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Guillermo Del Toro Lists Artistic Influences that Fed 'Crimson Peak'

Guillermo Del Toro Lists Artistic Influences that Fed 'Crimson Peak'
Guillermo del Toro is notoriously inventive, employing a wealth of imagination culled from decades of cinema, art, literature and music that defines the work he delivers to his adoring audiences. Whether or not you're a fan of the Mexican auteur's dark, fantastical offerings, he's a man devoted to the confluence of artistry and craftsmanship and bound by his love for baroque sentimentality and grim depictions of life, love and loss. (Check out @RealGDT's recommendations on Twitter.) Watch: How Cannes and 'Crimson Peak' Changed Guillermo del Toro's Life (Exclusive Video) In a recent interview with The Guardian, Del Toro listed some creative undertakings that helped to shape "Crimson Peak." Among his favored novels, Del Toro lists George Jacobs and William Stadiem's "Mr S: My Life with Frank Sinatra (2003)" as "a ground-level report of almost every conquest, feud or struggle Sinatra went through... You can’t help but feel.
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Guillermo del Toro: the books, TV, films and music that brought me to Crimson Peak

From biographies of Sinatra to minimalist piano pieces, the director reveals the key influences on his work

• Del Toro: ‘I make eye-protein, not eye candy’

Crimson Peak’s visual style

Kim Newman on gothic cinema

George Jacobs and William Stadiem Mr S: My Life with Frank Sinatra (2003)

I’m currently finishing this, my fifth Sinatra biography, which is at once a love poem and a eulogy from Sinatra’s personal valet. You can feel the pained love and care in every single page, and you’ll get a ground-level report of almost every conquest, feud or struggle Sinatra went through. The rare combination of dishy and tender. You can’t help but feel heartache as the book comes to a close.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Guillermo del Toro: the books, TV, films and music that brought me to Crimson Peak

From biographies of Sinatra to minimalist piano pieces, the director reveals the key influences on his work

• Del Toro: ‘I make eye-protein, not eye candy’

Crimson Peak’s visual style

Kim Newman on gothic cinema

George Jacobs and William Stadiem Mr S: My Life with Frank Sinatra (2003)

I’m currently finishing this, my fifth Sinatra biography, which is at once a love poem and a eulogy from Sinatra’s personal valet. You can feel the pained love and care in every single page, and you’ll get a ground-level report of almost every conquest, feud or struggle Sinatra went through. The rare combination of dishy and tender. You can’t help but feel heartache as the book comes to a close.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Frank Sinatra's Former Valet George Jacobs Dies at 87

Frank Sinatra's Former Valet George Jacobs Dies at 87
George Jacobs, who was Frank Sinatra's valet and confidant for 15 years, has died. Jacobs' son, Snake Jagger, says his father died of natural causes in Palm Springs Saturday night. He was 87. Photos: Hollywood's Notable Deaths of 2013 Jacobs was working for Hollywood dealmaker Irving "Swifty" Lazar in 1953 when Sinatra hired and entrusted him with his personal affairs. Jacobs' 2003 book, Mr. S: My Life With Frank Sinatra, gives an insider's look into the crooner's life, his women and his dealings with the Kennedys, the Rat Pack and the mob. Jacobs said he was fired after the gossip

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See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Frank Sinatra's documentary set to be filmed

Frank Sinatra's documentary set to be filmed
New York, Apr . 3: Directors Brett Ratner, Brian Grazer and Graydon Carter are reportedly in talks to team up on an HBO documentary.

According to sources, the project, which is based on the book 'Mr. S: My Life with Frank Sinatra' by the singer's longtime valet George Jacobs, was once slated as a feature for Ratner to direct, starring Chris Tucker, but has now been re-imagined as a TV doc, the New York Post reported.

However, an HBO representative said that no deal has been made with the cable network.

The book by Jacobs and Hollywood biographer William Stadiem was published in 2003 as a behind-the-scenes look at.
See full article at RealBollywood »

Biographer: Frank Sinatra Wasn't Proud of His Big Penis

Frank Sinatra attempted to cover up the fact he was well hung - because he thought the size of his manhood was one of many negatives about his body, according to the late star's new biographer James Kaplan. The journalist spent five years researching his acclaimed new tome, "Frank - The Voice", and reveals Sinatra wasn't like most men, who reveled in the fact he had a big penis.

Recalling a quote from Sinatra's lover Ava Gardner, in which she stated the singer was "only 110 pounds, but 10 pounds of it is c**k!", Kaplan insists Sinatra wasn't proud of his manhood. The writer tells WENN, "I think we can take it as fact that Frank Sinatra was very well-endowed."

"George Jacobs, Sinatra's valet in latter years wrote a wonderful book, called 'Mr. S', and he speaks in the book about the size of Sinatra's manhood and actually having special underwear
See full article at Aceshowbiz »

Sinatra 'Could Have Saved Monroe'

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Sinatra 'Could Have Saved Monroe'
Frank Sinatra could have saved Marilyn Monroe's life - but he threw her out of his home less than two weeks before she died amid fears she'd pass away in his company, according to a new biography.

The Rat Pack star enjoyed an on/off romance with the Some Like It Hot actress until she died from an overdose of barbiturates in 1962.

Leading up to the tragedy, Monroe suffered a number of personal problems and illness - but her passing could have been prevented if Sinatra had intervened after she collapsed at his Cal-Neva Lodge resort in Nevada days before her death.

The Hollywood icon invited Monroe to stay with him at the venue, along with actor Peter Lawford and his wife Pat.

But the holiday turned sour when the fragile-looking actress started taking vitamin shots in front of the other guests, only to later breakdown in her room.

Instead of helping out, Sinatra ordered Monroe to be removed from his estate, according to new book, The Secret Life of Marilyn Monroe.

A security guard for Sinatra's Cal-Neva Lodge tells author J. Randy Taraborrelli, "She opened her purse and pulled out those syringes. I was standing right there with Mr Sinatra and Pat Lawford. Marilyn was very casual about it. She was looking for something else and just pulled them out and put them on the table... Then - and I had never seen anything like this before - she put a small hole at the end of the capsule, and swallowed it. 'Gets into your bloodstream faster that way,' she said."

Valet George Jacobs adds, "Frank Sinatra didn't know what to think about any of it. He was upset, though. He loved Marilyn, yes. But for her to maybe die at Cal-Neva while he was there? That would have been terrible. So he said: 'Get her out of here and get her out of here now.' And that was it. We had to do what he said. I mean, the woman was sick. But as compassionate as Sinatra was, he had a line and she crossed it."

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