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1-20 of 54 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Jude Law Needs Fewer Soulless Blockbusters and More Iconoclasts Like Paolo Sorrentino’s ‘The Young Pope’

19 June 2017 11:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jude Law, who’s always been hard to pin down, and his title role in HBO Emmy Contender “The Young Pope” is no exception. 

Bottom Line: As he embraces his mid-40s, Jude Law has morphed from British golden boy to globally bankable character actor. His range is wide, from tragic robot Gigolo Joe in Steven Spielberg’s “A.I.” to Robert Downey, Jr.’s comedy sidekick Dr. Watson in Guy Ritchie’s blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes” franchise. Still stunningly handsome, Law is gaining grit and gravitas as he gets older. But there’s a sense he’s still holding back.

Latest Misfires: Law took on evil power-monger Vortigern opposite Charlie Hunnam as Arthur in Ritchie’s attempt to similarly update “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Young Pope’: How Jude Law Went Weird with Paolo Sorrentino for His Best Work In Years

19 June 2017 11:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jude Law, who’s always been hard to pin down, and his title role in HBO Emmy Contender “The Young Pope” is no exception. 

Bottom Line: As he embraces his mid-40s, Jude Law has morphed from British golden boy to globally bankable character actor. His range is wide, from tragic robot Gigolo Joe in Steven Spielberg’s “A.I.” to Robert Downey, Jr.’s comedy sidekick Dr. Watson in Guy Ritchie’s blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes” franchise. Still stunningly handsome, Law is gaining grit and gravitas as he gets older. But there’s a sense he’s still holding back.

Latest Misfires: Law took on evil power-monger Vortigern opposite Charlie Hunnam as Arthur in Ritchie’s attempt to similarly update “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword, »

- Anne Thompson

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‘The Young Pope’: How Jude Law Went Weird with Paolo Sorrentino for His Best Work In Years

19 June 2017 11:03 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jude Law, who’s always been hard to pin down, and his title role in HBO Emmy Contender “The Young Pope” is no exception. 

Bottom Line: As he embraces his mid-40s, Jude Law has morphed from British golden boy to globally bankable character actor. His range is wide, from tragic robot Gigolo Joe in Steven Spielberg’s “A.I.” to Robert Downey, Jr.’s comedy sidekick Dr. Watson in Guy Ritchie’s blockbuster “Sherlock Holmes” franchise. Still stunningly handsome, Law is gaining grit and gravitas as he gets older. But there’s a sense he’s still holding back.

Latest Misfires: Law took on evil power-monger Vortigern opposite Charlie Hunnam as Arthur in Ritchie’s attempt to similarly update “King Arthur: Legend of the Sword,” which went down in flames with both critics and audiences. Law was the best thing in the $150-million Warner Bros. write-off, which short-circuited on anachronistic over-pixellation. Another recent disappointment was literary biopic “Genius,” in which Law scenery-chewed as volatile writer Thomas Wolfe.

Career Peaks: The child of two teachers, Law earned a Tony nomination for his first Broadway appearance opposite Kathleen Turner in the London import “Indiscretions,” and a second for the title role in “Hamlet.” Law earned a 1999 Supporting Actor nomination for Anthony Minghella’s “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” perfectly cast as the effortlessly charismatic European golden boy Dickie Greenleaf, adored by his girlfriend (Gwyneth Paltrow) and both idolized and resented by his wannabe best friend Tom Ripley (Matt Damon). The next year, Law went American and scored a Best Actor nomination in the director’s “Cold Mountain” as a Civil War soldier who deserts the Confederacy to make the long walk home to his long-suffering wife (Nicole Kidman).

Read More: 10 TV Shows Emmy Voters Need to Watch Before They Fill Out Their Ballots

Law revealed his darker side in Sam Mendes’ “Road to Perdition” as creepily morbid photographer Maguire. He cameoed as matinee idol Errol Flynn in Martin Scorsese’s “The Aviator,” and played the loving inventor father in “Hugo.” He let his hair grow thin as the cuckolded Karenin in Joe Wright’s “Anna Karenina,” bringing empathy to the role.

Latest award contender: Law broadened his fanbase by producing, with Paolo Sorrentino, the outrageous HBO drama series “The Young Pope,” in which he headlines as Archbishop of New York Lenny Belardo, who in a surprise Vatican conclave vote becomes Pontiff Pope Pious Xiii. In the juiciest, most difficult role of his career, Law plays a brash New Yorker in spiritual crisis as a radically conservative Pope who believes that remaining shrouded in mystery is the source of his strength. But he is tested along the way, as he challenges his closest confederates, from scheming Cardinals to nurturing Sister Mary (Diane Keaton), who raised him and best friend Cardinal Dussolier (Scott Shepherd) in an orphanage. Pious resists temptations thrown his way and successfully prays for a devout young woman (Ludivine Sagnier) to conceive a child, but drives others deep into the abyss.

Law made the leap into premium television with Oscar-winning Italian filmmaker Sorrentino (“The Great Beauty”) based only on the concept. “I had an idea of the overall world and character,” he said in a telephone interview from London. “Then we met. That was it. And he started writing. He puts it all the page: the mood, the music, even some of the visuals were there, and the humor, certainly.”

What Sorrentino wants, Sorrentino gets, said Law, who trusted his director: “It’s the same with all these big-personality writer-directors and creators. If you get on board, you want their whole input; you can’t take them in another direction. It’s clear from the get-go where they want to go. I knew the interpretive element spaces in the script were going to be filled and padded out by Paolo, who is a director who tells stories with a visual eye to the way he edits and constructs the story. His point of view is very present with where he puts the camera and how it moves, which points the whole drama in another direction, and adds irony or humor not there on the page.”

Law wrote himself a road map for his character “with a clear sense of the constructed inner workings of Lenny as a child up to the man you meet in the beginning of Episode One,” he said. “I was clear about how he used his ambiguities and contradictions at times to manipulate, and where his own self-doubt and questions lay.

“Lenny’s relishing the position he’s in, the opportunity to get some answers and also to settle into this position of power,” he said. “He doesn’t take it lightly. From great power comes great stillness and introspection. He believes in the moment in what he’s saying, but that may change. The most important journey he goes on is when he acknowledges his change of opinion on homosexuality in the last episode. It’s refreshing to have a character saying ‘I was wrong.'”

Law had an understanding of this orphan pope’s longing to find his parents. “It was close to my heart,” he said, “as both of my parents were orphans. So I had years of discussion and analysis and understanding of what that’s like and what it can do. Both of my folks are well-rounded and sound, loving human beings, but they come from complicated backgrounds, so I feel a kinship with Lenny in that way.”

While the extravagantly theatrical Pontiff costumes were reality based and Vatican tailors made the clothes, said Law, “Lenny chooses at the height of his process to delve into the Medieval ritual costumes of the Catholic Church. Costumes always help to create a character, and wearing those robes adds a whole other level.”

Law said his shift from movie to television actor was a struggle, as Sorrentino was shooting 10 episodes at  Rome’s Cinecitta, with a multi-lingual crew, out of sequence. “You plan where you have been going and go back to rereading what you’ve done to keep up with where you are,” Law said. “I underestimated how hard-wired I was to the two-hour story — two months in we were a quarter of the way through, when I’d usually be thinking about the ending.”

Biggest Problem: Law is less a Hollywood marquee draw than a reliable chameleon, and is often wasted in such foreign-driven formula action fare as “Repo Men.”

Assets: The actor can be muscular and dangerous, or fey and complex. He’s capable of heroism (“Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow,” “Enemy at the Gates,” “Black Sea”) and villainy (“I Heart Huckabees,” “King Arthur”). He can do comedy (“Spy,” “The Grand Budapest Hotel”), tragedy (“Anna Karenina,” “Closer”), romance (“The Holiday”), big-budget studio adventure (“Sherlock Holmes”), and costume drama (“Genius”), and is ready to grow and change as he ages.

Current Gossip: Law has sired five children with three partners — the first three with his ex-wife Sadie Frost, who engaged him in a protracted custody battle when they divorced in 2003. He was on and off again with his “Alfie” co-star Sienna Miller, and briefly dated actress Ruth Wilson; his latest girlfriend is psychologist Phillipa Coan.

Next Step: He’s taking on younger Angus Dumbledore in the next “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them,” as well as another franchise turn as Dr. Watson. And Law is willing to juggle his busy schedule to shoot Season Two of “The Young Pope.” “We’re still trying to work out what it is, to be honest,” Law said. “To make a 20-hour film with Paolo is how I saw it. What’s important is to go out and nail what he had in mind. I feel we did that. Paolo’s written a fantastic idea of the evolution of all the characters, and I’m confident there’s a little bit more of Lenny to show. I don’t know that I want to play him for the rest of my life. You‘d have to call him the old pope!”

Career Advice: Law should continue to seek artistic challenges where they come, whether theater, film or television, and accept fewer big-studio action vehicles like submarine adventure “Black Sea” and more demanding character work like “The Young Pope.” Law’s mystery is an asset — we want to tap into more of him.

Related stories'The Handmaid's Tale': Finding Lenses (and Cameras) to Create the Unfamiliar World of Gilead'Game of Thrones': 7 Things You May Have Missed From the New Season 7 TrailerHow TV Critics Began To Have a Bigger Impact on the Emmy Race -- Screen Talk Emmy Podcast »

- Anne Thompson

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The 25 Best TV Theme Songs of the 21st Century, Ranked

13 June 2017 9:32 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Amidst the chorus of people saying that TV is better than it’s ever been, you’ll always find one person lamenting the decline of the theme song. While it’s true that the days of minutes-long intros with original songs and catchy melodies might be in the past, there’s no denying that shows are still finding memorable (and in a few cases, iconic) ways to open each episode.

Read More: The 20 Best Animated TV Shows of the 21st Century, Ranked

With that in mind, we set out to pick the best TV themes of the young century. Some of these are snippets from existing songs, others are new instrumentals that have quickly taken on meaning well beyond the shows they’re attached to. As DVRs and streaming services make it easier than ever to skip TV credits, there are plenty of songs and shows trying to keep the art of the opening alive. »

- Steve Greene and Michael Schneider

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The 25 Best TV Theme Songs of the 21st Century, Ranked

13 June 2017 9:32 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Amidst the chorus of people saying that TV is better than it’s ever been, you’ll always find one person lamenting the decline of the theme song. While it’s true that the days of minutes-long intros with original songs and catchy melodies might be in the past, there’s no denying that shows are still finding memorable (and in a few cases, iconic) ways to open each episode.

Read More: The 20 Best Animated TV Shows of the 21st Century, Ranked

With that in mind, we set out to pick the best TV themes of the young century. Some of these are snippets from existing songs, others are new instrumentals that have quickly taken on meaning well beyond the shows they’re attached to. As DVRs and streaming services make it easier than ever to skip TV credits, there are plenty of songs and shows trying to keep the art of the opening alive. »

- Steve Greene and Michael Schneider

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Luther Season 5 Is A Go With Idris Elba Back On Board To Play The Gruff Detective

12 June 2017 9:09 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Luther fans, rejoice! The BBC has today confirmed that Idris Elba’s gruff detective will don that signature tweed coat once again for an “utterly heart-stopping and unmissable” four-part season.

That’s right, Luther season 5 is a go, and it’ll herald John Luther’s first small-screen appearance since December of 2015. Granted, Elba has since reprised as the iconic sleuth, specifically for last year’s Sport Relief sketch, but with the show’s co-creator and writer Neil Cross also on board, fans will no doubt be looking to this all-new fifth installment with bated breath.

Filming is due to commence sometime next year, which would put Luther‘s fifth season on course for a late 2018 premiere. Whatever the case (see what we did there?), Elba’s husky-voiced detective was last seen tackling crime opposite DS Emma Lane (Rose Leslie), and with no mention of casting at this early, early stage, »

- Michael Briers

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Emmy Contenders 2017: Lead Actress in a Drama

1 June 2017 12:00 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

With last year’s winner Tatiana Maslany (“Orphan Black”) ineligible this year, a spot opened for a new victor to be crowned. Odds are on Claire Foy, who won both Golden Globe and SAG awards this year for her portrait of young Queen Elizabeth II in “The Crown.” She could face stiff competition from new contenders Mandy Moore, whose done great work on new show “This Is Us,” and Evan Rachel Wood, who stars as a very human android in “Westworld.” Also debuting this year was “The Handmaid’s Tale,” a showcase for Elisabeth Moss’ talent. With seven previous noms, Moss has never won. Likely to repeat their nominations from last year are Viola Davis (“How to Get Away With Murder”) and Claire Danes (“Homeland”) both of whom have won for their characters before. Robin Wright (“House of Cards”), Taraji P. Henson (“Empire”) and Keri Russell (“The Americans”) were all nominated last year as well, and »

- Variety Staff

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Film Acquisition Rundown: Focus Buys ‘The Little Stranger,’ Oscilloscope Picks Up ‘Brimstone & Glory’ and More

26 May 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Keep up with the wild and wooly world of indie film acquisitions with our weekly Rundown of everything that’s been picked up around the globe. Check out last week’s Rundown here.

Focus Features has acquired the worldwide rights to “The Little Stranger,” excluding the U.K., France and Switzerland, where it will be distributed by Pathé. Academy Award nominee Lenny Abrahamson (“Room”) will direct the film, a chilling ghost story, which will begin production in the U.K. this summer for release in 2018. “The Little Stranger” will star Academy Award nominee Charlotte Rampling, Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter. Lucinda Coxon, who wrote the screenplay adaptation of Focus’ “The Danish Girl,” has adapted “The Little Stranger” from Sarah Waters’ acclaimed 2009 novel of the same name.

In a remote English village after the close of World War II, a local practitioner, Dr. Faraday (Gleeson), is called to the »

- Graham Winfrey

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Lenny Abrahamson’s ghost story The Little Stranger picked up by Focus Features

24 May 2017 9:50 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Focus Features has announced that it has picked up the rights to The Little Stranger, the next film from Room director Lenny Abrahamson, which has been scripted by Lucinda Coxton (The Danish Girl). Described as “a chilling ghost story”, the film will star Domhnall Gleeson (Star Wars: The Last Jedi), Charlotte Rampling (Assassin’s Creed), Ruth Wilson (The Affair) and Will Poulter (The Revenant).

According to Deadline, the film takes place in post-World War II Britain “where a doctor (Gleeson) revisits a crumbling great house called Hundreds Halls where his mother once worked as a nurse maid. The owners are losing the house because they can’t afford the taxes, even though they say the home is haunted by the malevolent ghost of their mother’s first-born daughter. The doctor becomes obsessed with marrying one of the owner’s daughters (Wilson), and bad things happen.”

Production on The Little Stranger »

- Gary Collinson

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Cannes: Gurinder Chadha, Paolo Sorrentino, Dany Boon Films Score Deals for Pathe (Exclusive)

24 May 2017 6:16 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

IFC has picked up Gurinder Chadha’s “Viceroy House,” starring Hugh Bonneville and Gillian Anderson, from Pathe for U.S. release. The historic drama premiered at the Berlin Film Festival and the deal was announced in Cannes.

Pathe also clinched a raft of deals on Paolo Sorrentino’s anticipated “Loro” and “Dany Boon’s “La Ch’tite Famille,” which, along with Lenny Abrahamson’s “The Little Stranger,” are part of Pathe’s strong slate at Cannes film market.

Sorrentino’s anticipated “Loro”, in which Toni Servillo will star as Italian media tycoon-turned-prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, was pre-sold to Germany (Dcm), Spain (Dea Planeta), Benelux (Belga), Poland (Gutek), Greece (Feelgood), Cis (Aone), Czech Republic and Slovakia (Aero films), Ex Yougoslavia(McF), Hungary (Mozinet) and Israel (Lev). Pathé will distribute “Loro” in France and Switzerland. Production will kick off in July.

Meanwhile, “La Ch’tite Famille,” the latest film by French comedy expert Boon, »

- Elsa Keslassy

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Cannes: 'Room' Director Lenny Abrahamson to Tackle Ghost Story for Focus

23 May 2017 8:52 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Focus Features has acquired worldwide rights to Lenny Abrahamson’s The Little Stranger, except for the U.K., France and Switzerland, where it will be distributed by Pathé. 

The new film from the Oscar-nominated director of Room is a ghost story that will star Charlotte Rampling, Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter. It begins shooting this summer in the U.K. for release in 2018. Lucinda Coxon, who wrote the screenplay adaptation of Focus’ The Danish Girl, has adapted The Little Stranger from Sarah Waters’ 2009 novel of the same name. Set in a remote English village after World War II, the film revolves around »

- Gregg Kilday

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Focus picks up Lenny Abrahamson, Domhnall Gleeson ghost story 'The Little Stranger'

23 May 2017 8:35 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Production scheduled for this summer in the UK.

Focus Features has picked up worldwide rights to Lenny Abrahamson’s upcoming The Little Stranger, starring Charlotte Rampling, Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter.

The deal excludes the UK, France and Switzerland, where Pathé will distribute.

Abrahamson, who earned a best directing Oscar nomination for Room, will direct the ghost story this summer in the UK in time for a 2018 release.

The Little Stranger takes place in a remote English village after the end of the Second World War as a doctor attends to an ailing parlourmaid at a family estate haunted by a malevolent ghost.

Lucinda Coxon, who adapted The Danish Girl for Focus, adapted The Little Stranger from Sarah Waters’ novel of the same name.

The Little Stranger is a Focus Features, Pathé, and Film4 presentation in association with Ingenious Media and the Irish Film Board of a Potboiler production in association with Element Pictures.

[link »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Focus acquires worldwide rights to 'The Little Stranger'

23 May 2017 8:35 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Production scheduled for this summer in the UK.

Focus Features has picked up worldwide rights to Lenny Abrahamson’s upcoming The Little Stranger, starring Charlotte Rampling, Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter.

The deal excludes the UK, France and Switzerland, where Pathé will distribute.

Abrahamson, who earned a best directing Oscar nomination for Room, will direct the ghost story this summer in the UK in time for a 2018 release.

The Little Stranger takes place in a remote English village after the end of the Second World War as a doctor attends to an ailing parlourmaid at a family estate haunted by a malevolent ghost.

Lucinda Coxon, who adapted The Danish Girl for Focus, adapted The Little Stranger from Sarah Waters’ novel of the same name.

The Little Stranger is a Focus Features, Pathé, and Film4 presentation in association with Ingenious Media and the Irish Film Board of a Potboiler production in association with Element Pictures.

[link »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Lenny Abrahamson’s ‘Little Stranger’ Lands at Focus

23 May 2017 8:03 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Focus Features has acquired worldwide rights to the ghost story “The Little Stranger,” starring Domhnall Gleeson, Charlotte Rampling, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter with Lenny Abrahamson directing.

Focus, which announced the deal Tuesday at the Cannes Film Festival, said production will begin in the U.K. this summer for a 2018 release. Pathe will handle distribution in the U.K., France and Switzerland.

Abrahamson, who received an Academy Award nomination for “Room,” will direct from a script by Lucinda Coxon, who wrote the screenplay adaptation of Focus’ “The Danish Girl.” Coxon has adapted “The Little Stranger” from Sarah Waters’ 2009 novel of the same name.

The story is set in a remote English village after the close of World War II, when Gleeson’s local practitioner is called to the aged estate of Hundreds Hall to tend to an unwell parlor maid. The resident is also home to Rampling’s glamorous widow and her two grown children, »

- Dave McNary

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Focus Features Acquires Lenny Abrahamson’s ‘The Little Stranger’ – Cannes

23 May 2017 7:42 AM, PDT | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Focus Features has picked up worldwide rights to Lenny Abrahamson's The Little Stranger, excluding the UK, France and Switzerland, where it will be distributed by Pathé. The chilling ghost story, which will begin production in the UK this summer with a planned 2018 release, stars Charlotte Rampling, Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter. Abrahamson, who directed the 2015 Oscar-nominated pic Room, will direct. Lucinda Coxton, who wrote the screenplay adaptation… »

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Lenny Abrahamson’s ‘The Little Stranger’ Acquired by Focus Features

23 May 2017 7:33 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Focus Features has acquired the worldwide rights, excluding the U.K., France and Switzerland, to Lenny Abrahamson’s “The Little Stranger,” chairman Peter Kujawski announced Tuesday. The film is a ghost story, which will begin production in the U.K. this summer and is set for a release in 2018. Charlotte Rampling, Domhnall Gleeson, Ruth Wilson and Will Poulter are set to star. It marks filmmaker’s follow-up to “Room,” which was nominated for best picture and director, and won Brie Larson her best actress Oscar. Lucinda Coxon, who wrote the screenplay adaptation of Focus’ “The Danish Girl,” has adapted “The Little Stranger” from Sarah. »

- Beatrice Verhoeven

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Cannes 2017: How to Talk to Girls at Parties Review

22 May 2017 10:57 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Jo-Ann Titmarsh

There’s been a lot of anticipation for this film by John Cameron Mitchell, who brought us the entertaining Hedwig and the Angry Inch and the sombre and moving Rabbit Hole. Mitchell returns to the punk territory of the former, but unfortunately with less success.

We’re in Croydon in 1977. Punk is at its height and Queen Elizabeth II is celebrating her silver jubilee. This choice of 1977 gives the director plenty of Union Jacks and street parties to set against the iconic Sex Pistols song and record cover, which he uses consistently throughout the film. Our hero is Enn (Alex Sharp): he’s being raised by his single mum, his jazz musician dad having abandoned the family ship years earlier. With his two best mates, the chubby and cerebral John (Ethan Lawrence) and the Billy Idol lookalike Vic (Abraham Lewis), the three schoolboys have embraced punk. »

- Jo-Ann Titmarsh

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New Clips from How to talk to Girls at Parties

21 May 2017 10:33 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

Once upon a time, Neil Gaiman wrote a short piece, How to talk to Girls at Parties, which became a popular and frequently shared piece. It has gone on to be made into a film, starring Elle Fanning, Alex Sharp, Nicole Kidman, Ruth Wilson, and Matt Lucas and is screening this weekend at the Cannes Film Festival. The actual release is this fall but there have been a series of clips have been released and we’re sharing those here.

A funny and unique love story, How to Talk to Girls at Parties focuses on Enn, a shy teenage punk rocker in 1970s suburban London, and his two closest friends, Vic and John.  One night they all sneak into a party where they meet a group of intensely attractive, otherworldly girls; at first they think they’re from a cult, but eventually come to realize the girls are literally from another world—outer space. »

- ComicMix Staff

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‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ Review: Elle Fanning Is a Free Love Alien in John Cameron Mitchell’s Bizarre Return to Form

21 May 2017 5:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Hokey aliens invade the seventies British punk scene in John Cameron Mitchell’s “How to Talk to Girls at Parties,” and the results are not nearly as ridiculous as that sounds — for a while, at least. Channeling the communal intimacy of “Shortbus” and the riotous musicality of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” Mitchell transforms Neil Gaiman’s sci-fi short story into a vibrant, edgy and at times outright goofy statement on tough antiestablishment rebels and freewheeling hippy vibes, suggesting that they’re not really all that that different.

At its center, scrawny, leather-clad punk teen Enn (Alex Sharp) veers across the grimy London suburb of Croydon alongside equally rambunctious pals John (Ethan Lawrence) and Vic (Abraham Lewis), heckling at passersby en route to a noisy concert. As English rockers The Damned blast on the soundtrack, the frame rate gets jagged and the kids seem to content to run wild in »

- Eric Kohn

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First teasers arrive for How To Talk to Girls at Parties, starring Elle Fanning and Nicole Kidman

19 May 2017 4:43 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Scott Davis

The first look has debuted this week for John Cameron Mitchell’s sci-fi film How To Talk to Girls at Parties, with three teaser videos release ahead of its world premiere at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. The film is based on a short story by Neil Gaiman.

How To Talk to Girls… stars Elle Fanning (The Neon Demon, The Beguiled) and Nicole Kidman (Big Little Lies, The Killing of the Sacred Deer) in what is described as a “punk alien love story” and is set to debut this weekend over in Cannes. Ruth Wilson (The Affair) co-stars.

Here’s the synopsis from Cannes:

A story about the birth of punk, the exuberance of first love, and the universe’s greatest mystery of all: how to talk to girls at parties.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties takes audiences to an exotic and unusual world: »

- Scott Davis

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