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Shaun Of The Dead's Nick Frost Takes Up Salsa Dancing For Cuban Fury

3 May 2012 4:35 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Nick Frost as an aspiring salsa dancer? I can't say I pictured it, but I also can't say I don't absolutely love the potential in a movie that has the Shaun of the Dead star doing a bit of Latin dancing. It looks like we'll see Frost's moves eventually, as he's set to star in a U.K. comedy called Cuban Fury. According to Variety, Frost has signed on to star in Cuban Fury, a film based on his own idea, which will have him playing a "down-on-his-luck man" who decides to revisit his passion for salsa dancing when he falls for his beautiful American boss. Playing said boss, Parks and Recreations' Rashida Jones. Also among the cast are Chris O'Dowd (Bridesmaids) and Twenty-Twelve's Olivia Coleman. Cuban Fury is written by Jon Brown and will mark the feature directorial debut for James Griffiths, whose recent TV credits include NBC's Up »

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The Perfect Audience

3 May 2012 4:25 PM, PDT | blogs.suntimes.com/ebert | See recent Roger Ebert's Blog news »

In a back row of the Virginia Theater in Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, you will see a raised platform just the right size to hold a reclining chair. This is my throne at Ebertfest. Because of havoc wrought by surgery to my back and right shoulder, I cannot sit comfortably in an ordinary chair. Here I recline at the side of my bride, looking upon the packed houses.

I realized something this year that has been true before. Ebertfest draws perfect audiences. During a film that requires total silence, like "Take Shelter," the audience was totally absorbed. During a comedy, like "Joe versus the Volcano," they laughed easily at the right places. They got wound up during "Kinyarwanda" and "Big Fan," and were deeply moved by "A Separation." They were in sympathy with "Terri." They opened their hearts to the beautiful Indian family drama "Patang." They negotiated the deep moral waters of "Higher Ground. »

- Roger Ebert

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Mick Jagger to Host and Perform on the Season Finale of Saturday Night Live

3 May 2012 4:21 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Another decade, another appearance for Mick Jagger on Saturday Night LiveThe Rolling Stones legend will return to SNL for the season finale on May 19th as both a host and a performer.  Jagger and the Stones have appeared on the show numerous times over the years but this will be the first solo perfomance and hosting double duty for the vocalist.  Apparently, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney was originally expected to host, but has rescheduled to appear in the fall when SNL returns.  Count that as a win for the comedy show, as the fact that this is The Rolling Stones' 50th anniversary and the rumor of a possible on-air reunion with Keith Richards should generate a good amount of viewership.  Hit the jump to take a look at some of Jagger's skits from over the years. Check out some of Jagger's SNL performances below: »

- Dave Trumbore

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See What Happens When Experts (Including Us!) Assemble to Talk 'Avengers'

3 May 2012 4:10 PM, PDT | NextMovie | See recent NextMovie news »

 

Get More: Movie Trailers, Movies Blog

 

We will soon live in a world where we can actually go see "The Avengers."

As the final countdown begins, why not fill your waiting time with as much "Avengers" excitement as possible? MTV Movies' own Josh Horowitz has assembled his own super-team of fellow film journalists and comic book fans to talk anything and everything about "The Avengers" (well, maybe not everything — don't worry, no spoilers here!). Grab your hammer or shield and join the powwow with Josh of Splash Page, Alex of MTV Geek and, of course, Breanne of NextMovie.

"The Avengers" opens May 4. Which is, like, in a few hours. »

- Bryan Enk

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Revisiting Colonel Blimp & Le Quai des Brumes

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

They outraged the authorities on release. But the two films, made before and during the second world war, are now considered classics – and will be re-released this month. Our critics consider their impact

Ryan Gilbey on Le Quai des Brumes

It's easy now to call Marcel Carné's Le Quai des Brumes a masterpiece. When the film was released in 1938, such a view was more contentious. In the wake of the collapse of France's Popular Front government, the film was seen as exacerbating the mood of despair creeping into the left. Jean Renoir labelled it "counter-revolutionary". The Motion Picture Herald concluded: "One will be sorry that such art and talents have been used for such a trite and sordid story, which includes not a decent or healthy character." The Vichy government denounced it as "immoral, depressing and detrimental to young people", and declared that if the war was lost, Le Quai des Brumes »

- Ryan Gilbey, Philip Oltermann

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Duplass brothers: 'Our movies can't lose money'

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Duplass brothers helped pioneer the lo-fi mumblecore movement. But will they change their style now big stars are knocking on their door?

Directing duo Jay and Mark Duplass missed out on membership of the Star Wars generation. Or, rather, they turned it down – albeit unwittingly. "I was born in 1973," says Jay, the elder by three years. "Perfect timing, but I just didn't care. I guess we were already on the hunt for grownup adult dramas. HBO broadcast Kramer vs Kramer and Ordinary People. All our friends were obsessed with Star Wars and we were obsessed with hard-hitting relationship dramas."

They laugh at the sensible, grownup boys they once were.

Mark: "Silkwood. We're like, eight!"

Jay: "We've only recently acknowledged to ourselves how ridiculous that seems."

Mark: "Midnight Express!"

Jay: "You'd come home from school and An Unmarried Woman would be on TV. We'd just go: 'I guess this is »

- John Patterson

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Avengers shows you don't need to break the Us first

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The superhero film is just one recent mega-release to open in the States last – does this spell an end to the Us's cultural dominance?

Last weekend, film fans in 39 countries spent $185m watching Avengers Assemble: a superheroic start to blockbuster season. But one nation was conspicuously missing from the list: the Us. Captain America was embraced by Swedes and Peruvians before his countrymen had the chance to see the film known simply as The Avengers in the States. It was a similar story for Battleship, an alien attack movie as American as McDonald's apple pie, which dropped anchor in 26 territories on 11 April, five weeks before it will dock on Us shores.

Ten years ago, the landscape looked very different. The mission to combat piracy led to simultaneous global rollouts – "day and date" releases, in Hollywood lingo – and that was the policy picked for Star Wars: Attack of the Clones »

- Charles Gant

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Angel & Tony – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A poignant love story set on the coast of Normandy, this romance has a social-realist yet eccentric feel

Photojournalist Alix Delaporte has whisked up an intriguing, often affecting debut feature with her tale of two mismatched souls on the Normandy coast. Angel (Clotilde Hesme) is an anguished ex-con, Tony (Grégory Gabedois) a foursquare fisherman who lives with his mum, and their meandering courtship comes framed as a curious meld of high-flown romance and coarse-grained social-realism; pungent and windblown. At its best, Delaporte's film gives the impression of being uncovered as opposed to constructed, like an eccentric bit of driftwood exposed at low tide.

Rating: 3/5

RomanceDramaXan Brooks

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- Xan Brooks

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Clone – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Weird science, but not in a good way, as Eva Green attempts to clone her dead lover. This should not have left the lab

The germ of a good idea lies dormant in the petri dish, waiting for something in this weird, dreary sci-fi romance to shock it into life. In a seaside town of the future Rebecca (Eva Green) is struggling with the sudden death of her lover, Tommy (Doctor Who's Matt Smith) – so she decides to clone him, give birth to Tommy 2.0 and raise him as her son. Things inevitably get discomfortingly sexy, causing Smith to bellow and leap like he's just fixed the Tardis. Shonky science, flat fiction – this should never have left the lab.

Rating: 2/5

Science fiction and fantasyHenry Barnes

guardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More »

- Henry Barnes

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Piggy – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This British thriller starring Martin Compston doesn't leave much time for subtleties amid the head-stampings

It's a British rite-of-passage crime thriller, because it opens with a closeup of the protagonist's face and a voiceover that says "That's me". Me on this occasion is Joe (Martin Compston), an insomniac sufferer of social anxiety who gets paid a visit by confident, violent "Piggy" (Paul Anderson) shortly after the murder of his brother. Piggy, free to enact the grisly retribution that Joe's incapable of, could be a Durden-esque alter ego (Anderson plays him with a similar swagger) – but between the beating and the stamping on heads, we're not given much time to decide.

Rating: 2/5

CrimeThrillerHenry Barnes

guardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds »

- Henry Barnes

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Lawrence of Belgravia – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

St Etienne cohort Paul Kelly turns in a elegant document of 90s indie enigma Lawrence and his fame cravings

Paul Kelly, responsible for most of Saint Etienne's visual output, – such as the River Lea film What Have You Done Today Mervyn Day? and Festival Hall doco This Is Tomorrow – trains his elegant camerawork on another cult music act: the enigmatic (and surname-free) Lawrence, frontman of Felt and Denim. Held in some awe as the lost genius of 80s/90s indie, he's engagingly frank about his fame cravings – "The day I don't have to go on the tube any more will be the day I fucking celebrate" – as he battles to get new band Go Kart Mozart off the ground. But unless you already worship at the altar of Lawrence, there's not much concession made to you; it feels very much for devotees only.

Rating: 3/5

DocumentaryAndrew Pulver

guardian.co.uk »

- Andrew Pulver

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Two Years at Sea – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This study of the day-to-day life of an enigmatic Scottish hermit is intriguing and valuable

What a strange and intriguing film. In grainy, woozy monochrome, and all but wordless, it presents the day-to-day life of an old man who lives utterly alone in remote Scotland in a ramshackle house with a broken-down caravan in the grounds – his background is unexplained. Cutting wood, doing chores, fishing from an inflatable raft, sorting through old photos, he has the look of a hermit or bearded Russian patriarch. The title of this study of extreme solitude reminded me of Ted Hughes's poem Wind: "This house has been far out at sea all night." It is influenced by Andrew Kotting, who is thanked in the credits, and possibly the Argentinian film-maker Lisandro Alonso, although one surreal moment with the caravan reminded me of those weirdo/deadpan Guinness commercials Jonathan Glazer made before moving into feature films. »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Hara-Kiri: Death of a Samurai – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Takashi Miike's 17th-century samurai revenger's tragedy is superbly acted

The endlessly prolific Takashi Miike returns with this superbly acted revenger's tragedy. It is set in 17th-century Japan, and also the subject of a classic 1962 movie, also the subject of a classic 1962 movie by Masaki Kobayashi. A penniless samurai, Hanshiro, arrives at a feudal lord's house and requests the only honourable end available to him: to commit seppuku in the courtyard. The household manager warns Hanshiro that a poor samurai called Motome had arrived there with the same plea only recently, but suspecting emotional blackmail from what they saw as a glorified beggar wanting cash to go away, the samurais there had called his "suicide bluff" and cruelly insisted he go through with it. The film reveals a dramatic connection between Hanshiro and Motome, and exposes an icy hypocrisy and abject power-worship at the heart of the warrior code. This »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Monsieur Lazhar – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Mohamed Fellag is glorious as an Algerian refugee turned primary-school teacher

Only the most obstreperous delinquent could fail to be charmed by Monsieur Lazhar, in which an Algerian refugee plays ramshackle Mary Poppins to the kids at a Montreal primary. This sweet, soulful drama plays out to the scrape of desks and the echo of voices, and showcases a glorious performance from Mohamed Fellag as the substitute teacher who is not quite what he claims. Lazhar gatecrashes the school in the wake of a tragedy. He flounders, he flourishes and is eventually found out. There is just time to deliver one final, moving life lesson before the bell sounds, and the past rolls in to claim him.

Rating: 4/5

World cinemaDramaXan Brooks

guardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds »

- Xan Brooks

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Goodbye First Love – review

3 May 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Mia Hansen-Løve's second film is a clever, persuasive examination of the meaning of first love – and it has a clear streak of autobiography

The 32-year-old film-maker Mia Hansen-Løve began her career acting, notably for Olivier Assayas, whose partner she became. Then, as a director herself, she impressed audiences deeply with her breakthrough feature Father of My Children, in 2009. Un Amour de Jeunesse is a delicate love story, tender and erotic, and drenched in the idealism and seriousness of its central character, Camille (Lola Créton), looking like a very young Penélope Cruz. It is released here under the English title Goodbye First Love, which I think is slightly wrong, pre-empting audience expectations and misreading the film's ambiguity.

This is a fluent, confident and deeply felt movie: unmistakably, if not exactly nakedly, autobiographical. As ever with this kind of personal work, there is an extra pleasure in pondering how and why »

- Peter Bradshaw

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Marc Webb Talks New The Amazing Spider-man Trailer, Running Time, the 3D, the Lizard, and More

3 May 2012 4:00 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Yesterday afternoon, Collider was invited, along with a handful of other outlets, to see the new trailer for The Amazing Spider-Man, due out in theaters on July 3rd.  With summer movie season ramping up and so many highly anticipated blockbusters closer to their release dates, movie lovers are anxious for any glimpses they can get, and the spectacle in this re-imagined tale certainly promises a fun thrill ride.  The cool thing about the trailer is that it also showcases the humanity, humor and romance while clearly having been designed for 3D. After the trailer, director Marc Webb took some time to answer questions about the footage in the trailer and the film, overall.  He talked about how much better the point of view looks now, the process for bringing The Lizard to life, balancing the spectacle with the humanity, finding the humor, playing the 3D as depth, whether he felt »

- Christina Radish

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New 'The Amazing Spider-Man' Trailer

3 May 2012 3:59 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Sony has been busy on the Spider-Man front as of late and conclude their recent marketing push with a brand new trailer for the upcoming 3-D feature, The Amazing Spider-Man. Along with the recently released trailer for The Dark Knight Rises, this new trailer for Spider-Man will play in front of The Avengers this weekend marking what just might end up being the best trio of superhero films to ever hit in one summer frame. Directed by Marc Webb (500 Days of Summer), The Amazing Spider-Man is a reboot of the franchise following Sam Raimi's trilogy that ended on the sour note that was Spider-Man 3 and this time he arrives in theaters with Andrew Garfield playing Peter Parker, an outcast high schooler, abandoned by his parents and raised by his Uncle Ben (Martin Sheen) and Aunt May (Sally Field). The film follows his dealing with the disappearance if his parents, »

- Brad Brevet

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Watch: New Trailer For 'The Amazing Spider-Man' Arrives And Spins A New Web

3 May 2012 3:58 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

With "The Avengers" already in theaters and crushing the box office, and with Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight Rises" looking to deliver the epic finale everyone is hoping for, can Sony's "The Amazing Spider-Man" make it three-for-three? Well, the newest (and, presumably, the last) trailer is here and it's pretty… blah. Sony is going to have to go into overdrive to convince people that it's worth sitting through another two hours of "how Peter Parker got his Spider-Man powers," because, really, this trailer isn't convincing anyone.

The clip features a lot of the same footage that we were shown back in February at the preview for fans/press, and we can't pinpoint anything new in this trailer that we didn't see back then. However, for those who couldn't make it, a lot of this will be brand new. We get glimpses of Rhys Ifans' Lizard villain, Emma Stone looking very adorable, »

- Drew Taylor

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New Trailer for The Amazing Spider-man Starring Andrew Garfield and Emma Stone

3 May 2012 3:52 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

A new trailer for director Marc Webb's The Amazing Spider-Man has gone online.  Compared to the first trailer, we get a much better idea of what the plot/driving force for Peter Parker entails, there's quite a bit more action, and we get some great looks at The Lizard.  Given that the release is a couple of months away, we're finally starting to see some of the finished visual effects shots come in, and they actually look kind of great.  The webslinging has an edge to it and The Lizard has much more texture.  I like Andrew Garfield a whole lot, and the biggest draw for me here is the character work between Garfield and Emma Stone.  They look to have some great chemistry and Garfield brings out a dickish side of Peter Parker that we didn't really see in Sam Raimi's trilogy.  Overall, I'm pretty encouraged by »

- Adam Chitwood

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New Amazing Spider-Man Trailer, Plus Interview With Marc Webb

3 May 2012 3:47 PM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

If you haven.t noticed from the massive amount of Avengers coverage we.ve been doing, it.s superhero week here on Cinema Blend, but the comic book action hasn.t been limited to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. You may remember a time earlier this week when the newest trailer for The Dark Knight Rises arrived online, but that.s not the only major superhero adaptation arriving in theaters this summer. We are now exactly two months away from seeing webhead fly back into movie theaters, and in addition to having a brand new trailer to show you today we have a great little treat. Before we get to desert, let.s have dinner, shall we! The newest preview for the Marc Webb-directed Spider-Man movie has arrived online and you can watch below or catch it in high-res on Apple. But that.s not all we have for you. »

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