16 articles


‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ First Reactions: ‘Total Home Run’

23 June 2017 8:00 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Spider-Man: Homecoming” won’t have any trouble getting a date to the big dance: Early reactions hit the internet on Friday evening, and many in the superhero film press are deeply enmeshed in its charming web. “#SpiderManHomecoming gets it right. It’s gets it All right. It is the greatest, funniest, most exciting Spidey movie. A total home run,” tweeted Cinemablend’s Sean O’Connell after a New York City media screening. #SpiderManHomecoming gets it right. It's gets it All right. It is the greatest, funniest, most exciting Spidey movie. A total home run. — Sean O'Connell (@Sean_OConnell) June 24, 2017 Film critic Mike Ryan from Uproxx. »


- Umberto Gonzalez

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‘Okja': iPic Theaters to Offer Vegetarian-Only Menu for Netflix Movie

23 June 2017 12:29 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Netflix and iPic Theaters have teamed up to offer an all-vegetarian menu for screenings of “Okja,” Bong Joon Ho’s Cannes favorite about a giant pig and the young girl who loves the creature. “Okja” centers on Mija, a defiant child who attempts to rescue her best friend — an enormous but seemingly gentle pig-like creature named Okja — from the clutches of a large corporation that wants to harm her. Also Read: 'Okja' Star Tilda Swinton on How Ivanka Trump Inspired Her Role as 'Daughter of a Different Dubious Dynasty' The menu will offer an array of meatless dishes, »


- Ashley Eady

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Box Office: ‘Transformers: The Last Knight’ Assembles $37.5 Million in Three Days’ Time

17 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Transformers: The Last Knight” had a slightly unconventional Wednesday night opening this week, but its Friday numbers aren’t anything for the Autobots to actually write Cybertron about.

Despite its franchise-low opening, the fifth film in the “Transformers” saga is expected to easily win the first official weekend of summer 2017, while “Wonder Woman” and “Cars 3” will be in a tight race for second place.

Transformers 5” had already pulled in $23.7 million from Wednesday and Thursday showings going into the weekend, but Michael Bay can now add another $13.8 million from 4,069 theaters to his total. This brings the Mark Wahlberg, Josh Duhamel, and Stanley Tucci vehicle from Paramount to just over $40 million so far, with an expected $64 million domestic cume by Sunday’s end for the 5-day.

Related

As ‘Wonder Woman’ Soars, Movies Starring Men Fail to Connect at Box Office

Wonder Woman” continues to prove impenetrable as Patty JenkinsDC Comics adaptation lassoed another $7.35 million on Friday »


- JD Knapp

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‘The Big Sick’ reviews: It could follow in Oscars footsteps of rom-coms like ‘Four Weddings and Funeral’

23 June 2017 11:30 AM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Could “The Big Sick” be one of the year’s earliest Oscar contenders? True, 2017 is nearly half over, so it’s hardly the earliest acclaimed film of the year, but studios usually aren’t in an Oscar frame of mind until the fall, when they start releasing their weightiest biopics, historical dramas, and other such genres that […] »


- Daniel Montgomery

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‘The Leftovers’ & ‘Fargo’ Star Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen’s ‘Widows’

23 June 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Carrie Coon has made quite a name for herself on the small screen recently. Her roles in “Fargo” and “The Leftovers” are putting her in the Emmy discussion. Now, it seems, she’s ready to make that transition to the big screen, and she’s signed up for her next big film. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Coon will soon begin production on “Widows.”

Widows” is based on the 1980’s British TV series about a group of armed robbers who are killed during a heist attempt.

Continue reading ‘The Leftovers’ & ‘Fargo’ Star Carrie Coon Joins Steve McQueen’s ‘Widows’ at The Playlist. »


- Charles Dean

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'All Eyez on Me' Prompts Journalist to Admit Having "Embellished" Tupac Articles

23 June 2017 12:03 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Journalists are supposed to be factual. Then again, copyright law doesn't protect the naked recitation of historical facts. Alas, a quandry showcased in a new lawsuit against Lionsgate, Morgan Creek and others associated with All Eyez on Me, the biopic about the late rapper, Tupac Shakur.

In a complaint filed on Friday in New York federal court, Kevin Powell claims the movie infringes upon several of his articles for Vibe Magazine published in the 1990s. But again, if Shakur's life events are in the public domain, how does a journalist possibly get around copyright limitations to sue filmmakers who tread similar »


- Eriq Gardner

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Edgar Wright Gives a Very Diplomatic Answer for Why He Left Ant-Man

18 hours ago | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

What could’ve been. »


- Devon Ivie

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Okja review – a creature feature to get your teeth into

50 minutes ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Korean director Bong Joon Ho’s genetically modified satire puts a skewer through the meat industry – while also shaking up the future of film

A few months ago, BBC iPlayer released Carnage, a sci-fi inflected satire written and directed by Simon Amstell, set in a near-future world in which a now-vegan human race struggles to come to terms with its meat-eating past. Now, Korean director Bong Joon Ho’s cautionary tale of genetically modified meat arrives on Netflix, with a limited but welcome UK theatrical release. Like Carnage, Okja uses the trappings of sci-fi fantasy to ask uncomfortably down-to-earth questions about where our food comes from, exposing the savage teeth of consumerism behind the friendly smile of corporate capitalism.

In the remote mountains of South Korea, young Mija (An Seo Hyun) has raised and bonded with Okja, one of a batch of “super-piglets” created by the agrichemical corporation Mirando as »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Film-maker Asif Kapadia: ‘Maradona is the third part of a trilogy about child geniuses and fame’

50 minutes ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The director of Senna and Amy on falling in love with his subjects, tackling Maradona, and how his films resemble pop art

London-born director Asif Kapadia is known for his “true fiction” documentaries: 2010’s groundbreaking Senna, about the Formula One icon Ayrton Senna; and Amy, on the short life of Amy Winehouse, which won the Oscar for best documentary feature in 2016. He is currently working on a film about another troubled genius, Diego Maradona. Before factual films, Kapadia made narrative dramas. His first feature, The Warrior, will be screened this summer as part of a Bafta Debuts tour, which showcases a handful of Bafta-winning debut films from leading British directors, such as Lynne Ramsay, Andrea Arnold and Steve McQueen.

The Warrior won two Baftas – for best debut and for outstanding British film in 2003 – but it’s been seen less than some of your other films. Do you think it stands the test of time? »

- Tim Lewis

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Marisa Tomei: ‘I only got to be old very recently’

50 minutes ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A quarter of a century after winning an Oscar for My Cousin Vinny, the actor is causing a stir as Spider-Man’s Aunt May. She talks about being allowed to ‘get old’ and her reputation as a great on-screen kisser

T oo hot, too young, too sexy: these were the cries of outraged comic-book fans on social media when Marisa Tomei was cast as Spider-Man’s Aunt May in July 2015. And the then 50-year-old Oscar winner agreed with the backlash. “I know, right?” laughs Tomei down the phone from New York, where she’s preparing for the blockbuster’s premiere this week. “It’s lucky I didn’t know much about Aunt May, because I might have been horrified if I’d seen the original image of a grey-haired pensioner. Don’t toy with my heart, Marvel. Is that really how you view me?”

She disagrees, though, that her casting »

- Michael Hogan

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Souvenir review – nul points for Huppert

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Isabelle Huppert fails to convince as a former Eurovision singer who’s persuaded to return to the stage

Even the great Isabelle Huppert can have a misfire, it seems. In this drama, she plays a former singer who narrowly missed Eurovision greatness. Now, 30 years later, she toils in a pâté factory, comfortable with the drudge work and obscurity punctuated with shots of numbing booze. Huppert is impressive, up to a point. The point being when, prompted by a 21-year-old co-worker, she returns to the stage. For all the sparkly sheath dresses and camp torch songs, she simply fails to convince as a pop singer.

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- Wendy Ide

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Edith Walks review – a walk on the wild side

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Andrew Kötting explores the legacy of King Harold and his wife in this wonderfully eccentric film

There’s something uniquely wonderful about the unfettered pagan spirit of Andrew Kötting. His film-making has an anarchic lawlessness; a refreshing alternative to pictures that are pruned and shaped to fit into a preordained structure. For this project, Kötting and a band of merry troubadours (including writer Alan Moore and historian Iain Sinclair) embark on a journey by foot from Waltham Abbey to St Leonards-on-Sea. Along the way, they explore the mythic legacy of King Harold and his wife, Edith Swan-Neck (embodied for the pilgrimage by Claurdia Barton). The route is as the crow flies, but it’s embellished with glorious curlicues of eccentricity.

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- Wendy Ide

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Hampstead review – ghastly faux-mance

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Diane Keaton and Brendan Gleeson star as an unlikely couple in this prettified version of a homeless man’s story

The real-life story of a homeless man who built a shack on the edge of London’s Hampstead Heath is scrubbed down, disinfected and prettified for mass consumption. This ghastly faux-mance pays lip service to the housing crisis but has as much genuine empathy as someone whose main concern about rising rents is whether it might push up the price of nannies.

Diane Keaton plays widow Emily, who is struggling to meet the service charges on her portered apartment block. Naturally, having experienced the sharp edge of London’s chronic housing issues, she feels a kinship with Donald (Brendan Gleeson, gruff but cuddly), a tramp who has created an immaculately tended smallholding in the grounds of a disused hospital. This bond boils over into a relationship, once the film has »

- Wendy Ide

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Nowhere: a response to the housing crisis by poet Tony Walsh – audio

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The poet, writer and performer who grew up in social housing in Manchester performs a specially composed poem in response to issues raised in the documentary Dispossession: The Great Housing Swindle

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- Tony Walsh

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Fifty Shades Darker; 20th Century Women; Patriots Day and more – review

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The second Fifty Shades is flawed but easy on the eye, while Annette Bening gives the performance of her life as a single mother in 70s La

I don’t believe in the term “guilty pleasure”: if a film, however ropey, gives me pleasure, I’m not ashamed to concede that something about it is working. Still, the delight I take in Fifty Shades Darker (Universal, 18) pushes this attitude to its limit. The first film based on El James’s potpourri-porn novels was surprisingly sly, pruning and embellishing the author’s lilac prose with something like irony. This follow-up, directed in gaudily gilded fashion by James Foley, falls into more of the source material’s pitfalls of whiplash plotting and inconsistent, doll-like characterisation.

Still played with sporting gumption by Dakota Johnson, S&M novice Anastasia Steele has gone from a curious but self-contained woman to a yes-no-yes-no marionette to »

- Guy Lodge

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Transformers: The Last Knight review – chuck this mess on the scrapheap

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The impenetrable fifth film in the franchise proves that director Michael Bay has run out of ideas

I would hazard a guess that Michael Bay would sooner lose his own testicles than hand over the reins of the Transformers franchise. In fact, given the swilling testosterone that sloshes around these battling space robot movies, the two are perhaps inextricably linked. Bay has effectively been waving his balls in our faces for five films now. But given this latest blitzkrieg of blah, it seems the best thing that could happen to this series would be a new director, with new ideas and, ideally, a passing familiarity with storytelling. That, or consigning the whole metal mess to the scrapheap.

Despite the fact that Bay employs his usual technique of having characters shout descriptions of what is happening on the screen (sample dialogue: “Oh my God, look at that, it’s a big alien ship! »

- Wendy Ide

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In This Corner of the World review – 1940s Japan through the eyes of a teen

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A girl is married off to a boy she barely knows in this rich but unfocused anime

Set in and near Hiroshima during the second world war, this gentle but slightly unfocused anime looks at Japan through the eyes of an 18-year-old girl. Suzu (voiced by Non) is married off to a boy she hardly knows, but makes the most of her ordinary life. The film is particularly rich when it comes to the subdued rhythms and quotidian routines of life, and of Suzu’s culinary adventures. It’s less well developed when it comes to establishing Suzu as a well-rounded character.

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- Wendy Ide

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The Seasons in Quincy: Four Portraits of John Berger review – an unconventional portrait of an unconventional man

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Four short tributes to the writer, featuring Tilda Swinton, are a celebration of independent thought

Four short films are woven together to make an unconventional portrait of an unconventional man: the theorist and writer John Berger. There’s an eloquent moment in which, with one beautifully phrased observation, Berger reduces a room full of intellectuals to appreciative silence. This is a film that celebrates the exchange of ideas, creating a microcosm for independent thought that is every bit as fertile as the fecund mountain farmlands where Berger made his home. But for all the radical political treatises, there is a sense of peace here also – nowhere better shown than in a lovely scene in which Berger and Tilda Swinton sit, perfectly at ease, making a pie and chatting about dads.

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- Wendy Ide

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The Book of Henry review – a toxic swamp of cynicism and manipulation

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A precocious child’s voice fails to ring true in this superficial stab at tackling cancer and abuse

Note to screenwriters: if, when you are writing an 11-year-old character, it becomes necessary to remind the audience repeatedly that “he’s a child”, you may have an issue with the authenticity of the voice. In fact, it’s easier to imagine some of the dialogue in Mr Peabody & Sherman genuinely coming out of the mouth of a dog than it is to believe that a pre-teen would drawl Henry’s world-weary bons mots. That, however, is a minor quibble in this toxic swamp of cynicism and manipulation. You start to wonder if director Colin Trevorrow grew an extra set of arms for this project, just to cope with all the emotional button pushing.

Henry (Jaeden Lieberher) runs his family’s finances, drops phrases like “existential crisis” into his class presentation and »

- Wendy Ide

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First Trailer For ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ Sings A New Song

6 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

The Bellas are going global in the first official trailer for “Pitch Perfect 3,” directed by Trish Sie. While “Pitch Perfect” was rather delightful in the “don’t think too hard about the logistics” type of way, “Pitch Perfect 2” brought any issues from the first and more into the spotlight with ridiculous narrative pivots, casual racism, sexism and homophobia, and suffering from “too much” syndrome where they made everything bigger and louder than the first.

Continue reading First Trailer For ‘Pitch Perfect 3’ Sings A New Song at The Playlist. »

- Ally Johnson

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