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Review: A Stray Refuses To Be Left Behind

"You don't have to live like a refugee," Tom Petty sang in 1979. The musician was reacting to the pressures of the music business when he wrote the lyrics, he said later, but the song has resonated for years because of its harsh and self-accusing tone, a message that rings true even today. In A Stray, a new film by Musa Syeed, the lead character Adan doesn't want to live like a refugee. He's portrayed by Barkhad Abdirahman, who made a notable impression as an angry modern-day pirate opposite Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips. As Adan, he is just as frustrated, but his character expresses himself in a far milder manner. That doesn't mean he's a pushover or an entirely gentle soul. He wants things...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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New poster and trailer for A Stray

A new poster and trailer have arrived online for writer-director Musa Syeed’s (Valley of Saints) award-winning drama A Stray which stars Barkhad Abdirahman; take a look below…

In Minneapolis’ large Somali refugee community, Adan (Barkhad Abdirahman) has nowhere to go. His mom kicked him out, and his friends are tired of his headstrong ways. As a last resort, he moves into the mosque, praying for a little help. Surprisingly, God seems to answer. Adan quickly lands a good job, devout friends, and a newfound faith. When Adan nearly hits a stray dog on the job, he’s forced to take it in for a night. But one of his new mosque friends considers the dog impure, and he throws Adan out. With Adan back on the streets, surrounded by his old crew, ex-girlfriends, prying FBI agents, and his estranged family, the dog may be his only friend as he
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

A Stray: See New Poster, Watch New Trailer, Make Plans for Release

"A Stray avoids pushing its points too hard. Like the dog, it's watchful and observant without barking too much. But it's impossible to leave behind." That's how I concluded my review of A Stray after its world premiere at SXSW earlier this year, so I'm happy to share a new trailer and poster in advance of its theatrical bow in New York at Ifp Media Center on Friday, October 21, as part of the Ifp Screen Forward screening series. A regional roll out throughout the U.S. will follow. Here's a bit more about the film from my review: "In A Stray, a new film by Musa Syeed, the lead character Adan doesn't want to live live a refugee. He's portrayed by Barkhad Abdirahman, who made...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
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‘A Stray’ Exclusive Trailer: A Somali Refugee In Minneapolis Befriends A Stray Dog

‘A Stray’ Exclusive Trailer: A Somali Refugee In Minneapolis Befriends A Stray Dog
Musa Syeed’s film “A Stray” follows Adan (Barkhad Abdirahman), a Somali refugee living in Minneapolis with no place to go. His mom has kicked him out and his friends are tired of his headstrong ways. As a last resort, he moves into the mosque, and surprisingly, God answers his prayers. He quickly lands a good job, devout friends, and a newfound faith, but things go south when Adan nearly hits a stray dog on the job and is forced to take it in for a night. Soon, Adan’s faith will be tested and his only friend in sight is a stray dog. Check out the trailer and poster below.

Read More: SXSW Review: Musa Syeed’s Refugee Drama ‘A Stray

This is Syeed’s second narrative feature film. His first “Valley of Saints,” about a young man’s desperate escape from Kashmir, won the World Cinema Audience Award
See full article at Indiewire »

12 Must-See Films at BAMCinemaFest 2016

  • Indiewire
12 Must-See Films at BAMCinemaFest 2016
This month, Brooklyn plays home to the annual BAMCinemaFest, featuring both some tried and true festival favorites (imagine if Sundance just happened to take place in New York City in the summer) and some brand-new standouts. Here’s the best of what’s on offer, as curated and culled by the IndieWire film team.

Little Men” New York City-centric filmmaker Ira Sachs has long used his keen observational eye to track the worlds of the city’s adult denizens with features like “Love is Strange” and “Keep the Lights On,” but he’s going for a younger set of stars (and troubles) in his moving new feature, “Little Men.” The new film debuted at Sundance earlier this year, where it pulled plenty of heartstrings (including mine) with its gentle, deeply human story of two seemingly different young teens (Theo Taplitz as the worldly Jake, Michael Barbieri as the more rough and tumble Tony) who quickly bond when one of them moves into the other’s Brooklyn neighborhood. Jake and Tony become fast friends, but their relationship is threatened by drama brewing between their parents, as Jake’s parents own the small store that Tony’s mom operates below the family’s apartment.When Jake’s parents (Greg Kinnear and Jennifer Ehle) are bothered by looming money troubles, they turn to Tony’s mom (Paulina García) and ask her to pay a higher rent, a seemingly reasonable query that has heart-breaking consequences for both families and both boys. It’s a small story that hits hard, thanks to wonderful performances and the kind of emotion that’s hard to fake. – Kate Erbland “Kate Plays Christine

It’s usually easy enough to find common themes cropping up at various film festivals, but few people could have anticipated that this year’s Sundance would play home to two stories about Christine Chubbuck, a tragic tale that had been previously unknown by most of the population (the other Chubbuck story to crop up at Sundance was Antonio Campos’ closely observed narrative “Christine,” a winner in its own right). In 1974, Chubbuck — a television reporter for a local Sarasota, Florida TV station — killed herself live on air after a series of disappointing events and a lifetime of mental unhappiness. Robert Greene’s “Kate Plays Christine” takes an ambitious angle on Chubbuck’s story, mixing fact and fiction to present a story of an actress (Kate Lyn Sheil) grappling with her preparations to play Chubbuck in a narrative feature that doesn’t exist. Sheil is tasked with playing a mostly real version of herself, a heightened version of herself as the story winds on and even Chubbuck in a series of re-enactments. The concept is complex, but it pays off, and “Kate Plays Christine” is easily one of the year’s most ambitious and fascinating documentaries. – Ke

“Suited”

This eye-opening documentary focuses on Brooklyn-based tailoring company Bindle & Keep, which designs clothes for transgender and gender fluid clients. Produced by Lena Dunham and her “Girls” producer Jenni Konner, the HBO Documentary looks at fashion through the eyes of several people across the gender identity spectrum, including a transitioning teen in need of a suit for his Bar Mitzvah and a transgender man buying a tuxedo for his wedding. The film has a deep personal connection to Dunham, whose gender nonconforming sister Grace has been a vocal activist within the transgender community. “Suited” is the first solo-directing effort from Jason Benjamin, who previously co-directed the 2002 documentary “Carnival Roots,” about Trinidad & Tobago’s annual music festival. – Graham Winfrey

Wiener-Dog

Todd Solondz’s first directorial effort since 2011’s “Dark Horse” is literally about an animal this time. “Wiener-Dog” follows a dachshund that goes from one strange owner to the next, serving as a central character in four stories that bring out the pointlessness of human existence. The offbeat comedy’s stellar cast includes Greta Gerwig, Danny DeVito, Julie Delpy and “Girls’” Zosia Mamet. Amazon nabbed all domestic media rights to the film at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, while IFC Films is handling the theatrical release. Financed by Megan Ellison’s Annapurna Pictures and produced by Christine Vachon’s Killer Films, the film marked Solondz’s first movie to play at Sundance since 1995’s “Welcome to the Dollhouse.” – Gw

Last Night at the Alamo

Eagle Pennell has become lost to film history, despite making two of the most important films of the modern indie era. His 1978 film “The Whole Shootin’ Match” inspired Robert Redford to start Sundance and his 1984 classic “Last Night at the Alamo” has been championed by Tarantino and Linklater, who along with IFC Films and SXSW founder Louis Black is responsible for the restoration that will be playing at Bam. “Alamo,” which tells the story of a cowboy’s last ditch effort to save a local watering hole, is credited for having given birth to the Austin film scene and for laying the groundwork for the rebirth of the American indie that came later in the decade. Pennell’s career was cut short by alcoholism, but “Alamo” stands tribute to his incredible talent, pioneering spirit and the influence he’s had on so many great filmmakers. – Chris O’Falt

Read More: Indie Legend Who Inspired Sundance, ‘Reservoir Dogs’ And More Will Have Classic Films Restored

“Author: The J.T. LeRoy Story”

J.T. Leroy was an literary and pop culture sensation, until it was revealed that the HIV-positive, ex-male-prostitute teenage author was actually the creation of a 40 year old mother by the name Laura Albert. Jeff Feuerzeig’s documentary, starring Albert and featuring her recorded phone calls from the hoax, is the best yarn of 2016. You will not believe the twist-and-turns of the behind the scenes story of how Albert pulled off the hoax and cultivated close relationships (with her sister-in-law posing at Jt) with celebrities like filmmaker Gus Van Sant and Smashing Pumpkins’ Bill Corgan, both of whom play key supporting roles in this stranger-than-fiction film. Trust us, “Author” will be one of the most entertaining films you see this summer. – Co

Dark Night

Loosely based on the 2012 shooting in Aurora, Colorado during a multiplex screening of “The Dark Knight,” Tim Sutton’s elegantly designed “Dark Night” contains a fascinating, enigmatic agenda. In its opening moments, Maica Armata’s mournful score plays out as we watch a traumatized face lit up by the red-blue glow of a nearby police car. Mirroring the media image of tragedy divorced from the lives affected by it, the ensuing movie fills in those details. Like Gus Van Sant’s “Elephant,” Sutton’s ambitious project dissects the moments surrounding the infamous event with a perceptive eye that avoids passing judgement. While some viewers may find this disaffected approach infuriating — the divisive Sundance reaction suggested as much — there’s no doubting the topicality of Sutton’s technique, which delves into the malaise of daily lives that surrounds every horrific event of this type with a keen eye. It may not change the gun control debate, but it adds a gorgeous and provocative footnote to the conversation. – Eric Kohn

A Stray

Musa Syeed’s tender look at a Somali refugee community in Minneapolis puts a human face on the immigration crisis through the exploits of Adan (Barkhad Abdirahman), a young man adrift in his solitary world. Kicked out by his mother and unwelcome at the local mosque where he tries to crash, Adan meets his only source of companionship in a stray dog he finds wandering the streets. Alternating between social outings and job prospects, Adan’s struggles never strain credibility, even when an FBI agent tries to wrestle control of his situation to turn him into a spy. Shot with near-documentary realism, Syed’s insightful portrait of his forlorn character’s life recalls the earlier films of Ramin Bahrani (“Man Push Cart,” “Chop Shop”), which also capture an oft-ignored side of modern America. With immigration stories all too frequently coopted for political fuel, “A Stray” provides a refreshingly intimate alternative, which should appeal to audiences curious about the bigger picture — or those who can relate to it. – Ek

Goat

After making a blistering impression at the Sundance Film Festival earlier this year, Andrew Neel’s fraternity psychodrama “Goat” comes to Bam with great acclaim and sky high anticipation. Starring breakout Ben Schnetzer and Nick Jonas, the film centers around a 19-year-old college student who pledges the same fraternity as his older brother, only to realize the world of hazing and endless parties is darker than he could ever imagine. In lesser hands, “Goat” would be a one-note takedown of hedonistic bro culture, but Neel’s slick direction brings you to the core of animalistic behavior and forces you to weigh the clashing egos of masculinity. By cutting underneath the layers of machismo, Neel creates a drama of insecurities buried beneath the war between predator and prey. It’s an intense and intelligent study of a world the movies have always been obsessed with. – Zack Sharf

Read More: Sundance: How Robert Greene and Kate Lyn Sheil Made the Festival’s Most Fascinating Documentary

The Childhood of a Leader

Brady Corbet has been one of the most reliable supporting actors in films like “Funny Games,” “Force Majeure,” “Clouds of Sils Maria” and more, and he even broke through as a lead in the great indie “Simon Killer,” but it turns out Corbet’s real skills are behind the camera. In his directorial debut, “The Childhood of a Leader,” the actor creates an unnerving period psychodrama that evokes shades of “The Omen” by way of Hitchcock. Set in Europe after Wwi, the movie follows a young boy as he develops a terrifying ego after witnessing the creation of the Treaty of Versailles. Cast members Robert Pattinson and Berenice Bejo deliver reliably strong turns, but it’s Corbet’s impressive control that makes the film a tightly-wound skin-crawler. His ambition is alive in every frame and detail, resulting in a commanding debut that announces him as a major filmmaker to watch. – Zs

The Love Witch

Meet your new obsession: A spellbinding homage to old pulp paperbacks and the Technicolor melodramas of the 1960s, Anna Biller’s “The Love Witch” is a throwback that’s told with the kind of perverse conviction and studied expertise that would make Quentin Tarantino blush. Shot in velvety 35mm, the film follows a beautiful, sociopathic, love-starved young witch named Elaine (Samantha Robinson, absolutely unforgettable in a demented breakthrough performance) as she blows into a coastal Californian town in desperate search of a replacement for her dead husband. Sex, death, Satanic rituals, God-level costume design, and cinema’s greatest tampon joke ensue, as Biller spins an arch but hyper-sincere story about the true price of patriarchy. – David Ehrlich

Morris From America

Coming-of-age movies are a dime a dozen (and the going rate is even cheaper at Sundance), but Chad Hartigan’s absurdly charming follow-up to “This Is Martin Bonner” puts a fresh spin on a tired genre. Played by lovable newcomer Markees Christmas, Morris is a 13-year-old New Yorker who’s forced to move to the suburbs of Germany when his widower dad (a note-perfect Craig Robinson) accepts a job as the coach of a Heidelberg soccer team. It’s tough being a teen, but Morris — as the only black kid in a foreign town that still has one foot stuck in the old world — has it way harder than most. But there’s a whole lot of joy here, as Hartigan’s sweet and sensitive fish out of water story leverages a handful of killer performances into a great little movie about becoming your own man. – De

BAMCinemaFest 2016 runs from June 15 – 26.

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Related storiesChristine Chubbuck: Video Exists of Reporter's On-Air Suicide That Inspired Two Sundance Films'Wiener-Dog' Trailer: Greta Gerwig Befriends a Dachshund in Todd Solondz's Dark Sundance Comedy'Little Men,' 'Wiener-Dog' and More Set for BAMcinemaFest 2016 -- Indiewire's Tuesday Rundown
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: ‘A Stray’

Film Review: ‘A Stray’
A temporarily homeless young Somalian refugee man and an abandoned mutt both fit the title description in “A Stray,” Musa Syeed’s sophomore feature. Like his first film, the 2012 Sundance-premiered “Valley of Saints,” this slice-of-life miniature trades in effective, mostly non-pro performances, low-key drama and empathy toward cultural outsiders. The non-sensational light thrown on U.S. Muslim communities might give a leg up to what’s primarily a festival item, with modest specialty home-format prospects.

Crashing with a mate after being thrown out of his mother’s apartment in the same building, Adan (Barkhad Abdirahman, “Captain Phillips”) childishly overreacts to a petty dispute, and decides to scram rather than face the angry consequences. With nowhere else to go — he’s apparently burned all his other bridges — he wanders the Minneapolis streets, sleeping where he can. (Mercifully, it’s not winter yet.)

When he’s found loitering at a neighborhood mosque,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

SXSW Review: Musa Syeed's Refugee Drama 'A Stray'

During a time when unfounded vitriol and demonization of immigrants is becoming increasingly commonplace —thanks mostly to the hateful demagoguery of a certain presidential candidate— films that present an honest, straightforward look into the immigrant experience have become crucial. Apart from assured direction and strong performances, “A Stray” succeeds because even though it’s about a specific cultural group in the United States, it manages to depict universal, relatable truths about the plight of those newly arrived in the country. Read More: 2016 SXSW Film Festival: 12 Films & TV Highlights To Look Out For Writer/director Musa Syeed’s film takes place in Minneapolis, which hosts a sizable Somalian immigrant community. The story, regarding a down-on-his-luck Somalian refugee named Adan (Barkhad Abdirahman), doesn’t shy away from showing the specific cultural conflicts a Muslim Somalian immigrant may face in the U.S., but the general issues depicted could easily...
See full article at The Playlist »

A Stray | 2016 SXSW Film Festival Review

Boy and His Dog: Syeed Offers Rare Glimpse into Urban Somali Community

For his sophomore effort, A Stray, director Musa Syeed focuses on a specific, rarely glimpsed community of Muslim refugees living in Minneapolis, an urban metropolis noted for its diverse, albeit hegemonic, communities. It’s a spare story about a woebegone young man struggling to make the best of an impossible situation, who, due to conditioned religious beliefs and without a stable home life, makes a daring decision to take an ownerless dog under his care. Though hardly as apathetic as the subject matter would indicate, the film is more an observational portrait of a community as staunchly defined by its own paradigms as the contradictory political sentiments of the sometimes hostile host culture enveloping it. A lack of complex depictions concerning various refugee crises and troubled Muslim relations in American cinema marks the film as an automatic item of note,
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

SXSW 2016 Review: In A Stray, Refugees Are Not Left Behind

"You don't have to live like a refugee," Tom Petty sang in 1979. The musician was reacting to the pressures of the music business when he wrote the lyrics, he said later, but the song has resonated for years because of its harsh and self-accusing tone, a message that rings true even today. In A Stray, a new film by Musa Syeed, the lead character Adan doesn't want to live live a refugee. He's portrayed by Barkhad Abdirahman, who made a notable impression as an angry modern-day pirate opposite Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips. As Adan, he is just as frustrated, but his character expresses himself in a far milder manner. That doesn't mean he's a pushover or an entirely gentle soul. He wants things...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Oscars: Get to know a Best Picture nominee: “Captain Phillips”

Directed by: Paul Greengrass Written by: Billy Ray Main cast members: Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi, Catherine Keener, Max Martini, Barkhad Abdirahman, Faysal Ahmed, Michael Chernus Number of Oscar nominations in total: 6 Other nominations besides Best Picture: Best Supporting Actor (Abdi), Best Adapted Screenplay (Ray), Best Film Editing, Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing Notable precursor wins: Won Best Adapted Screenplay at the Writers Guild of America Awards, Won Best Supporting Actor at the London Critics Circle Film Awards, and Won Best Edited Feature Film – Dramatic at the American Cinema Editors Ace Eddie Awards Chances at winning Best Picture: A long shot contender, but not the longest of shots in the lineup Chances at other Academy Award wins: Perhaps the new frontrunner for Best Film Editing, with a fighter’s chance at Best Sound Editing and Sound Mixing, plus a potential spoiler in Best Adapted Screenplay Previously in this series: 12 Years
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

7 reasons why you need to watch Captain Phillips online now

7 reasons why you need to watch Captain Phillips online now
Tom Hanks plays the title character in Paul Greengrass's thriller Captain Phillips. Based on a true story of how a Us cargo ship and its crew were taken hostage by Somali pirates, it was one of the most critically acclaimed movies of 2013.

The film is available to watch online now without a subscription, thanks to blinkbox.

Here are seven reasons for you should cancel your plans today and watch Captain Phillips instead:

1. Tom Hanks gives his best performance in years

Hanks is awesome in what is possibly his best dramatic role since 2002's Road To Perdition. You will be rooting for him from start to finish, and he should've been nominated for an Oscar.

2. It has one of the best screen debuts of all time

Barkhad Abdi was deservedly nominated for an Oscar for playing pirate Muse. It is quite possibly the best cinematic debut for a non-child actor ever.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Captain Phillips Blu-Ray Review

One of my top ten films of 2013 was A Hijacking, a little-seen Danish film that, similarly to Paul Greengrass’s Captain Phillips, turns a spotlight on what happens when a group of Somali pirates take over a cargo ship in the Indian Ocean. However, almost everything else about the two films is different.

A Hijacking revels in searingly tense silences, exploring the devastating human cost of the hijacking for the hostages, pirates and negotiators back in Copenhagen. Conversely, Captain Phillips moves at a frenetic pace, jumping from tense confrontation to tense confrontation without allowing its audience opportunity to take a single breath. A Hijacking digs into the pirates’ motives and spreads its focus to three different men, while Captain Phillips is undoubtedly a biopic, laser-focused on giving lead actor Tom Hanks the chance to bring a true American hero to life. One film zeroes in on minute details, while the
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Second Opinion - Captain Phillips (2013)

Captain Phillips, 2013.

Directed by Paul Greengrass.

Starring Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener, Barkhad Abdi, Barkhad Abdirahman, Faysal Ahmed, Mahat M. Ali, Michael Chernus, David Warshofsky, Corey Johnson, Chirs Mulkey and Yul Vazquez.

Synopsis:

The true story of Captain Richard Phillips and the 2009 hijacking by Somali pirates of the Us-flagged Mv Maersk Alabama, the first American cargo ship to be hijacked in two hundred years.

I need to preface this review by saying that it may come across as a overly negative. This film has been receiving a lot of high praise, both on Flickering Myth and elsewhere, and I’m not by any means saying Captain Phillips is a bad film but I don’t think it’s deserving of the high ratings.

Firstly, I really liked that this film took place at sea. I don’t think there are enough naval adventures made any more and it made the film
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review - Captain Phillips (2013)

Captain Phillips, 2013.

Directed by Paul Greengrass.

Starring Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener, Barkhad Abdi, Barkhad Abdirahman, Faysal Ahmed, Mahat M. Ali, Michael Chernus, David Warshofsky, Corey Johnson, Chirs Mulkey, and Yul Vazquez.

Synopsis:

The true story of Captain Richard Phillips and the 2009 hijacking by Somali pirates of the Us-flagged Mv Maersk Alabama, the first American cargo ship to be hijacked in two hundred years.

I do not write in hyperbole nor do I exaggerate the truth. You’ll never read a review of mine where I ‘literally rolled around laughing’ or ‘saw the greatest film ever’ three weeks in a row. I do not get swept up in mass hysteria and I’m not afraid to speak my mind on all matter concerning film. Believe me when I tell you every word of my experience having seen Captain Phillips is true.

Captain Phillips is a masterpiece and nothing short of a masterpiece.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Review - Captain Phillips (2013)

Captain Phillips, 2013.

Directed by Paul Greengrass.

Starring Tom Hanks, Catherine Keener, Barkhad Abdi, Barkhad Abdirahman, Faysal Ahmed, Mahat M. Ali, Michael Chernus, David Warshofsky, Corey Johnson, Chirs Mulkey and Yul Vazquez.

Synopsis:

The true story of Captain Richard Phillips and the 2009 hijacking by Somali pirates of the Us-flagged Mv Maersk Alabama, the first American cargo ship to be hijacked in two hundred years.

Some spoilers (though it’s a true-life story...but yeah, spoilers nonetheless)...

At the tail of significant publicity, Captain Phillips is released nationwide on October 18th, having premiered at the opening night gala of the 2013 London Film Festival and apparently boasting a career-best performance from Tom Hanks. Directed by Paul Greengrass, it recreates the events of the 2009 Maersk Alabama hijacking, during which four pirates hijacked a cargo ship off the coast of Somalia and took its captain hostage in a lifeboat.

To start with the positives, and
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Greengrass and Hanks Action Thriller: Both 'Incomplete' and 'Less Than Completely Satisfying'

Captain Phillips’: ’Incomplete’ and ’less than completely satisfying’ (photo: Mahat M. Ali, Tom Hanks, Faysal Ahmed in ’Captain Phillips’) In Paul Greengrass’ thriller starring Tom Hanks, Captain Phillips, the titular Captain is a merchant ship’s skipper whose cargo vessel, the Mv Maersk Alabama, was hijacked by Somali pirates in March 2009. The event became worldwide news in nearly real time after the Captain was taken hostage by the pirates, who fled the merchant vessel in one of its lifeboats. In short order, the four pirates, with Captain Phillips under armed duress, found themselves pursued and surrounded by several American naval war vessels intent on preventing the Captain from being taken to Somalia — the inference being quite clear to all. Mostly adapted from the Captain’s memoir — a book with the unwieldy title A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy SEALs, and Dangerous Days at Sea — Captain Phillips is conversely
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Weekend Box Office Summary: Gravity tops Captain Phillips with big $44.5 million sophomore run

Warner Bros. Pictures' senstational sci-fi thriller drama Gravity starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney has topped the box office for a second weekend over Sony's debuting Somali pirate actioner Captain Phillips with a big $44.5 million sophomore run. That's very impressive, showing just 21% change compared to its debut weekend gross of $55.7 million. That brings the film scripted by Alfonso Cuaron and Jonas Cuaron's, (helmed by Alfonso) total to over $123.3 million, already covering its $100 million production budget. This is undoubtedly one of the best films of the year, and could land Bullock her third Academy Award. Tom Hanks starrer Captain Phillips grossed an estimated $26 million on its debut weekend. The Paul Greengrass film which has also received excellent reviews, , averaged $8,609 per theater and is scripted by Billy Ray based on the book "A Captain's Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy SEALs, and Dangerous Days at Sea" by Richard Phillips with Stephan Talty. Barkhad Abdi,
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Captain to Give Hanks One of His Biggest Domestic Box Office Openings in a Decade

Tom Hanks’ ‘Captain Phillips’ weekend box office: One of Hanks’ biggest domestic openings in the past decade Starring two-time Oscar winner Tom Hanks in the title role — though you wouldn’t know it by looking at the film’s poster — Paul Greengrass’ inspired-by-real-life-events Captain Phillips grossed an estimated $8.5 million from 3,020 venues on Friday, October 11, 2013, including $600,000 from Thursday night showings, according to studio estimates found at Box Office Mojo. Captain Phillips chronicles the adventures of the titular captain of an American cargo ship hijacked by Somali pirates in 2009. (Photo: Tom Hanks in Captain Phillips.) Budgeted at $55 million — not including marketing and distribution expenses — Captain Phillips should collect anywhere between $23-25 million by Sunday evening. A major Saturday surge and a strong Sunday hold could lead to even higher results, but for now that’s mere speculation. Either way, Captain Phillips has absolutely no chance of topping this weekend’s domestic box office chart,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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