Zal Batmanglij - News Poster

News

2018 Writers Guild Awards winners: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ and ‘Get Out’ win on way to Oscars

2018 Writers Guild Awards winners: ‘Call Me By Your Name’ and ‘Get Out’ win on way to Oscars
Winners of the 2018 Writers Guild of America Awards were revealed on Feb. 11 in ceremonies held simultaneously in Los Angeles and New York. As only screenplays written under the guild’s guidelines or those of several international partners are eligible for consideration, these kudos, which are celebrating their 70th anniversary, have not been the most reliable barometer of the Oscars.

Indeed, one of this year’s leading contenders for Best Original Screenplay at the Oscars — Martin McDonagh for “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — was ruled out of the running by the guild. However, that WGA race does include four of the other Academy Awards nominees — “The Big Sick,” “Get Out,” “Lady Bird” and “The Shape of Water.” It is rounded out by “I, Tonya.” Jordan Peele won for “Get Out” edging out Greta Gerwig, who had been predicted to win for “Lady Bird.”

All five of the Oscar contenders for Best
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Writers Guild Awards: Full list of nominations in 3 film and 14 TV categories

The 2018 Writers Guild of America Awards take place on Feb. 11 with simultaneous ceremonies held in both New York and Los Angeles. Only scripts written under the guild’s guidelines or those of several international partners are allowed to vie for these awards. As such, these kudos are not the most reliable barometer of the Oscars.

In the past nine years only 59 of the WGA nominees have numbered among the 90 screenplays that reaped Academy Awards bids. Indeed, 2014’s Oscar winner for Best Original Screenplay, “Birdman,” was deemed ineligible. Likewise for one of this year’s leading contenders for that award: “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.”

On the television side, the leading nominees are “Better Call Saul,” which competes for best drama series writing as well as for two individual episodes and “The Americans,” which is up for both overall drama series writing and an individual episode. Over in comedy, reigning Emmy
See full article at Gold Derby »

In the Light of History: Rachel Morrison on Shooting Mudbound

With Rachel Morrison the first woman cinematographer nominated for a Best Cinematography Academy Award, we’re running today online from our current print issue David Leitner’s interview with her about shooting her nominated film, Dee Rees’s Mudbound. When Dee Rees’s Mudbound premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, the director was returning to the fest six years after her feature debut, Pariah, launched there. The same year also marked Dp Rachel Morrison’s first feature to be included in the festival, Zal Batmanglij’s Sound of My Voice, and she returned the following year with Ryan Coogler’s Fruitvale Station; Mudbound is her eighth […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Greenlit: Pilot Season is Underway, Netflix, FX + More Projects Are Casting

Greenlit means a project is officially a go, so all you have to do is follow these leads to stay up to date. You never know where you’ll find an opportunity to land an audition! “The Oa”You might still be scratching your head after the finale of 2016’s metaphysical Netflix thriller “The Oa,” but before you’re done thinking through the mind-bending first season, the team is likely going to start on the second. The series was renewed by the streaming service last February, but no word had come about when we might see it, until now. Co-creator Brit Marling shared on Twitter that she and producing partner Zal Batmanglij have been hard at work mapping out the second installment of the series. Filming will officially start this month, but with very little other information besides the knowledge that the second season will feature eight episodes. It’s
See full article at Backstage »

Writers Guild of America 2018 TV Nominations: ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Godless,’ and ‘Big Little Lies’

Writers Guild of America 2018 TV Nominations: ‘Stranger Things,’ ‘Godless,’ and ‘Big Little Lies’
The Writers Guild of America, East (WGAE) and the Writers Guild of America, West (WGAW) have announced nominations for this year’s television categories, including Drama Series, Comedy Series, and Long Form Original. Reigning Emmy winners “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “Veep” are nominated in their respective categories, as is HBO’s acclaimed “Big Little Lies” limited series.

Winners will be honored at the 2018 Writers Guild Awards on Sunday, February 11, 2018. Ceremonies will take place in New York City and Los Angeles. The full list of 2018 nominations are below.

Drama Series

The Americans

Better Call Saul

“The Handmaid’s Tale”

Stranger Things

Comedy Series

Curb Your Enthusiasm

“Glow”

Master of None

Silicon Valley

Veep

Long Form Original

American Horror Story: Cult

Feud: Bette and Joan

“Flint”

Godless

Manhunt: Unabomber

Long Form Adapted

Big Little Lies

“Fargo
See full article at Indiewire »

Dp Rachel Morrison on Creating a Tactile ‘Mudbound’ & Making ‘Black Panther’ Distinct

Rachel Morrison has not-so-quietly emerged as one of the most exciting cinematographers working today. While she had previously shot a number of short films, documentaries, and even the MTV series The Hills, Morrison first started making waves as a director of photography with her work on Zal Batmanglij’s thriller Sound of My Voice, and broke out in a big way with Ryan Coogler’s terrific 2013 debut Fruitvale Station. Wearing her documentary influences on her sleeve with a knack for textured and deep frames that accentuate the most human of characteristics, Morrison went on to shoot films …
See full article at Collider.com »

Interview, Audio: Danielle Macdonald on Title Role in ‘Patti Cake$’

Chicago – How does a native Australian actress become a New Jersey hip hop artist? Practice, practice, practice… in formulating the character of “Patti Cake$.” Danielle Macdonald, who had never rapped before in her life, portrayed the title Jersey Girl with a stellar determination, poignancy and heart.

“Patti Cake$” features Danielle as that title character, that of a bartender with a talent for hip hop rhymes, and her friends Jheri (Sid Dhananjay) and Bob (Mamoudou Athie), who want to help her record those beats. Patti’s home life is difficult, as her mother Barb (Bridget Everett) is depressed and unstable, plus her beloved grandmother (Cathy Moriarty) is fighting a homebound illness. But Patti will not be stopped, despite her weight, the odds and her obsession with rapper O-z (Sahr Ngaujah). The film was written and directed by Geremy Jasper, making his debut as a feature filmmaker.

Danielle Macdonald Brings it Home
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

How ‘The Glass Castle’ Director Destin Daniel Cretton Went From SXSW Breakout to Development Hell

How ‘The Glass Castle’ Director Destin Daniel Cretton Went From SXSW Breakout to Development Hell
Every breakout independent filmmaker faces the same challenge: Now what? You could stick to your own taste and never make money on your movies; that requires a second career as a professor, screenwriter, commercial, music video, or TV director (see: Kelly Reichardt, Alex Ross Perry, Zal Batmanglij, Errol Morris).

Or, you can walk another tightrope: Try to build your cred without selling out, and parlay that surge of attention into a sustainable career. Destin Daniel Cretton chose that path, and Lionsgate’s “The Glass Castle” starring Brie Larson is the result.

Read More:Brie Larson On the Kind of Roles She Never Wants: ‘I Won’t Take the Job If It’s Like That’

After the Hawaiian writer-director’s first feature, “I am Not a Hipster,” debuted at Sundance 2012, his agent sent him on the usual round of meetings. But it was his SXSW 2013 competition-winning gritty rehab drama, “Short Term 12,
See full article at Indiewire »

How ‘The Glass Castle’ Director Destin Daniel Cretton Went From SXSW Breakout to Development Hell

How ‘The Glass Castle’ Director Destin Daniel Cretton Went From SXSW Breakout to Development Hell
Every breakout independent filmmaker faces the same challenge: Now what? You could stick to your own taste and never make money on your movies; that requires a second career as a professor, screenwriter, commercial, music video, or TV director (see: Kelly Reichardt, Alex Ross Perry, Zal Batmanglij, Errol Morris).

Or, you can walk another tightrope: Try to build your cred without selling out, and parlay that surge of attention into a sustainable career. Destin Daniel Cretton chose that path, and Lionsgate’s “The Glass Castle” starring Brie Larson is the result.

Read More:Brie Larson On the Kind of Roles She Never Wants: ‘I Won’t Take the Job If It’s Like That’

After the Hawaiian writer-director’s first feature, “I am Not a Hipster,” debuted at Sundance 2012, his agent sent him on the usual round of meetings. But it was his SXSW 2013 competition-winning gritty rehab drama, “Short Term 12,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Jason Isaacs On His Experience In ‘The Oa’: “I’ve Never Encountered Something As Imaginative”

For those wondering whether The Oa star Jason Isaacs gravitates toward villainous roles, or if these roles come to him, the answer is neither. A Golden Globe- and BAFTA Award-nominee with a gift for portraying darker characters with added nuance, the ever modest actor simply looks for well-written material which he feels he can pull off “without looking terrible.” Taking the leap with the Netflix series from co-creators Zal Batmanglij and Brit Marling—who also…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Brit Marling and Issa Rae on Feeling a ‘Moral Imperative to Write’

Brit Marling and Issa Rae on Feeling a ‘Moral Imperative to Write’
Brit Marling and Issa Rae sat down for an interview for Variety’s “Actors on Actors” series. For more, click here.

Issa Rae: What do you feel about “The Oa” resonated with your audience, just people in general?

Brit Marling: It’s such a good question, I’m not sure I really know. Sometimes I think it’s funny. We make these things, and we put them out in the world, and then we just have to see what connects. But something I’ve heard people describe about it is that it has a kind of unfettered quality — that it seems like drinking milk that hasn’t been pasteurized. And I think that’s because it was very handmade by a very small group of people, especially Zal Batmanglij, who is the show creator. I think it has a quality that doesn’t usually manage to find its way onto television.

Rae:
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Sci-Fi Newbies Hope to Follow in ‘Game of Thrones’ Epic Emmy Footsteps

Sci-Fi Newbies Hope to Follow in ‘Game of Thrones’ Epic Emmy Footsteps
There’s no doubt HBO’s “Game of Thrones” has been a game-changer for TV. It has delivered record ratings for its network, blazed a trail for epic fantasy on the small screen and rewritten the conventional wisdom about how genre programming fares at the Emmys, breaking the record for most wins by a scripted show at last year’s ceremony.

The success of “Thrones” has spurred just about every network to jump on the fantasy/sci-fi bandwagon in some way, and it’s no surprise that many of the series that fit the trend are high-quality offerings in their own right. But what remains an open question is to what degree the TV Academy will embrace this year’s crop of freshman genre contenders.

Two presumed heavyweights had a jump start on awards season: Netflix’s “Stranger Things” and HBO’s “Westworld” premiered in 2016, making them eligible for various guild awards and the Golden Globes, at
See full article at Variety - TV News »

From 'Twin Peaks' to 'American Gods': Welcome to the Golden Age of Weird TV

From 'Twin Peaks' to 'American Gods': Welcome to the Golden Age of Weird TV
An FBI agent communicates with an eyeless woman on some cosmic, supernatural plain while a brain on a stalk issues cryptic orders. A living Goddess swallows a grown man into her vagina while in the middle of sexual intercourse. An international-waters orgy climaxes with a priest nearly forced to fornicate with a fake lioness, not long after tying up a man who claims to be God. A lounge-lizard who lives in a luxury igloo (technically, he resides in some sort of psychic limbo) swills cocktails and sprouts beat poetry. And
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Emmy Quickie: ‘The Oa’ Star Jason Isaacs Has No Idea If He’s in Season 2 (Video)

Emmy Quickie: ‘The Oa’ Star Jason Isaacs Has No Idea If He’s in Season 2 (Video)
The Oa” was one of Netflix’s most mysterious original series from the very beginning, with just one cagey trailer released days before the entire first season was released. Viewers were given little information about Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij’s sci-fi mystery beforehand, and were forced to watch all eight episodes if they wanted answers. Though “answers” may be a generous way to describe “The Oa’s” puzzling, if emotionally satisfying, conclusion. Jason Isaacs, who plays the villainous scientist who imprisons Marling’s character, says he’s been bombarded with fan theories since the show premiered. But as much
See full article at The Wrap »

‘The Oa’ Production Designer Alex Digerlando On Utility In Imperfection & Designing Hap’s Deathly Drowning Rig

An Emmy-nominated production designer responsible for Todd SolondzDark Horse, the Oscar-nominated Beasts of the Southern Wild, and the first two seasons of True Detective, Alex Digerlando has established himself as an artist of tremendous versatility, working consistently alongside industry auteurs and the most exciting voices emerging from the world of independent film. The creators of Netflix original series The Oa, Zal Batmanglij and Brit Marling are among the latter…
See full article at Deadline TV »

Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation.
See full article at Indiewire »

Awards Race Disruption: Why ‘Get Out’ and Netflix Can Afford to Rewrite the Rules

Isn’t May a little early to launch an Oscar campaign? Not anymore. These days, it seems old rules don’t apply. On Tuesday evening, Universal marketing turned its “Get Out” DVD launch party into an ad-hoc awards event, inviting awards journalists to its Wisteria Lane backlot to celebrate Jordan Peele’s horror comedy about suburbia gone very wrong.

At $174 million to date (and an expected $50 million bonus rolling out overseas), “Get Out” is Blumhouse horror producer Jason Blum’s highest-grossing film (and his second Oscar contender, after “Whiplash”). And no one is more surprised to be in the awards conversation than breakout writer-director Peele, who is developing seven more original ideas for his new Universal first-look deal. Chances are, he’ll get more than $4.5 million to make them.

Being in any awards race is “a little surreal to me,” Peele told me. “I have a hard time accepting that’s part of the conversation.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Peak TV Treasure: The Oa

Peak TV Treasure: The Oa
Are you overwhelmed by how much television is available right now? Is life getting in the way of keeping up with the shows you wanna try out? We feel your tube-related pain. Here’s a handy feature that’ll help you locate the hidden gems in this era of Peak TV.

The Oa

Network | Netflix

Created By | Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij

Number Of Episodes | 8

Episode Length | 60 mins.

Premise | Marling (of the British miniseries Babylon) stars as Prairie Johnson, a young woman who went missing years ago as a blind girl, but returns to the community she grew up in with her sight inexplicably restored.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Film Review: ‘Tomorrow Ever After’

Film Review: ‘Tomorrow Ever After’
If Hollywood were a character in one of its own movies, it would be the wild-eyed doomsayer wearing a sandwich board that reads, “The End Is Nigh!” How else to interpret the astonishing number of dark, post-apocalyptic stories being told these days? By contrast, upbeat indie filmmaker Ela Thier actually does appear in her own movies, and she has a far more positive take on where things are headed. As a stranded time-traveler in “Tomorrow Ever After,” Thier plays a woman who comes from a much better place — namely, the year 2592 — and she uses the high-concept, low-budget feature to suggest a far more optimistic fate for the human race.

Just as the recent election divided voters into two camps — those determined to make Americn great again, and those who object to the idea that it isn’t great already — it’s all a matter of perspective, really. “The Handmaid’s
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Twin Peaks’ and Beyond: The Best Shows Inspired by David Lynch’s TV Phenomenon

‘Twin Peaks’ and Beyond: The Best Shows Inspired by David Lynch’s TV Phenomenon
It’s been more than 25 years since “Twin Peaks” first rocked ABC’s airwaves with the question of “Who killed Laura Palmer?” and made it clear that David Lynch was a master of television as well as film. While the auteur is returning with a revival series that picks up a quarter-century after the events of the original, we don’t have to only watch Showtime to get that “Twin Peaks” vibe.

Although the series only ran two seasons, the show has influenced countless of TV shows. The most obvious homages feature a central murder mystery that unearths the sordid underbelly of a small town. Wonderfully bizarre characters and dreamy, borderline nightmarish elements may also be hallmarks of a Lynchian homage.

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: How David Lynch Kept Details of the Year’s Biggest Revival a Secret Even From His Own Cast

Most recently, The CW’s “Riverdale
See full article at Indiewire »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites