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Blood Stripe Movie Review

  • ShockYa
Blood Stripe Movie Review
Blood Stripe Tandem Pictures Director: Remy Auberjonois Written by: Kate Nowlin, Remy Auberjonois Cast: Kate Nowlin, Tom Lipinski, Chris Sullivan, Rusty Schwimmer, Ashlie Atkinson, Ken Marks, Rene Auberjonois Screened at: Critics’ link, NYC, 9/8/17 Opens: Sept. 29, 2017 The movie industry should pay homage to women in the forefront of defending our country against its […]

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Exclusive ‘Blood Stripe’ Trailer: War Comes Home In L.A. Film Festival Winner

While there have been plenty of movies about soldiers returning home from war and adjusting to civilian life, few have been told from a female perspective. However, “Blood Stripe” offers an intriguing break from the usual, and today we have the exclusive trailer for the film.

Co-written and directed by Remy Auberjonois, and starring Kate Nowlin (who also co-wrote the film), Tom Lipinski, Chris Sullivan, Rusty Schwimmer, Ashlie Atkinson, Ken Marks, and Rene Auberjonois, the story follows a woman who returns from three tours in Afghanistan.

Continue reading Exclusive ‘Blood Stripe’ Trailer: War Comes Home In L.A. Film Festival Winner at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Work in progress by Anne-Katrin Titze

Jessica Oreck with Sloan Foundation's Doron Weber Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

The Tribeca Film Institute and Alfred P Sloan Foundation Works-In-Progress Reading had Paul Schneider directing readings by Victor Slezak, Dascha Polanco, Tom Lipinski, Britne Olford and Marshall Factora of Emily Lobsenz's Invisible Islands; Eric Talbach, Olford and Lipinski of Thor Klein's Adventures of a Mathematician, and a clip from Jessica Oreck's One Man Dies A Million Times.

Jessica, the director of The Vanquishing Of The Witch Baba Yaga and cameraperson for David Byrne's Contemporary Color, directed by Bill Ross IV and Turner Ross, spoke with me at the cocktail reception. Amy Hobby, producer of Rachel Israel's Keep the Change, Ferne Pearlstein's The Last Laugh, and Treva Wurmfeld's Sam Shepard doc, Shepard & Dark, is the Executive Director of the Tribeca Film Institute.

Jessica Oreck's One Man Dies A Million Times at NeueHouse Photo: Anne-Katrin
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Exclusive: 'Blindspot' Boss Talks Surprising New Bombshells and an Explosive Death: 'It's a Huge Blow'

Exclusive: 'Blindspot' Boss Talks Surprising New Bombshells and an Explosive Death: 'It's a Huge Blow'
Warning: Spoiler alert! Do not proceed if you haven’t watched Wednesday’s return episode of Blindspot.

Well, that was a doozy.

Blindspot returned for the remainder of the second season on Wednesday night, with an episode that had everything you’d want from the action drama: an explosive death, another internal leak, an ultimatum that may change the team dynamic, and an episode-ending abduction.

Jane (Jaimie Alexander), Weller (Sullivan Stapleton) and company finally gained an upper hand against Shepherd (Michelle Hurd) and Sandstorm, after learning that Shepherd implanted a bug in Patterson’s (Ashley Johnson) tooth in order for her to gain significant intel. After spreading misinformation to lure Shepherd’s minions into a trap, Patterson came face to face with her ex and mole, Borden (Ukweli Roach), only to witness Borden sacrifice himself by blowing up the cabin.

Related: 'Blindspot' Gets a 'Hamilton' Boost With Javier Munoz

Meanwhile, Reed’s ([link
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Mercy Draws You in with Its Mystery: A Film Review

*there are spoilers here (see the film first). Director/writer: Chris Sparling. Cast: James Wolk, Caitlin FitzGerald, Tom Lipinski. Mercy is a horror and thriller from Chris Sparling. Notable for writing 2010's Buried, Sparling has created a very intriguing film, here. The film appears as a letting-go of a family member. But, it proves to be more complex, especially when a group of masked characters are introduced. Two groups of characters are motivated by two very different reasons; neither motivation is very honourable, however. Playing out like a mystery initially, events take a darker turn, at the film's mid-point. It is here where a point-of-view is changed, as well. Grace's (Constance Barron) relationship with a cult-like religious sect, also creates some of the film's mystery. Finally, murderers conflict with these money-counters; everyone loses. However, viewers of Mercy will win with this latest Netflix outing. The film's story plays out straight-forwardly,
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

[Biff Review] Mercy

It’s practically impossible to talk about what’s happening in Chris Sparling‘s latest thriller, Mercy, without spoiling it. The writer-director knows, and splits his film into three pieces as a result: the first third completely shrouded in mystery, the next a replay from alternative perspectives, and the last the truth of the pursuers’ identities and the lies their victims have been spinning from the start. The only other Sparling film I’ve seen is his most popular one, Buried, which he wrote with Rodrigo Cortés directing, but the similarities in deflection and confusion are obvious. Whereas it focused solely on one character trapped without the ability to fully comprehend what’s happening, Mercy places its viewer in the coffin. We don’t know who’s out there and we definitely cannot trust the family in peril.

I’ll stick solely to the first act to whet your suspense-thriller
See full article at The Film Stage »

Girl Trouble: When Women Watch Movies

The Intervention's appealing ensemble. (Courtesy Paramount)

It's no secret that women are still mostly used as beards in studio bromances or scenery in tentpole actioners. But even smaller character-driven films can’t always be counted on to provide satisfaction for those of us yearning to recognize some aspect of ourselves on screen. Faced with intimate stories that fail to bring female characters into focus or ambitious tales that mirror but don’t alleviate the special joys of being a girl (worldwide), female audiences are mostly left to get enlightenment or escape by dreaming ourselves into male characters and stories.

Men rule in the sinister Equity, a sleek woman-powered drama that compels attention from start to finish but occasionally thwarts our need for clarity. Three women’s fates intertwine in what is essentially a horror movie about the perils of being female in the high-stakes world of finance (and elsewhere
See full article at CultureCatch »

Film Guide: What Movie Should I Watch This Weekend? (July 22, 2016)

Film Guide: What Movie Should I Watch This Weekend? (July 22, 2016)
To help sift through the increasing number of new releases (independent or otherwise), the Weekly Film Guide is here! Below you’ll find basic plot, personnel and cinema information for all of this week’s fresh offerings.

For July, we’ve also put together a list for the entire month. We’ve included this week’s list below, complete with information on screening locations for films in limited release.

See More: Here Are All the Upcoming Movies in Theaters for July 2016

Here are the films opening theatrically in the U.S. the week of Friday, July 22. All synopses provided by distributor unless listed otherwise.

Wide

Ice Age: Collision Course

Director: Galen T. Chu, Mike Thermeier

Cast: Adam DeVine, Jennifer Lopez, Melissa Rauch

Synopsis: Scrat’s epic pursuit of his elusive acorn catapults him outside of Earth, where he accidentally sets off a series of cosmic events that transform and threaten the planet.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Don’t Worry Baby’ Exclusive Trailer: Father & Son Discover One Of Them Has Fathered The Child of a One Night Stand

‘Don’t Worry Baby’ Exclusive Trailer: Father & Son Discover One Of Them Has Fathered The Child of a One Night Stand
“Don’t Worry Baby” follows struggling photographer Robert (John Magaro) and his philandering father Harry (Christopher McDonald) as they learn they both had a one-night stand with the same woman, Sarah-Beth (Dreama Walker). Years later, they realize that one of them is the father of Sarah-Beth’s four-year-old daughter.

While they wait for a paternity test, they both decide to assume fatherly duties and soon learn to connect and mend their rocky relationship. The film also stars Tom Lipinski (“Suits”) as Robert’s friend Lenny and Talia Balsam (“Mad Men”) as Robert’s mother and Harry’s ex-wife. Watch the exclusive trailer for the film below.

Read More: Here’s How This First-Time Director Shot A Feature Film in New York City

The film is the feature-length directorial debut of Julian Branciforte, who previously acted in Antonio Campos’ “Afterschool” and directed the shorts “The Necessary Defilement
See full article at Indiewire »

Scott’s Los Angeles Film Festival Dispatch, Part One

Independent cinema is the clear focus at La Film Fest. This doesn’t mean they’re completely clear of the sort of pre-packaged, studio-lite fare that tends to climb awards-season ladders into our multiplexes – this year’s festival featured films starring Chris Messina, Idris Elba, Alfred Molina, Gemma Arterton, Gael Garcia Bernal, Gillian Jacobs, and Topher Grace, plus The Conjuring 2, an outright studio film. And even those films without such attachments are not entirely free from the influence, following familiar beats and a sort of glossy presentation in an attempt to “fit in” with the big boys. The extent to which these films could truly be called “independent” is thus debatable, and lends a sort of discomfort to aligning them with truly adventurous voices. That disparity is most evident in four thrillers that played at the festival, which range from practically begging to be let in to actively refusing any sense of acceptance.
See full article at CriterionCast »

Review: ‘Blood Stripe’

Review: ‘Blood Stripe’
After U.S. participation in the 20th century’s “Great Wars” turned to participation in some not-so-great, still-debated wars, Hollywood tended to take a few years before offering critical fictive input on those conflicts. But American deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan continues to drag on, whatever happy-face scenarios are offered to the media. While we await the big W.-era propaganda critique of Ang Lee’s literary adaptation “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” this fall, “Blood Stripe” delivers a smaller-scale weighing of the “War on Terror’s” toll on average grunts. Veteran actor Remy Auberjonois’ polished feature debut provides an impressive showcase for co-scenarist Kate Nowlin as a career Marine derailed by Ptsd upon return to civilian life. This ambitious drama won the Laff prize for homegrown narrative fiction feature, though its somewhat awkward vacillation between serious character study and under-realized thriller elements will limit commercial exposure.

A thirtysomething Marine Corps sergeant never actually named here, but half-jokingly, half-respectfully referred to as “Our Sergeant” (Nowlin), arrives back from her latest — and perhaps, it seems, last — deployment to a minimal welcome. She’s picked up late at from the airport by an in-law. At home, burly husband Rusty (Chris Sullivan) does not make a display of conspicuous enthusiasm. They seem to have a somewhat prickly, not particularly affectionate relationship, suggestive of pre-existing tensions that go unspecified.

Whatever preceded, however, “Sarge” is clearly barely holding it together in this particular return to civilian life: Pounding beers without effect, compulsively jogging, mowing the lawn at midnight and other borderline-manic actions that seem to be keeping some kind of breakdown thinly at bay. At a welcome-home party, a guest’s playful hug triggers drastic over-reaction from her. After that, there’s no further denying she needs help. But she’s sadly aware that appropriate services at a Va Hospital wouldn’t be available for months, sighing, “There’s a wait.”

One day at the tedious municipal road-work job she’s gotten, something in Our Sergeant snaps. She gets in her car and drives hours to the site of a childhood summer camp. It’s the beginning of the off-season, with seemingly sole remaining employee Dot (Rusty Schwimmer) packing things up for the winter. Having no plan, and not having told anyone where she is, Sarge gets a room-and-board gig that’s just what her anxious mind and coiled Marine body needs: Endless, heavy-lifting grunt work.

The two women’s quiet camaraderie, the tranquil setting, and the hard physical labor do seem to make Sarge better, relaxing such that she answers admiring Dot’s questions about her several Iraq and Afghanistan deployments, in terse but revealing terms. But she’s still in a highly fragile state, agitated further by a mixed bag of interlopers to the camp. They include a visiting group of church elders led by gregarious Art (the writer-helmer’s father René Auberjonois, still a theatrically flamboyant presence in his mid-70s); his adoptive-son-of-sorts (Tom Lipinski as another nameless figure, dubbed only “The Fisherman”), a fellow moody loner; and some local louts whose lewd menace Sarge’s addled mindset may or may not be exaggerating.

It’s when these additional characters arrive at midpoint that real-life spouses Nowlin and Auberjonois’ script begins to stumble, after a strong buildup. While the director has cited such deliberately dislocating films about various forms of mental illness and Ptsd as “Repulsion” and “Martha Marcy May Marlene” as models here, “Blood Stripe” grows more tonally muddled than those singular portraits of escalating trauma. The warm-and-fuzzy church group, Lipinski’s conventional Heathcliff-like romantic figure, the poorly integrated thriller elements (a more congruent film would’ve made those local yokels a constant phantom menace) and a vague, unconvincing climactic catharsis all weaken what had initially seems a tougher-minded film. Then there’s the contrivance necessary to keep Sarge from being “rescued” by Rusty, even after she’s made a couple panicked calls back home.

On the plus side, “Blood Stripe” is cryptic in interesting ways, most notably in that we never actually find out what “happened to” Sarge: The film forgoes convention in omitting a flashback, or even a monologue, wherein a specific traumatic combat incident “explains all.” (At one point, however, we do glimpse dramatic scars on her back, and her automatic-recoil reaction to most physical contact raises the possibility of assault or torture.) That’s a refreshing change from formula, not least because it leaves open the possibility that her Ptsd springs from cumulative experience rather than the typical fictive Big Event — a more realistic approach.

Nowlin fully invests in her role, credibly creating a born career-military type nonetheless pushed over the brink — a fully-combat-participatory female soldier relatively new to both U.S. policy and to movies, if you discount the likes of the ludicrous “G.I. Jane.” Schwimmer, Sullivan and Lipinsky are solid in support, even if the latter’s role feels less organic. While its storytelling wavers, there’s nothing unsteady about the movie’s overall packaging craftsmanship, most notably Radium Cheung’s widescreen photography of the gorgeous northern-Minnesota lake country.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Us Briefs: FilmBuff snaps up 'Don’t Worry Baby'

  • ScreenDaily
Us Briefs: FilmBuff snaps up 'Don’t Worry Baby'
The Us rights deal will see the distributor release the paternity dramedy theatrically and across all major VOD platforms starting July 22.

Don’t Worry Baby stars John Magaro, Christopher McDonald, Tom Lipinski and Dreama Walker and premiered at the 2015 Sarasota Film Festival.

Julian Branciforte directed the co-production by The Sight Group and Manamarin from his screenplay and Nick Shore and Thomas Kaier produced with Jean-Raphael Ambron, Sam Harper and Brendan McHugh.

Jamie Krasnoff and Johnny Sutak are executive producers.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kate Nowlin’s ‘Blood Stripe’ Wins U.S. Fiction Award at La Film Festival

Kate Nowlin’s ‘Blood Stripe’ Wins U.S. Fiction Award at La Film Festival
Kate Nowlin’s thriller “Blood Stripe,” directed by Remy Auberjonois, has won the U.S. Fiction Award at the La Film Festival.

The movie, which marks Auberjonois’ feature debut, centers on a Marine sergeant returning home to find herself hemorrhaging anxiety and paranoia from unseen wounds. Auberjonois directed from a script he co-wrote with Nowlin.

Producers are Schuyler Weiss, Julie Christeas, Auberjonois and Nowlin. Tom Lipinski, Chris Sullivan, Rusty Schwimmer and Auberjonois’ father Rene also star.

The nine-day festival, now in its 22nd year, closes Thursday night with a screening of “Desierto,” starring Gael Garcia Bernal. “Lowriders” was the opening night film.

The U.S. Fiction Jury also awarded a special mention for comedy for “Chee and T,” directed by Tanuj Chopra; and a special mention for visual accomplishment for Amber Tamblyn’s drama “Paint it Black.” Tamblyn co-wrote the script with Ed Dougherty and produced with Wren Arthur, Amy Hobby and Anne Hubbell.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Horror Highlights: The Craft Shirt, Fright Flicks Candles & Magnets, Mercy, Wynonna Earp

“We are the weirdos, mister.” Nancy, Bonnie, Rochelle, and Sarah from Andrew Fleming’s The Craft will put a spell on you with these new shirts by Cavity Colors. Also: Freddy in Space’s Fright Flicks candles and magnets sold by Horror Decor, a trailer / L.A. Film Festival premiere details for Mercy, and, lastly, a new clip from Season 1, Episode 9 of Syfy’s Wynonna Earp.

Cavity Colors’ The Craft Shirts: From Cavity Colors: The Coven Shirt: “Join The Coven…

Available For 72 Hours Only!

After The Time Period Has Passed, This Design Will Vanish Forever.

Also available on: Girls Shirts ($25) / Tanktops ($25) / Baseball Tees ($35)

Quantities / sizes are limited, so don’t miss out!

Style: Unisex T-shirt- click size chart below for measurements.

Printed on our ultra soft Black 100% cotton T-shirts.

Includes printed size tag / logo

Art By: Hillary White

Shipping: Pre-order – Ships in early June

$25.00”

The Weirdos Shirt: “Available For 72 Hours Only!
See full article at DailyDead »

Video: Richard Dreyfuss Doesn't Think Bernie Madoff Is His 'Most Despicable' Character – 'I've Already Played Dick Cheney'

Video: Richard Dreyfuss Doesn't Think Bernie Madoff Is His 'Most Despicable' Character – 'I've Already Played Dick Cheney'
Richard Dreyfuss was able to see some redemption for infamous fraud mastermind Bernie Madoff – but he doesn't give that benefit of the doubt to all his characters.

During his appearance on Good Morning America Wednesday, Dreyfuss was quick to qualify that his eponymous character in the new ABC miniseries is "the second most despicable man [in modern history] because I've already played Dick Cheney."

That zing aside, Dreyfuss gave insights on his process of channeling Madoff – and the surprising empathy he gained for the imprisoned fraudster, now 77, who orchestrated the largest Ponzi scheme ever by an individual and is currently serving a 150-year prison sentence.
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

Richard Dreyfuss Doesn't Think Bernie Madoff Is His 'Most Despicable' Character: 'I've Already Played Dick Cheney'

  • PEOPLE.com
Richard Dreyfuss Doesn't Think Bernie Madoff Is His 'Most Despicable' Character: 'I've Already Played Dick Cheney'
[Youtube "jUK9_Gf8uNU"] Richard Dreyfuss was able to see some redemption for infamous fraud mastermind Bernie Madoff - but he doesn't give that benefit of the doubt to all his characters. During his appearance on Good Morning America Wednesday, Dreyfuss was quick to qualify that his eponymous character in the new ABC miniseries is "the second most despicable man [in modern history] because I've already played Dick Cheney."That zing aside, Dreyfuss gave insights on his process of channeling Madoff - and the surprising empathy he gained for the imprisoned fraudster, now 77, who orchestrated the largest Ponzi scheme ever by an individual and is currently serving a 150-year prison sentence.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Richard Dreyfuss Doesn't Think Bernie Madoff Is His 'Most Despicable' Character: 'I've Already Played Dick Cheney'

  • PEOPLE.com
Richard Dreyfuss Doesn't Think Bernie Madoff Is His 'Most Despicable' Character: 'I've Already Played Dick Cheney'
[Youtube "jUK9_Gf8uNU"] Richard Dreyfuss was able to see some redemption for infamous fraud mastermind Bernie Madoff - but he doesn't give that benefit of the doubt to all his characters. During his appearance on Good Morning America Wednesday, Dreyfuss was quick to qualify that his eponymous character in the new ABC miniseries is "the second most despicable man [in modern history] because I've already played Dick Cheney."That zing aside, Dreyfuss gave insights on his process of channeling Madoff - and the surprising empathy he gained for the imprisoned fraudster, now 77, who orchestrated the largest Ponzi scheme ever by an individual and is currently serving a 150-year prison sentence.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

TV Review: ‘Madoff’

TV Review: ‘Madoff’
ABC News’ fingerprints are all over “Madoff,” a four-hour miniseries chronicling Bernie Madoff’s financial high crimes. News footage (all from ABC, naturally) peppers the project, which is based on a book by correspondent Brian Ross. Yet despite a showy performance by Richard Dreyfuss in the title role, the production is mostly inert, exhibiting a somewhat antiseptic quality, and downplaying perhaps its most fascinating element. Those who invest their time in “Madoff” shouldn’t come away feeling fleeced, exactly, but given the inherent dramatic possibilities in the story, the return for viewers seems at best marginal.

Indeed, while ABC beat HBO to the punch, this production, from the Alphabet’s Lincoln Square arm (previously responsible for its short-lived drama “The Assets,” about CIA mole Aldrich Ames), should do little to temper anticipation for “The Wizard of Lies,” HBO’s upcoming take on the story, starring Robert De Niro and Michelle Pfeiffer.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Knick: Season Two Ratings

Though the first season of The Knick attracted some very positive reviews, the series drew very low ratings. Cinemax brought it back for a second season anyway. Will the numbers go up this time around? Will it be cancelled or renewed for a third season? Stay tuned.

The second season of The Knick continues to follow the troubled professional and personal life of Dr. John W. Thackery (Clive Owen), a physician who works at the Knickerbocker Hospital in New York in the early 1900s. The rest of the cast includes Andre Holland, Jeremy Bobb, Juliet Rylance, Eve Hewson, Michael Angarano, Chris Sullivan, Cara Seymour, Eric Johnson, David Fierro, Maya Kazan, Leon Addison Brown, Grainger Hines, Zaraah Abrahams, Charles Aitken, Latonya Borsay, Rachel Korine, Tom Lipinski, and Michael Nathanson.

Below are the show's TV ratings, typically the best way to tell if the series will
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Watch: ABC’s ‘Madoff’ Trailer Sees Richard Dreyfuss Channeling the Disgraced Financier

Watch: ABC’s ‘Madoff’ Trailer Sees Richard Dreyfuss Channeling the Disgraced Financier
ABC has released the first trailer for its Bernie Madoff miniseries — aptly titled “Madoff” — which will debut on Feb. 3, starring Richard Dreyfuss in the titular role.

“You want to know how to get people to trust you with their money?” he teases in the promo. “I’ll tell you right now: You present it as an exclusive thing… Nothing on Earth makes people want something more than telling them they can’t have it.”

The show also stars Blythe Danner as Madoff’s wife, Ruth; Tom Lipinski and Danny Defarrari as their sons, Mark and Andrew; Peter Scolari as Bernie’s brother Peter; Erin Cummings as Eleanor Squillari; Michael Rispoli as Frank Dipascali; and Frank Whaley as Harry Markopolos. Charles Grodin and Lewis Black will also appear.

“People give me their money and I make them richer than God,” Dreyfuss boasts in the minute-long trailer. “Madoff Securities is the world’s largest Ponzi scheme.
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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