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Paying Attention: Antoine Bourges Discusses "Fail to Appear"

  • MUBI
After making a series of films set in or around Vancouver's Downtown Eastside (an area that blatantly externalizes the city's socioeconomic disparities), Paris-born, (now) Toronto-based filmmaker Antoine Bourges' turned his eye towards Canadian social institutions and support networks, particularly for those struggling with mental health issues or addiction. More specifically, he looked at their fundamental inadequacy—not through a feature-length exposé, but by observing the individuals that often bear the brunt of the cost. The film, Fail to Appear, charts the meeting of two such individuals: Isolde (Deragh Campbell), a well-meaning, but inexperienced social worker, and her client Eric (Nathan Roder), a man charged with theft and awaiting a court hearing, first introduced solely by a case file. Pointedly bifurcated to follow each character individually, the film structures itself around negative spaces, various gaps—in personal attention, social interaction, and institutional bureaucracy—and the incremental weight of what gets lost therein.
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Northern Streams: Future//Present at Viff 2017

  • MUBI
Prototype (Blake Williams)The 36th Vancouver Film Festival recently wrapped, and with it, the second year of the Future//Present program, a selection of eight features (and a number of shorts) dedicated to emerging Canadian filmmakers. If the inaugural edition had the task of distinguishing itself from the rest of the festival's True North “stream,” this year's offered the opportunity to cement its relevancy and expand its vision. That's something for which the admirably varied program proved more or less able, albeit with higher highs and lower lows than in 2016, which speaks, at least, to chances being taken (something that can't necessarily be said of the festival's programming in general). Taken on the whole, there are—beyond the uniting sensibility of critic and programmer Adam Cook—filmmaking trends that one could identify, and patterns that one could connect, for better and for worse, to the larger contemporary arthouse scene. But the most successful selections,
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Tiff 2017 Adds More Programs: “Alias Grace” Series to Make World Premiere

Alias Grace”: Jan Thijs/Netflix

The Toronto International Film Festival announced even more programs for its 2017 edition today. In addition to the Canadian and Cinematheque film lineups, Tiff unveiled the finalists for Telefilm Canada Pitch This! in which filmmaking teams will have the chance to pitch their film idea to a panel of industry experts. The fest also announced that Montreal filmmaker Anne Émond (“Our Loved Ones,” “Nuit #1”) has been selected as the 2017 Len Blum Resident.

One of our most anticipated TV projects of the year, Netflix’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel “Alias Grace,” will make its world premiere in Tiff’s Canadian slate, a collection of works from Canadian filmmakers. “Alias Grace” is a six-part miniseries about Grace Marks (Sarah Gadon), a real-life Irish immigrant and servant in 1840s Upper Canada who was accused — and convicted — of murdering her employer and his housekeeper. The series is written and produced by Sarah Polley (“Stories We Tell,” “Away from Her”) and directed by Mary Harron (“American Psycho,” “I Shot Andy Warhol”).

In honor of Canada’s 150th birthday, this year’s Cinematheque event will celebrate Canadian filmmakers by “revisiting and restoring landmarks of Canada’s cinematic history.” Cinematheque will feature a screening of the digitally-restored “I’ve Heard the Mermaids Singing,” written and directed by Patricia Rozema (“Into the Forest”). The 1987 comedic drama follows a photographer (Sheila McCarthy) who discovers that a gallery owner and talented painter (Paule Baillargeon) is actually passing off her lover’s (Ann-Marie MacDonald) artwork as her own.

The Len Blum Residency will see Émond live and work at Tiff Bell Lightbox for two months. She will also receive mentorship from Blum himself, the veteran screenwriter of films like “Stripes” and “Meatballs.” Émond has directed four features and several shorts. Her most recent film, “Nelly,” made its world debut at Tiff 2016. It is a biopic about Canadian novelist Nelly Arcan.

Tiff will be held September 7–17, 2017. Check out the women-directed and co-directed films in the Canadian, Cinematheque, and Pitch This! slates below. Lists and synopses adapted from Tiff.

Canadian

Masters

“Our People Will Be Healed”

Alanis Obomsawin, Canada World Premiere

Discovery

“Ava”

Sadaf Foroughi, Iran/Canada/Qatar World Premiere

Mary Goes Round

Molly McGlynn, Canada World Premiere

“Never Steady, Never Still”

Kathleen Hepburn, Canada World Premiere

Contemporary World Cinema

Meditation Park

Mina Shum, Canada World Premiere

Porcupine Lake

Ingrid Veninger, Canada World Premiere

Primetime

Alias Grace

Mary Harron, Canada/USA World Premiere

Cinematheque

“I’ve Heard the Mermaids Singing”

Patricia Rozema, Canada, 1987

Pitch This!

“12 Days,” Jennifer Mesich, Tracey Deer

Inspired by the remarkable true story of an Indigenous woman who overcame the odds to survive 12 days in the Canadian wilderness. Attacked by a trusted friend, she suffered a broken jaw and was left to die. She persevered and lived to tell the tale.

“Boring Girls,” Coral Aiken, Hannah Cheesman

A deadly coming-of-age story about two teenage girls, Rachel and Fern, who become rising stars in the death metal scene. After experiencing an assault, they decide to embark on a bloody quest for revenge, more gruesome than any of their lyrics.

“Fall from the Sky,” Dan Montgomery, Deragh Campbell, Kaz Radwanski

Lucy, a 30-year-old woman with symptoms of schizophrenia, works as a teacher at a Toronto daycare centre. She begins to experience episodes at work, and struggles to navigate her employment, students, co-workers and personal relationships.

Imposter,” Adam Goldhammer, Evan Landry, Katie McMillan

Lamia Eaton, a teenager isolated on a remote maple farm, investigates her mother’s uncharacteristic and increasingly eerie behavior. As she begins to unearth an evil presence infecting the farm, Lamia is no longer able to trust anyone, including herself.

“Nadia, Butterfly,” Dominique Dussault, Pascal Plante

“Nadia, Butterfly” reveals the backstage world of the Olympic Games through the eyes of Nadia, a 20-year-old butterfly swimmer. Doubt-ridden about her post-Olympic future after winning bronze for Team Canada at the relay, her very last professional event, Nadia loses herself into lustful nights of excesses, punctuated by episodes of deep questioning.

Tiff 2017 Adds More Programs: “Alias Grace” Series to Make World Premiere was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Mary Harron, Kim Nguyen among Tiff Canada line-up

  • ScreenDaily
Festival brass unveil Rising Stars, Telefilm Canada Pitch This! finallists, and more.

Mary Harron, Kim Nguyen (both pictured above), Ingrid Veninger, and Denis Côté are among the familiar names in the 26-strong Canadian Features slate that Toronto International Film Festival programmers unveiled on Wednesday.

The selection comprises the highest number of feature directorial debutants and films from Western Canada in recent years. More than 30% of the titles are by first-time feature directors.

Festival brass also announced Short Cuts, Tiff Cinematheque, Rising Stars, Telefilm Canada Pitch This! finallists, and the recipient of the 2017 Len Blum Residency.

The 42nd Toronto International Film Festival runs from September 7-17.

Canadian Features

“It is exciting to see a new wave of Canadian first-time feature directors play with genres and take risks,” Tiff senior programmer Steve Gravestock said. “This year’s line-up has a truly international feel to it, too, with a number of features shot all over the globe — something that also
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Film Acquisition Rundown: Bleecker Street Picks Up ‘Megan Leavey,’ Imagination Worldwide Buys ‘Paint It Black’ and More

  • Indiewire
Film Acquisition Rundown: Bleecker Street Picks Up ‘Megan Leavey,’ Imagination Worldwide Buys ‘Paint It Black’ and More
Keep up with the wild and wooly world of indie film acquisitions with our weekly Rundown of everything that’s been picked up around the globe. Check out last week’s Rundown here.

– Bleecker Street has secured U.S. distribution rights to Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s true-life story, “Megan Leavey.” The film is based on the life of Leavey (Kate Mara), a young marine corporal in the K9 unit whose unique discipline and bond with her military combat dog saved many lives during their deployment in Iraq.

Bleecker Street will release the movie on June 9, 2017.

Read More: Film Acquisition Rundown: Samuel Goldwyn Films Picks Up ‘Youth in Oregon,’ The Orchard Buys ‘Monkey Business’ and More

The film co-stars Edie Falco, Ramon Rodriguez, Bradley Whitford, and Common. Directed by Cowperthwaite (“Blackfish”), the movie was written by Pamela Gray, Annie Mumolo and Tim Lovestedt and produced by Mickey Liddell, Pete Shilaimon and Jennifer Monroe.
See full article at Indiewire »

SXSW Film ‘The Other Half,’ Starring Tatiana Maslany, to Get U.S. Release

SXSW Film ‘The Other Half,’ Starring Tatiana Maslany, to Get U.S. Release
The Other Half,” the indie drama that premiered at SXSW last year, has been picked up by distributor Brainstorm Media for release in U.S. theaters in March. Director and writer Joey Klein’s love story earned a strong review from Variety in its festival bow in 2016.

The storyline centers on a grieving young man, played by Tom Cullen (“Downton Abbey”), and his budding relationship with Emily, an artist depicted by “Orphan Black” star and Emmy winner Tatiana Maslany. Over the course of the film, Emily’s bipolar disorder brings trauma and tension to the already-precarious union.

“This film was a standout for us at SXSW, with such beautiful and intimate performances,” said Brainstorm Media president Meyer Shwarzstein. The distribution company will coordinate the U.S. release in theaters and on video-on-demand, both set for March 10.

Jonathan Bronfman from JoBro Productions and Nicole Hilliard-Forde
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Towards a Canadian Cinema: Future//Present and Viff 2016

  • MUBI
Last year the The Globe & Mail released an article entitled "What is Wrong with the Canadian Film Industry?" that outlined the problems facing our country’s cinema: low box-office numbers, a crisis of English-Canadian identity, an inability to compete with Hollywood entertainments etc., etc. Focused entirely on the industry, the piece fails to mention the resurgence that had been taking root for quite some time. 2015 was an important year for Canadian cinema, but while Room, Hyena Road and Wet Bum ate up the article’s word count, three of the year’s great Canadian films by emerging directors went unnoticed: Isiah Medina’s 88:88, Kurt Walker’s Hit 2 Pass, and Kazik Radwanski’s How Heavy This Hammer. Equating cinema with ‘content,’ a product to be bought and sold, the article is as much a reflection of the problems with Canadian cinema as an exposition of it. But this insidious
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Natural Histories: Sofia Bohdanowicz Discusses Her Debut Feature

  • MUBI
Wieczór (An Evening)“Those are the kinds of things I like to remember,” says an elderly widow reminiscing about her granddaughter’s first communion at the end of Never Eat Alone, Sofia Bohdanowicz’s tender, touching feature debut. It’s a line that reverberates not just through the film itself—which is premiering in Future//Present, a new program of the Vancouver International Film Festival dedicated to emerging voices in Canadian film—but also throughout Bohdanowicz’s small, but distinctive body of work thus far.The infinities of a life, whether shared or solitary, remembered or forgotten, lived or imagined, seem to be at the heart of the Toronto native’s cinema, which is certainly true of the three shorts she directed in 2013 and which are screening alongside her debut feature. All shot in the Etobicoke home of her paternal grandmother, the films are at once formally rigorous and intensely personal,
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Watch Tatiana Maslany and Tom Cullen Fall for Each Other in SXSW Premiere ‘The Other Half’ (Exclusive)

Watch Tatiana Maslany and Tom Cullen Fall for Each Other in SXSW Premiere ‘The Other Half’ (Exclusive)
Orphan Black” star Tatiana Maslany and “Downton Abbey” thesp Tom Cullen will premiere their new film, “The Other Half,” at South By Southwest on March 11, and Variety has an exclusive sneak peek at the drama, in which a grief-stricken man and a bipolar woman fall in love and try to forge a simple life together.

Speaking to Variety after her Emmy nomination last year, Maslany explained how much of a “passion project” the film is for herself and Cullen — who are also a couple off-screen and serve as executive producers on the feature.

“It’s about two people who are very broken and very much in love with each other and trying to make it work. It’s a very simple story but told really beautifully,” she said. “The director is Joey Klein, and I’m working opposite Tom Cullen and it’s like a family affair. It’s a
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Watch Tatiana Maslany and Tom Cullen Fall for Each Other in SXSW Premiere ‘The Other Half’ (Exclusive)

Watch Tatiana Maslany and Tom Cullen Fall for Each Other in SXSW Premiere ‘The Other Half’ (Exclusive)
Orphan Black” star Tatiana Maslany and “Downton Abbey” thesp Tom Cullen will premiere their new film, “The Other Half,” at South By Southwest on March 11, and Variety has an exclusive sneak peek at the drama, in which a grief-stricken man and a bipolar woman fall in love and try to forge a simple life together.

Speaking to Variety after her Emmy nomination last year, Maslany explained how much of a “passion project” the film is for herself and Cullen — who are also a couple off-screen and serve as executive producers on the feature.

“It’s about two people who are very broken and very much in love with each other and trying to make it work. It’s a very simple story but told really beautifully,” she said. “The director is Joey Klein, and I’m working opposite Tom Cullen and it’s like a family affair. It’s a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Stinking Heaven | Review

A Place on Earth: Silver’s Period Commune Channels Cinema-Verite

While his 2014 title Uncertain Terms still awaits theatrical release as it makes the rounds of the festival circuit after premiering last year at the Los Angeles Film Festival, the increasingly prolific Nathan Silver unveils his fifth feature. Stinking Heaven represents a change of pace stylistically and dramatically within Silver’s preferred parameters examining human beings tossed vicariously into strained living situations, where they often wear each other down to an inevitable breaking point. A period piece set within the confines of a well-meaning commune in early 90s suburban New Jersey, the grainy look and feel of Silver’s film lends it a vintage realism that aligns it with the cinema-verite styling of documentary filmmaker Allan King, whose films like Warrendale and A Married Couple focused, unobtrusively, on isolated groups or units of people in similar fashion.

Lucy (Deragh Campbell) and
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Review: Stinking Heaven, Everything Rotten Is Good

We all live by rules. Whether they are personal choices to undertake or those put upon us by work or family, we live by them. But sometimes those rules can destroy us.Nathan Silver's fifth feature, Stinking Heaven, takes place in suburban New Jersey, circa 1990. Lucy (Deragh Campbell) and Jim (Keith Poulson) are a young married couple who have structured their home as a community for sober living, themselves addicts on the mend. We enter the home amidst a celebration: the wedding of Betty (Eleonore Hendricks) and Kevin (Henri Douvry), surely a bright new beacon in this house for the healing power of love. But when Betty's old flame Ann (Hannah Gross) shows up, it sends the house into a tumult not everyone will come...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Daily | Costa, Rowlands, Kiarostami

In today's roundup: A conversation about films by—and recommended by—Pedro Costa; the work of Gena Rowlands, film by film; Nelson George on Samba Gadjigo and Jason Silverman's documentary about Ousmane Sembene; an appreciation of Satyajit Ray; Aki Kaurismäki Day at DC's; interviews with Abbas Kiarostami and Sean Baker; a new book on Dario Argento's Suspiria; a call to save Anne Carlisle and Slava Tsukerman's Liquid Sky; fashion by Kenneth Anger; Illeana Douglas on Robert De Niro; and Francesca Coppola's Jonny Come Lately, featuring Deragh Campbell, Kentucker Audley and Evan Louison, has premiered online at Filmmaker (18'43"). » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Short Film Premiere: Francesca Coppola’s Jonny Come Lately

“What can be said of a connection that seems to border on captivity? Where does the line between violence & intimacy exist?” That’s how Francesca Coppola introduces her sophomore short film, Jonny Come Lately, further described as focusing on “a fragile, complicated, volatile union between two lovers.” The film features Deragh Campbell, Kentucker Audley and Evan Louison, it was shot on 16mm, and it premieres online today via Filmmaker and courtesy of 1985. Last year, Coppola wrote about her film on the occasion of its Kickstarter launch. Here, she describes what the film means to her and, hopefully, for you: […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

AFI Fest 2015: Mediterranea, James White & Krisha Among New Auteurs and American Independents Films Lineup

A pair of sections that we’ve been covering almost since its inception, the American Film Institute (AFI) announced their selections for the New Auteurs and American Independents line-ups and we’ve got a noteworthy, eyebrow-raising sampling of award-winning items from the Cannes played hellish immigration drama Mediterranea from Jonas Carpignano to Sundance (Josh Mond’s James White) to SXSW (Trey Edward ShultsKrisha) winners. Since Park City days, our Nicholas Bell has reviewed a good chunk of these titles, but we’ll still likely have a couple of more reviews once the festival begins. Here are the selections and jury members.

New Auteurs Selections (11 Titles)

From Afar – When a middle-aged man is assaulted and robbed by a young criminal, an unlikely relationship develops. Dir Lorenzo Vigas. Scr Lorenzo Vigas. Cast Alfredo Castro and Luis Silva. Venezuela/Mexico. U.S. Premiere

DisorderMatthias Schoenaerts plays an ex-soldier who becomes locked
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Toronto announces Canadian line-up

  • ScreenDaily
Toronto announces Canadian line-up
World premieres for Patricia Rozema, Guy Édoin and Stephen Dunn are among the selection scheduled to screen at the Toronto International Film Festival (Tiff).

”The festival is excited to showcase these distinctively Canadian voices,” said Tiff senior programmer Steve Gravestock.

“From compelling documentaries on pressing social issues and complex, affecting dramas to political satires, we are proud to share the impressive range and talent of Canada’s directors.”

“This year’s filmmakers represent the depth and diversity of Canadian storytelling,” said the festival’s film programmes manager Magali Simard.

“By presenting the strong perspectives of the best and brightest in the film industry from across the country, we share with audiences the unique ways Canadians view the world.”

The films will compete for the Canada Goose Award for Best Canadian Feature Film, while the City Of Toronto Award For Best Canadian First Feature Film is also up for grabs.

This year’s Canadian awards jurors are director
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Daily | Lists, Histories, Interviews

In today's roundup of news and views: Charles Mudede on John Sayles's The Brother from Another Planet, André Gregory and Wallace Shawn's list of top ten Criterion releases, Terrence Rafferty on Bernhard Wicki’s The Bridge, Mike D'Angelo on John Ford and Native Americans, Philippa Snow on Ana Lily Armirpour's A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night and Jonathan Glazer's Under the Skin, Patrick Wang on Lisa Joyce's performance in Jonathan Demme's A Master Builder, Kevin Hatch on Bruce Conner, Ryan Gilbey on Wim Wenders, interviews with Jia Zhangke, Hannah Gross and Deragh Campbell—and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Stinking Heaven Actors Hannah Gross and Deragh Campbell

Filmmaker‘s Taylor Hess recently attended and reported on the U.S. in Progress series at the Champs-Élysées Film Festival. While there, she spoke to a number of female directors, producers and actresses. Below, her conversation with Hannah Gross and Deragh Campbell, who both appear in Nathan Silver’s Stinking Heaven. Filmmaker: I Used To be Darker was your first film together, and Deragh, your first time acting? Campbell: Right, I’m not trained. My college degree is in writing and my background is publishing and writing. In a lot of ways I look at acting as another way of interacting with material and […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Daily | Seventh Art, Film Parlato

The new 24th issue of The Seventh Art features a video interview with Matt Porterfield, Hannah Gross and Deragh Campbell, the director and stars of I Used to Be Darker and a video essay on Ann Hui's Boat People. Also in today's roundup: The Paris Review on Better Call Saul and Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger’s Tales of Hoffmann, Criterion's Michael Koresky on Yasujiro Ozu's Walk Cheerfully, That Night’s Wife and Dragnet Girl, Salon on Elia Kazan's America America, the best of Carl Theodor Dreyer, David Thomson on Marlon Brando, news of forthcoming work by Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, Marco Bellocchio and more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Rotterdam 2015: 'Stinking Heaven' review

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ Writer and director Nathan Silver again seeks to explore the dynamics of communal living just as he did in Exit Elena (2012) to Uncertain Terms (2014). In the latter film, pregnant teens take refuge in the home of Carla (Cindy Silver), who plays a maternal, educator role in their lives and aims to protect them from external anxiety. His fifth feature Stinking Heaven (2015), which received its world premiere at Iffr, focuses on the home of Jim (Keith Poulson) and his wife Lucy (Deragh Campbell) in 1990s suburban New Jersey, who have created a commune for sober living, welcoming any recovering addict to live with them peacefully.
See full article at CineVue »
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