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Mark Zuckerberg Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4) | Mini Bio (1) | Spouse (1) | Trivia (14) | Personal Quotes (66)

Overview (4)

Born in Dobbs Ferry, New York, USA
Birth NameMark Elliot Zuckerberg
Nickname Zuck
Height 5' 7½" (1.71 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Mark Zuckerberg was born on May 14, 1984 in Dobbs Ferry, New York, USA as Mark Elliot Zuckerberg. He is a director and actor, known for 2016 Breakthrough Prize Ceremony (2015), Terms and Conditions May Apply (2013) and Vládnout, pracovat, vydelávat, modlit se, hroutit se (2013). He has been married to Priscilla Chan since May 19, 2012. They have two children.

Spouse (1)

Priscilla Chan (19 May 2012 - present) (2 children)

Trivia (14)

Co-founder, CEO & President of Facebook.
Selected by TIME magazine for the cover of its "Person of the Year 2010" issue.
Zuckerberg made a $100-million donation to the Newark (New Jersey) school system when he appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show: Episode dated 24 September 2010 (2010). Both New Jersey governor Chris Christie and Newark mayor Cory Booker were present during the announcement.
Became the world's youngest billionaire in 2008.
Lives in Palo Alto, California.
Can read and write French, Hebrew, Latin and Ancient Greek.
Captain of his fencing team in college.
After only 8 years in business, Zuckerberg's "Facebook" company declared that it has amassed a reported billion "friends" around the world. [2012]
Younger brother of Randi Zuckerberg.
Speaks Mandarin Chinese fluently.
Announced on 31 July 2015 that he and his wife Priscilla are expecting their first child.
In 2016 his net worth is an estimated $45.7 billion.
On December 1, 2015, Zuckerberg announced the birth of his first child, Maxima Chan Zuckerberg ("Max").
Developing programs to fact-check questionable content and disrupting fake news economics.

Personal Quotes (66)

The only meat I eat is from animals I've killed myself.
Think about what people are doing on Facebook today. They're keeping up with their friends and family, but they're also building an image and identity for themselves, which in a sense is their brand. They're connecting with the audience that they want to connect to. It's almost a disadvantage if you're not on it now.
I just think people have a lot of fiction. But, you know, I mean, the real story of Facebook is just that we've worked so hard for all this time. I mean, the real story is actually probably pretty boring, right? I mean, we just sat at our computers for six years and coded.
By giving people the power to share, we're making the world more transparent.
The biggest risk is not taking any risk... In a world that's changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.
A squirrel dying in front of your house may be more relevant to your interests right now than people dying in Africa.
All of my friends who have younger siblings who are going to college or high school - my number one piece of advice is: You should learn how to program.
Facebook is really about communicating and telling stories... We think that people can really help spread awareness of organ donation and that they want to participate in this to their friends. And that can be a big part of helping solve the crisis that's out there.
I mean, we've built a lot of products that we think are good, and will help people share photos and share videos and write messages to each other. But it's really all about how people are spreading Facebook around the world in all these different countries. And that's what's so amazing about the scale that it's at today.
I think that people just have this core desire to express who they are. And I think that's always existed.
I think a simple rule of business is, if you do the things that are easier first, then you can actually make a lot of progress.
The thing that we are trying to do at Facebook, is just help people connect and communicate more efficiently.
At Facebook, we build tools to help people connect with the people they want and share what they want, and by doing this we are extending people's capacity to build and maintain relationships.
For the first time we're allowing developers who don't work at Facebook to develop applications just as if they were. That's a big deal because it means that all developers have a new way of doing business if they choose to take advantage of it. There are whole companies that are forming whose only product is a Facebook Platform application.
The question isn't, 'What do we want to know about people?', It's, 'What do people want to tell about themselves?'
I don't have an alarm clock. If someone needs to wake me up, then I have my BlackBerry next to me.
I do everything on my phone as a lot of people do.
What really motivates people at Facebook is building stuff that they're proud of.
The basis of our partnership strategy and our partnership approach: We build the social technology. They provide the music.
Move fast and break things. Unless you are breaking stuff, you are not moving fast enough.
Mobile is a lot closer to TV than it is to desktop.
This is our commitment to users and the people who use our service, is that Facebook's a free service. It's free now. It will always be free. We make money through having advertisements and things like that.
Our goal is not to build a platform; it's to be cross all of them.
Right now, with social networks and other tools on the Internet, all of these 500 million people have a way to say what they're thinking and have their voice be heard.
I look at Google and think they have a strong academic culture. Elegant solutions to complex problems.
We want Facebook to be one of the best places people can go to learn how to build stuff. If you want to build a company, nothing better than jumping in and trying to build one. But Facebook is also great for entrepreneurs/hackers. If people want to come for a few years and move on and build something great, that's something we're proud of.
Facebook was not originally created to be a company. It was built to accomplish a social mission - to make the world more open and connected.
The real story of Facebook is just that we've worked so hard for all this time. I mean, the real story is actually probably pretty boring, right? I mean, we just sat at our computers for six years and coded.
I updated my grilling app, iGrill, today and it now has Facebook integration that lets you see what other people are grilling right now around the world. Awesome.
The real question for me is, do people have the tools that they need in order to make those decisions well? And I think that it's actually really important that Facebook continually makes it easier and easier to make those decisions... If people feel like they don't have control over how they're sharing things, then we're failing them.
There are people who are really good managers, people who can manage a big organization, and then there are people who are very analytic or focused on strategy. Those two types don't usually tend to be in the same person. I would put myself much more in the latter camp.
I literally coded Facebook in my dorm room and launched it from my dorm room. I rented a server for $85 a month, and I funded it by putting an ad on the side, and we've funded ever since by putting ads on the side.
Advertising works most effectively when it's in line with what people are already trying to do. And people are trying to communicate in a certain way on Facebook - they share information with their friends, they learn about what their friends are doing - so there's really a whole new opportunity for a new type of advertising model within that.
When you give everyone a voice and give people power, the system usually ends up in a really good place. So, what we view our role as, is giving people that power.
There are a few other things that I built when I was at Harvard that were kind of smaller versions of Facebook. One such program was this program called Match. People could enter the different courses that they were taking, and see what other courses would be correlated with the courses they are taking.
My goal was never to just create a company. A lot of people misinterpret that, as if I don't care about revenue or profit or any of those things. But what not being just a company means to me is not being just that - building something that actually makes a really big change in the world.
We're running the company to serve more people.
The companies that work are the ones that people really care about and have a vision for the world so do something you like.
People at Facebook are fairly used to the press being nice to us or not nice to us.
I started the site when I was 19. I didn't know much about business back then.
I got my first computer in the 6th grade or so. As soon as I got it, I was interested in finding out how it worked and how the programs worked and then figuring out how to write programs at just deeper and deeper levels within the system.
I actually do think you're seeing this trend towards organizations just caring more about their brand and engaging. And so I think Home Depot will want to humanize itself. I think that's a lot of why companies are starting blogs, are just giving more insight into what's going on with them.
Games is probably the biggest industry today that has gone really social, right. I mean, the incumbent game companies are really being disrupted and are quickly trying to become social. And you have companies like Zynga.
Facebook is uniquely positioned to answer questions that people have, like, what sushi restaurants have my friends gone to in New York lately and liked? These are queries you could potentially do with Facebook that you couldn't do with anything else, we just have to do it.
Facebook is inherently viral. There are lots of sites that include a contact importer, and for lots of them it doesn't really make sense. For Facebook it fits so well. It wasn't until a few years in that we started building some tools that made it easier to import friends to the site. That was a huge thing that spiked growth.
Back, you know, a few generations ago, people didn't have a way to share information and express their opinions efficiently to a lot of people. But now they do. Right now, with social networks and other tools on the Internet, all of these 500 million people have a way to say what they're thinking and have their voice be heard.
People have really gotten comfortable not only sharing more information and different kinds, but more openly and with more people - and that social norm is just something that has evolved over time.
On engagement, we're already seeing that mobile users are more likely to be daily active users than desktop users. They're more likely to use Facebook six or seven days of the week.
My friends are people who like building cool stuff. We always have this joke about people who want to just start companies without making something valuable. There's a lot of that in Silicon Valley.
Look at the way celebrities and politicians are using Facebook already. When Ashton Kutcher posts a video, he gets hundreds of pieces of feedback. Maybe he doesn't have time to read them all or respond to them all, but he's getting good feedback and getting a good sense of how people are thinking about that and maybe can respond to some of it.
It used to be the case, like you'd switch jobs, and then maybe you wouldn't keep in touch with all the people that you knew from that old job, just because it was too hard. But one of the things that Facebook does is it makes it really easy to just stay in touch with all these people.
In terms of doing work and in terms of learning and evolving as a person, you just grow more when you get more people's perspectives... I really try and live the mission of the company and... keep everything else in my life extremely simple.
In addition to building better products, a more open world will also encourage businesses to engage with their customers directly and authentically. More than four million businesses have Pages on Facebook that they use to have a dialogue with their customers. We expect this trend to grow as well.
I think that more flow of information, the ability to stay connected to more people makes people more effective as people. And I mean, that's true socially. It makes you have more fun, right. It feels better to be more connected to all these people. You have a richer life.
I hope that Facebook and other Internet technologies were able to help people, just like we hope that we help them communicate and organize and do whatever they want to every single day, but I don't pretend that if Facebook didn't exist, that this wouldn't even be possible. Of course, it would have.
When I was in college I did a lot of stupid things and I don't want to make an excuse for that. Some of the things that people accuse me of are true, some of them aren't. There are pranks, IMs.
This is a perverse thing, personally, but I would rather be in the cycle where people are underestimating us. It gives us latitude to go out and make big bets that excite and amaze people.
There is a huge need and a huge opportunity to get everyone in the world connected, to give everyone a voice and to help transform society for the future. The scale of the technology and infrastructure that must be built is unprecedented, and we believe this is the most important problem we can focus on.
People don't care about what someone says about you in a movie - or even what you say, right? They care about what you build. And if you can make something that makes people's life better, then that's something that's really good.
No one has done a study on this, as far as I can tell, but I think Facebook might be the first place where a large number of people have come out. We didn't create that - society was generally ready for that. I think this is just part of the general trend that we talked about, about society being more open, and I think that's good.
[on criticism of Facebook] I actually don't read most of the coverage. I try to learn by getting input from people who use our services directly, more than from pundits. But yeah, I've heard the general critique. Whenever any technology or innovation comes along and it changes the nature of something, there are always people who lament the change and wish to go back to the previous time. But I think that it's so clearly positive for people in terms of their ability to stay connected to folks.
[observation, 2015] One day I believe we'll be able to send full rich thoughts to each other directly using technology. You'll be able to think of something and your friends will immediately be able to experience it too.
[from a letter to his newborn daughter, saying that her mom and dad plan to donate of 99% of their Facebook stock to philanthropic causes] We want you to grow up in a world better than ours today.
[on users posting fake information] We've been working on this problem for a long time and we take this responsibility seriously. We've made significant progress, but there is more work to be done.
[on why users are posting fake information] A lot of misinformation is driven by financially motivated spam
[on improving Facebook] Our goal is to connect people with the stories they find most meaningful, and we know people want accurate information.

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