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Aubrey Plaza Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (2) | Mini Bio (1) | Trade Mark (1) | Trivia (7) | Personal Quotes (36)

Overview (2)

Date of Birth 26 June 1984Wilmington, Delaware, USA
Height 5' 6" (1.68 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Aubrey Plaza was born on June 26, 1984 in Wilmington, Delaware, USA. She is an actress, known for Parks and Recreation (2009), Safety Not Guaranteed (2012) and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (2010).

Trade Mark (1)

Deadpan delivery

Trivia (7)

Plaza had never done stand-up comedy before appearing in and performing stand-up comedy in the movie Funny People (2009).
On March 12, 2010, Plaza performed at 'A Night of 140 Tweets: A Celebrity Tweetathon for Haiti', produced by Rob Huebel, Paul Scheer, Ben Stiller, and Michael J. Rosenstein, at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Los Angeles.
Plaza was named after the song "Aubrey" by the pop/rock group Bread, which was written and composed by David Gates.
In a relationship with Jeff Baena.
One of several internships she had was working in the art department at Saturday Night Live (1975).
She is of Puerto Rican descent from her father's side, and of English and Irish descent on her mother's side.
She makes an appearance as an NBC Page in episode seven of the first season of 30 Rock (2006). Before she was an actress, she actually interned with the NBC Page program.

Personal Quotes (36)

When you improvise, you work off the laughs from the audience, but when you step on stage to do standup, it's silent.
I love great acting, as nerdy as that sounds.
Sarcasm is weird. Even not in acting, in life I feel like 'sarcastic' is a word that people use to describe me sometimes so when I meet someone, it's almost like they feel like they have to also be sarcastic, but it can sometimes just come off as mean if it's not used in the right way.
I'm not super comfortable in my skin. I have to make it work for me, and that usually amounts to making it uncomfortable for everyone else.
A lot of independent films offer a harsh reality check.
I am a Netflix/DVR junkie. I don't like to watch TV without a plan.
I can't say I follow politics extremely closely, but I'm definitely aware of what's going on in the world.
I don't let myself 'surf' on the Web, or I would probably drown.
I get really weird when I'm not working. I have to keep working.
I just want to keep finding special characters that I feel like I can bring to life and characters that are real and not superficial.
I mean, sometimes I hate interviews because I always feel like I sound stupid.
I obviously bring all of my insecurities along with me to any role that I tackle.
I'm not a super emotional person, so that's one reason I love acting - it makes me deal with myself in that kind of way.
I'm not, like, Daniel Day-Lewis. Yet. I will get there!
I'm pretty good at weaseling my way into a job, even if I have no business being there.
I've felt depressed many times in my life, so I can draw on those times in my life when I need to.
If I have the option, I always read the paper or a book or something I can touch and destroy in my own hands.
It's such a thing now, people making fun of other people on the Internet.
Louis C. K. is one of my all time favorite standup comedians.
My grandfather came over from Puerto Rico and raised his kids speaking English so that it would be easier for them to assimilate.
My people would love it if I smiled more, if I was more 'approachable.'
There are always parts of me that come out in the characters that I play - it's the only thing I have to work with and to draw off of.
There's no photo-shoot academy. If there was, I'd probably be kicked out.
Tina Fey is one of my heroes.
Well, I was obsessed with Judy Garland growing up. Like, obsessed.
When I was doing comedy in New York, before I was in movies, I was never known as the deadpan actress. I was just a comedienne.
Writing is hard - writing is the hardest.
I like my name. My mom named me after a song by the 1970s group Bread. So, it's meaningful, and I like the song. It's a love song - kind of - but it's kind of depressing and dark.
I think being on a TV show is amazing but also, people get kind of used to seeing you a certain way and so it becomes a challenge to break free from that in a way.
I would never do a commercial for something that is embarrassing, and I think that people maybe have a different perspective on what is embarrassing or not. Some people think doing a Revlon hair commercial is really cool. To me, that's embarrassing, but World of Warcraft - not embarrassing, very cool.
I'm like that person who hates going to magic shows - and I love magic, I love wizards - but going to a show where there is any possibility of audience participation is a nightmare for me.
I'm totally an anxious mess all the time. There's a constant dialogue going on in my brain, and it's just reminding me of all the failures that I have had, and all of the things I need to do, and all of the things I'm not doing good enough.
When I was in high school I was a really huge 'SNL' fan. I remember the cast around the time I started watching it - Will Ferrell, Ana Gasteyer, Molly Shannon, 'Cheri O'Teri', Tracy Morgan. I did research to find out how people got on the show. Their bios always said they came from an improv team, so I started taking classes.
When I'm on the couch, I usually have the TV on and my MacBook Air nearby. And sometimes, when my ADD is really kicking in, I have my iPad too. And my iPhone. And a magazine that I haven't gotten to. And a book under the pillow to my left.
With stand-up, it doesn't matter who you are. If the audience claps because they love your movies, that clapping stops after five seconds, and then it's your job to make them laugh.
I was a big fan of Winona Ryder in the '90s. I think she's kind of the shit.

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