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2016 | 2015 | 2013 | 2011

17 items from 2016


New to Streaming: ‘Don’t Think Twice,’ ‘Green Room,’ ‘Burn After Reading,’ and More

18 November 2016 8:00 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Amour Fou (Jessica Hausner)

An ecstatically original work of film-history-philosophy with a digital-cinema palette of acutely crafted compositions. Amour Fou seamlessly blends together the paintings of Vermeer, the acting of Bresson, and the psychological undercurrents of a Dostoevsky novel. It is an intensely thrilling and often slyly comic work that manages to combine a passionately dispassionate love story of the highest order with a larger socio-historical examination of a new era of freedom, »

- The Film Stage

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7 Films New to Netflix to Watch In November 2016, Including ‘Boyhood’ and ‘The Jungle Book’

20 October 2016 12:15 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Next month, Netflix has a wide variety of films — modern to classic, animated to live action, Oscar winners to romantic comedies — and we’ve picked seven that you should watch once they’re made available on the streaming service. Enjoy.

1. “Under the Sun” (available November 11)

Directed by Vitaly Manski, the documentary follows a year in the life of a family in Pyongyang, North Korea as their eight-year-old daughter, Zin-mi, prepares to join the Korean Children’s Union on the Day of the Shining Star.

2. “The Ivory Game” (available November 14)

Directed by Kief Davidson and Richard Ladkani and produced by Leonardo DiCaprio, the documentary sheds a light on the seedy underbelly of elephant poaching in Africa and black market ivory trading in China.

Read More: ‘The Ivory Game,’ Produced By Leonardo DiCaprio, Is a Shocking Look at an Underground Marketplace — Telluride Review

3. “Just Friends” (available November 14)

On a lighter note, who »

- Liz Calvario

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The Arts Arena Announces ‘American Fringe’ Lineup for Festival d’Automne

27 September 2016 3:44 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“American Fringe: A New Look at American Independent Cinema” will officially launch this November as part of the Festival d’Automne. This new film series, which will take place from November 25 to November 27, will screen eight recent American independent feature films that collectively and individually capture the irreverence and innovation that have always been at the heart of that movement.

Produced by The Arts Arena, a Parisian nonprofit initiative in the visual arts, performing arts, film and issues of culture and society, the organization has just announced the lineup.

Read More: Parisian Arts Initiative Launching ‘American Fringe’ Film Series in 2016

Organized and selected by Richard Peña, Director Emeritus of the New York Film Festival, and Alessia Palanti, the duo know that recently there has been an enormous growth in the number of indie films and documentaries created. With “American Fringe” they hope to celebrate a slew of works that still »

- Liz Calvario

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New to Streaming: ‘The Shallows,’ ‘Hunt For the Wilderpeople,’ ‘Other People,’ and More

16 September 2016 9:34 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Dormant Beauty (Marco Bellocchio)

The newest film by Marco Bellocchio, one of Italy’s most revered directors, Dormant Beauty, initially seems like a risky proposition, being that it intends to marry both the often over-stuffed ensemble drama subgenre and what’s essentially an “issue” film. The exact fear being that the narrative would strain in a series of contrivances while also mass sermonizing. And yet, while the film still »

- The Film Stage

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What Was The Best Film Of Summer 2016? — IndieWire Critics Survey

22 August 2016 8:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, the CriticWire Survey asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday morning. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?” can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: What was the best film of summer 2016?

Charles Bramesco (@intothecrevasse), Rolling Stone

Gosh, where to start! It’s been a banner summer if, like me, you enjoy submerging yourself in vast unending ocean of incomprehensible bullshit at the movies. There was “Suicide Squad,” which is to plot structure what the Elephant Man is to facial bone structure. Loved me some “X-Men: Apocalypse,” an epic battle between an uncomfortable-looking ensemble of interesting-to-talented actors and a script intent on turning them all into cardboard cutouts. “The Shallows” was fun in the way that completing the maze on the back of a cereal box is fun, »

- David Ehrlich

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‘Men Go to Battle’ Filmmakers on How You Can Make a Huge Period Piece on a Tiny Budget

15 July 2016 3:14 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

If summer is a time for big-budget extravaganzas chock full of movie stars, “Men Go to Battle” might be the ultimate counter-programming: a tiny indie about two brothers in Kentucky struggling with different ideas about what to do with the inhospitable plot of land they’d been bequeathed. But “Men Go to Battle,” from first-time director Zachary Treitz, is an anomaly in the extra-low-budget indie world, too, because it’s a period piece that goes to great pains to recreate the first years of the Civil War. The idea, said Treitz of the film that premiered at last year’s Tribeca Film Festival. »

- Steve Pond

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‘Men Go To Battle’ Is A Quietly Resonant Cinematic Experience [Review]

8 July 2016 2:10 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Zachary Treitz and Kate Lyn Sheil’s “Men Go To Battle” sets its story in the 1860s, treating the Civil War period as a background prop on a miniscule stage, in an intimate and muted story about two brothers. It’s a film that would make for an attention-grabbing double bill with “The Keeping Room” (coming to […]

The post ‘Men Go To Battle’ Is A Quietly Resonant Cinematic Experience [Review] appeared first on The Playlist. »

- Nikola Grozdanovic

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Film Guide: What Movie Should I Watch This Weekend? (July 8, 2016)

8 July 2016 12:23 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

To help sift through the increasing number of new releases (independent or otherwise), the Weekly Film Guide is here! Below you’ll find basic plot, personnel and cinema information for all of this week’s fresh offerings.

Starting this month, we’ve also put together a list for the entire month. We’ve included this week’s list below, complete with information on screening locations for films in limited release.

See More: Here Are All the Upcoming Movies in Theaters for July 2016

Here are the films opening theatrically in the U.S. the week of Friday, July 8. All synopses provided by distributor unless listed otherwise.

Wide 

Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates

Director: Jake Szymanski

Cast: Adam DeVine, Anna Kendrick, Aubrey Plaza, Zac Efron

Synopsis: Two brothers place an online ad to find dates for a wedding and the ad goes viral.

The Secret Life of Pets

Director: Chris Renaud, »

- Steve Greene

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Separation Anxiety: Men Go to Battle

8 July 2016 11:31 AM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

The lives of the young, illiterate Mellon brothers, Henry (Tim Morton) and Francis (David Maloney), whose world barely extends beyond their small, unproductive farm in Small’s Corner, Kentucky, might seem historically insignificant compared to the monumental events transpiring in their own backyard in 1861. The magic — I use the word loosely because the film is cloaked in such an original isomorph of naturalism — of director Zachary Treitz’s Men Go to Battle lies in its equal treatment of the two strands. The filmmaker tailors the aesthetic to his purposes, noting with a hint of sarcasm to The L Magazine, […] »

- Howard Feinstein

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Film Review: ‘Men Go to Battle’

7 July 2016 5:28 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Men Go to Battle” presents mid-19th-century American life as a series of constant, arduous struggles, be they at home or on the battlefield. First-time helmer Zachary Treitz’s assured Civil War saga (which earned him an emerging director prize at the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival) is a haunting, mournful mood piece about two brothers whose close-knit relationship frays under the strain of proximity, personal and financial disappointments, and the arrival of the Union army. Striking in its evocation of a demanding time and place, this intimate drama about individual and national transformation heralds the arrival of an arresting new filmmaking voice, and should cast a spell when it settles into limited theatrical release this July.

Scruffy, red-bearded Henry (Tim Morton) and lanky Francis (David Maloney) are brothers cohabitating in a ramshackle family farm in the backwoods province of Small’s Corner, Ken., in 1861. That homestead includes dozens of acres of »

- Nick Schager

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‘Men Go To Battle’: How To Recreate The Civil War With No Money

7 July 2016 2:38 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Built into the independent, Civil War-set feature “Men Go To Battle” was an inherent production challenge: How do you recreate the Civil War on a micro-budget? Director Zachary Treitz had always known to pull it off he’d need to lean on the historical reenactment of the Battle of Perryville.

“Because it was the 150th Anniversary of Perryville, Civil War reenactors were having a national event, which meant instead of having hundreds, they had thousands of men and women replaying the events of the key battle,” Treitz told IndieWire in a recent interview.

Treitz lobbied the reenactment leaders for months to convince them to allow filming, but there was concern the filmmakers would interfere with the allusion of re-living the events.

Read More: James Franco’s Movie Column: Civil War Meets Mumblecore in ‘Men Go To Battle

“These are men who sleep on the ground in rainy 30 degree weather and »

- Chris O'Falt

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‘Men Go To Battle’: How To Shoot a Period Piece Indie

6 July 2016 2:10 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Editor’s Note: “Men Go To Battle” is not your normal micro-budget independent film. The story of two Kentucky brothers set against the backdrop of Civil War is a perfect example of how resourceful low budget filmmakers can be, as director Zachary Treitz and his small band of collaborators creates a vibrant and credible-looking period drama. The film is much more than an inventive recreation of period, it is also an exercise in taking a modern approach to story and filmmaking to cut through the layers of historical embellishment to make a direct and intimate film that is as relatable as any set in 2016.

In the first of a series of articles about the film, cinematographer Brett Jutkiewicz talks about how he approached shooting “Men” and how he tackled the challenge of shooting in the low light, pre-electricity world of 1861.

Read More: How To Make a Period-Set Feature Film For »

- Chris O'Falt

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Watch: Official Trailer for Indie Civil War Drama 'Men Go to Battle'

3 May 2016 5:45 PM, PDT | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

"This war might last longer than me..." Film Movement has debuted a trailer for the indie drama Men Go to Battle, about the story of two brothers during the American Civil War. This is kind of the opposite of Free State of Jones, another Civil War movie due this year, with more of a mumblecore vibe and it even has a darkly comedic side - though that's hard to tell. The cast includes Timothy Morton, Charlotte Arnold, Steve Coulter, Samantha Jacober, Rachel Korine, David Maloney, Emily Cass McDonnell. The film follows two brothers trying to keep their crumbling estate together outside a Kentucky town. Have fun. Here's the first trailer (+ poster) for Zachary Treitz's Men Go to Battle, from YouTube (via Tfs): Official synopsis: Kentucky, 1861. Francis and Henry Mellon depend on each other to keep their unkempt estate afloat as winter encroaches. After Francis takes a casual fight too far, »

- Alex Billington

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Trailer Watch: Zachary Treitz and Kate Lyn Sheil’s Independent Civil War Drama, Men Go to Battle

3 May 2016 1:04 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

Written by Zachary Treitz and Kate Lyn Sheil, and directed by Treitz, Men Go to Battle is an ambitious independent historical drama that tells the story of two quarreling brothers whose back-and-forth are interrupted by the Civil War. Here’s how the filmmakers synopsize the film, which stars Tim Morton, David Maloney and, from Spring Breakers, Rachel Korine: While most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, Henry (Tim Morton) and Francis Mellon (David Maloney) are more concerned about braving another winter on their struggling rural Kentucky farm. The brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis’ practical jokes become […] »

- Scott Macaulay

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‘Men Go to Battle’ in First Trailer For Acclaimed Civil War Drama

3 May 2016 12:03 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

If Matthew McConaughey‘s Civil War drama Free State of Jones (or even Civil War) aren’t your cup of tea this summer, we can recommend a more grounded experience from the era with Men Go to Battle. The directorial debut from Zachary Trietz follows two brothers who find themselves facing an approaching war. Premiering back at Tribeca Film Festival last year, it’ll now get a release this summer and the first trailer has landed.

We said in our review, “Mumblecore and the period drama have (somehow) come together, and the result is far better than people who are generally allergic to the subgenre may expect. On a minuscule budget, writer-director Zachary Treitz and his crew have laid out a fully realized recreation of the South during the American Civil War — and it’s more than convincing recreations of an era’s aesthetic. Where many historical films are concerned »

- Leonard Pearce

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Exclusive: First Poster For Indie ‘Men Go To Battle’ Starring Tim Morton And Kate Lyn Sheil

3 March 2016 8:00 AM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

There’s always a discovery to be found in every Tribeca Film Festival line-up and one of the indies that broke out last year was “Men Go To Battle.” The directorial debut of Zachary Treitz, “Men Go To Battle” is a micro-budgeted Civil War era film that stars Tim Morton, David Maloney, Rachel Korine, Steve Coulter and Kate Lyn Sheil (“House Of Cards,” the upcoming “The Girlfriend Experience”) who co-wrote the movie with its director. The indie centers on two brothers struggling to hold their crumbling estate together outside a small Kentucky town in the fall of 1861. Here’s the official synopsis: Most Americans predict that the Civil War will end by Christmas, but Henry (Tim Morton) and Francis Mellon (David Maloney) couldn't care less. Bracing for another winter on their struggling farm in rural Kentucky, the brothers have become suffocatingly close. Francis' practical jokes become more and more aggressive »

- Edward Davis

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The Top 30 Debut Films of 2015

18 January 2016 1:04 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

There’s a certain joy to be felt when discovering a new voice in film. Taking the risk to sit down in and watch a director’s first feature, witnessing how they grapple and contend with cinema. Each year, there are great debuts, to be sure, but in 2015, it seemed to me to be unusually strong for first-time filmmakers (not a few films listed here are on my overall best of the year list as well).

A few notes regarding the eligibility: the majority of these films had a USA theatrical release date in 2015, but in the spirit of including more foreign films – some of which have yet to find a distributor in North America – I have also included several films which only had festival release dates in 2015, or only had theatrical releases in their country of origin. The question of which films are eligible seems to be an arbitrary line, »

- Josh Hamm

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2016 | 2015 | 2013 | 2011

17 items from 2016


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