniel Espinosa’s enjoyable sci-fi horror movie shares narrative DNA with everything from Tarkovsky’s Solaris to Danny Boyle’s Sunshine to, most glaringly of all, Ridley Scott’s Alien. But although this is undeniably an Alien rip-off, it’s an Alien rip-off that announces itself with a dizzyingly audacious zero-gravity single-shot sequence in which Ryan Reynolds wrests a wounded satellite out of orbit using a rob otic grabber claw. With this stunning set piece, cinematographer Seamus McGarvey more than meets the challenge set by »

- Wendy Ide

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Paterson; Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them; The Edge of Seventeen and more – review

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jim Jarmusch’s lovely Paterson looks for poetry in the everyday, while a Harry Potter spin-off is all style and no substance

Last week it was World Poetry Day, and if such randomly appointed occasions carried much meaning beyond a trending Twitter hashtag, I’d say it’s an apposite time to be releasing Paterson (Soda, 12) on DVD. Cinema has a patchy record of encapsulating other art forms, but something like a poet’s soul runs through Jim Jarmusch’s lovely, languid study of being. It’s not just in the elegant, surprisingly credible verse (courtesy of the venerable Ron Padgett) supposedly written by its protagonist, a peaceable New Jersey bus driver, exquisitely etched by Adam Driver, living for his lover, his art and, contentedly, not much else. Paterson works up strikingly little conflict as it follows his daily circuit around the faded, resting city with which he shares a name. »

- Guy Lodge

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All This Panic review – striking insight into teenage life

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

An intimate and revealing documentary about girls on the cusp of adulthood in Brooklyn

Shot over a period of three years and as intimate and confessional as a teenage sleepover, this strikingly cinematic vérité documentary follows a group of adolescent girls poised between childhood and the adult world. Stumbling into life on unsteady colts’ legs, and finding their voices in a society that is still more interested in what they look like than what they have to say, we see young women blossom in the safe space that film-maker Jenny Gage has created in front of her camera. A wisp of a thing at 79 minutes, the film punches above its weight when it comes to quietly life-changing insights into the tricky business of growing up.

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- Wendy Ide

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‘Westworld’: Thandie Newton Rules PaleyFest Panel as Showrunners Confirm One Major Theory

6 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Just fucking stonewall them. Nothing!”

These were the words of encouragement that “Westworld” executive producer Jonathan Nolan issued to co-showrunner Lisa Joy on stage Saturday night at the show’s PaleyFest panel, as the duo fought off a wide array of questions about Season 2. While he maintained the Nolan family mandate of secrecy at all costs, Joy was tempted time and time again to reveal show secrets — but to no avail.

“We’re writing right now, and we’re terribly excited about what we’re writing,” Nolan said, noting they would have all the episodes written before shooting begins. “Reddit has already figured it out. So, the third episode twist, we’re changing that.”

During the panel (which also featured executive producer Roberto Patino, and cast members Evan Rachel Wood, James Marsden, Ed Harris, Thandie Newton, and Jimmi Simpson), the creators and cast were peppered with questions about suspicions connected to Season 1 — Dr. »


- Ben Travers

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The Eyes of My Mother review – chilling arthouse horror

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The unnerving story of a young woman damaged by a violent tragedy is restrained and elegant – until suddenly it’s not

This poised feature debut from Nicolas Pesce announces a director who blends arthouse with horror to unnerving, elegant effect. Shot in striking black and white with a camera that drifts, almost languidly, to reveal hints of nightmarish violence, there is a chilly beauty to the austere backwoods America backdrop. A child, home-schooled in dissection and the mysteries of anatomy by her mother, puts her skills into practice when a violent tragedy rends her life apart. Later, as a lonely young adult, Francisca (Kika Magalhães) sets about creating her own family unit by – literally – carving chunks off someone else’s. The film loses some of its cruel precision and restraint in a third act that goes all out for shock value. As a result, the picture ends up more conventional »

- Wendy Ide

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Family-Branded Films On Fire At The B.O.: ‘Beauty And The Beast’ Embraces $89M+; ‘Power Rangers’ Mighty With $40M

6 hours ago | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

3rd Writethru, Saturday 11:45Pm: If there’s a tale as old as time at the box office this weekend, it’s the non-stop trend that premium brands are much bigger stars than the talent on the poster. After a $38.6M Saturday that saw a 64% spike over Friday, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast is now looking at $89.7M in its second run at No. 1, followed by Lionsgate’s theatrical reboot of 1990s franchise Saban’s Power Rangers which is looking at $40M. Granted, Beauty and the… »


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Scarlett Johansson, charismatic queen of science fiction

13 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

With her role as a cyborg in Ghost in the Shell, the actress has sealed her position as our favourite space invader

Hollywood quickly made room on its red carpets for the young Scarlett Johansson in 2003, when she first created a stir in Sofia Coppola’s film, Lost in Translation. It seemed clear that this blonde bombshell from New York, who was so ably sharing the screen with a dyspeptic Bill Murray, would go on to deliver popcorn buckets-full of mainstream audience appeal. Beautiful, mysterious and charismatic: she was already an aspirational trophy for any traditional leading man.

Yet, 14 years on, Johansson is established instead as a rather different sort of screen idol. Following a succession of high-octane blockbusters and off-beat critical hits, the actress is now enshrined as perhaps the leading sci-fi action star of her generation. Where once her sardonic smirks and sultry looks spoke of old-school movie glamour, »

- Vanessa Thorpe

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