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DVD Review: Andrea Arnold’s ‘Wuthering Heights’ Puts ‘The Great Gatsby’ to Shame

Chicago – First Joe Wright sucked the life out of “Anna Karenina” with his meticulously choreographed, self-conscious pageantry. Then Baz Luhrmann proved that while heavy-handed spectacle may have appealed to Jay Gatsby himself, it was a recipe for disaster when applied to F. Scott Fitzgerald’s prose. Nothing kills off the power of a metaphor more than a large neon sign erected to underline its significance.

After seeing Andrea Arnold’s quietly mesmerizing adaptation of Emily Brontë’s 1847 classic “Wuthering Heights,” I’m now hungering to see her take on other literary landmarks, particularly “The Great Gatsby.” Luhrmann’s film hammers home the meaning of Fitzgerald’s writing with such aggravating pomp and circumstance, complete with entire sections of text materializing onscreen, I was half-expecting to see a bouncing Gatsby head spring off each word as it was dutifully recited. Though Wright and Luhrmann pride themselves on their filmic exuberance, Arnold
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Rediscover the Moody Depths of "Wuthering Heights"

The dark and moody new adaptation of Wuthering Heights puts an emphasis on the “wuthering.” Writer-director Andrea Arnold includes extensive footage of the natural world around the Heights to represent the beauty and brutality of nature—both in the world and within the characters. She also explores human nature by telling this entire story from the point of view of Heathcliff.

When young Heathcliff (Solomon Glave) is brought to the Heights by Mr. Earnshaw, he is immediately treated like an outsider not just because he comes from the streets but also because of the dark color of his skin. He is raised as a laborer by the Earnshaw’s and suffers extreme beatings from racist Hindley Earnshaw (Lee Shaw). Heathcliff’s only sense of comfort and refuge comes from Hindley’s younger sister Catherine (Shannon Beer). As children they form an intense emotional bond that follows them through their lives.
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Andrea Arnold Takes Emily Bronte's Drama to New "Wuthering Heights" of Mood and Atmosphere

The dark and moody new adaptation of Wuthering Heights puts an emphasis on the “wuthering.” Writer-director Andrea Arnold includes extensive footage of the natural world around the Heights to represent the beauty and brutality of nature—both in the world and within the characters. She also explores human nature by telling this entire story from the point of view of Heathcliff.

When young Heathcliff (Solomon Glave) is brought to the Heights by Mr. Earnshaw, he is immediately treated like an outsider not just because he comes from the streets but also because of the dark color of his skin. He is raised as a laborer by the Earnshaw’s and suffers extreme beatings from racist Hindley Earnshaw (Lee Shaw). Heathcliff’s only sense of comfort and refuge comes from Hindley’s younger sister Catherine (Shannon Beer). As children they form an intense emotional bond that follows them through their lives.
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Wuthering Heights | Review

Such Great Heights: Andrea Arnold’s Provocative Adaptation Revitalizes Classic Tale

While she’s stated herself that she dislikes the idea of adapting a novel to film, director Andrea Arnold has surprised and surpassed negative connotations with this often bastardizing notion to create one of the most beautiful, original and outstanding interpretations of Emily Bronte’s beloved novel of tempestuous love, Wuthering Heights. Not to mention, the classic tale has been filmed numerous times and to varying degrees (Bunuel’s glorious 1954 version has stood as the most worthwhile but most unavailable stateside, leaving Merle Oberon and Juliette Binoche versions as the definitive cinematic versions to Western eyes), but Arnold has to be given credit for making this a vision all her own, and, inadvertently, she carries with it a cinematic hope that fresh life can indeed be brought to twice told tales, though, to be honest, this kind of treat is considerably rare.
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Wuthering Heights Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Wuthering Heights Movie Review
Title: Wuthering Heights Oscilloscope Laboratories Reviewed for Shockya by Harvey Karten Grade: C Director: Andrea Arnold Screenwriter: Andrea Arnold, Olivia Hetreed, from Emily Brontë’s novel Cast: James Howson, Kaya Scodelario, Steve Evets, Nichola Burley, Oliver Milburn, Lee Shaw Screened at: Broadway, NYC, 9/25/12 Opens: October 5, 2012 Life was nasty, brutish and short in the Yorkshire moors during the early part of the nineteenth century. If you did not die young of tuberculosis, you could suffer the beatings of sadistic people, thrashings which in some cases were avenged—leading to yet more violence. All this is present in Emily Brontë’s sole published novel, “Wuthering Heights,” which though at first faced with [ Read More ]
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