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Portrait of the Artist | 2015 Rendez-Vous with French Cinema Review

On My Skin: Barraud Explores the Essence of Monstrosity

There are moments within Antoine Barraud’s sophomore feature Portrait of the Artist that tend to feel enlivened with an arresting strangeness. There is the peripherally entertaining notion of provocative body horror shadowing us while we follow a filmmaker creating his latest project, simultaneously losing his grip on reality. But more often than not, the film feels like a thriller version of Frederick Wiseman’s National Gallery. Barraud’s French language title, Le Dos Rouge (basically The Red Back) was perhaps too literal of a title, and the allusion to Joyce’s classic text (though this is really more ‘as a middle aged man’) gives it a certain extra textual density since Joyce’s novel is an allusion to Daedalus, the man responsible for constructing the Labyrinth which entombed the deadly Minotaur in Greek Mythology.

Bertrand (Bertrand Bonello) is a filmmaker
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

The 20 Best Film Scores of 2014

It’s been a great year for film music. I say that as someone who had to endure the laughably dated qualities of Alberto IglesiasExodus: Gods and Kings and had to swallow the pill that is Howard Shore‘s latter days Middle-earth music.

But it has been a great year. Clint Mansell gave us haunting, complex soundscapes in Noah, the Alexandre Desplat Hive Mind unleashed another five feature-length scores on the planet, and we even got a peak at John Williams‘ forthcoming music in that Star Wars trailer.

So what was the best of the bunch? For simplicity’s sake, I’ve limited this list to movies with U.S. theatrical runs in 2014. When possible, I’ve also linked to our reviews and select cues on Spotify, although you’ll note the occasional YouTube or SoundCloud embed as well. Let’s do this:

20. HornsRobin Coudert

Every few years,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

You And The Night Review

As an English kid born and raised in the raucous glare of soccer, Eric Cantona was a titan. Enigmatic, balletic, and absolutely insane, the gruff Frenchman was a delight to watch on the pitch and frequently bewildering off of it. He seemed capable of doing or saying just about anything. That said, I don’t think I ever expected to see him whip out his penis to a room full of enrapt onlookers. I’m not sure whether I should thank or chide You and the Night for subjecting me to such an unexpected reveal, but it stands as the oddball centerpiece of an equally oddball film. From its misfiring openings through to a climax that touches the face of brilliance, Yann Gonzalez’s ambitious feature length debut makes for a bumpy ride, but one worth straddling.

Set over the course of one night, the film tracks the pasts and
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Eric Cantona talks about his penis in Nsfw clip from You and the Night

Eric Cantona talks about his penis in Nsfw clip from You and the Night
Eric Cantona famously waxed lyrical about seagulls and trawlers during his football-playing days, but now he's turned his attention to another subject entirely for latest acting role You and the Night.

In the above clip from Yann Gonzalez's French sex comedy, the Manchester United legend plays 'The Stallion', a dinner party guest who regales his friends with details of his significant member.

M83's Anthony Gonzalez has provided an original soundtrack for the film, which also stars Kate Moran, Niels Schneider and Nicolas Maury.

You and the Night will be released in cinemas on October 3.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Renowned French Magazine Picks Two Unusual Thrillers as Year's Best: Erotic Gay Tale, Girls Gone Wild Flick

‘Cahiers du Cinéma’ Top Ten Films of 2013: Gay erotic thriller ‘Stranger by the Lake,’ Girls Gone Wild thriller ‘Spring Breakers’ are top picks (image: ‘Stranger by the Lake’ poster) We’ve begun updating our posts featuring end-of-the-year awards season winners and nominees, in addition to various Top Ten lists. So, below you’ll find the top ten films of 2013 according to the iconic French magazine Cahiers du Cinéma, which announced its selections in late November. Now, what was Cahiers du Cinéma‘s top movie of 2013? The answer is Alain Guiraudie’s gay erotic thriller Stranger by the Lake / L’inconnu du lac, about a young man (Pierre de Ladonchamps) who falls in lust with a suspected murderer (Christophe Paou). Back in the spring, Stranger by the Lake won the Queer Palm at the Cannes Film Festival. ‘Cahiers du Cinéma’ top ten list: Several curious picks The Cahiers du Cinéma
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

‘You and the Night’ Review: The Best French Orgy Movie of the Year

The brilliant, bizarre You and the Night has found itself in a unique position. It played Cannes back in May, where it was the third most popular French film with Lgbt content at the film festival. Such a strange circumstance has probably never before been possible, and yet it happened. Blue Is the Warmest Color won the Palme d’Or, Stranger by the Lake won the Queer Palm, and You and the Night ended up the bridesmaid at an entirely unprecedented celebration of French queer cinema on the Croisette. This is a shame. You and the Night, the debut film by Yann Gonzalez, is nothing short of extraordinary. Its small-scale orgiastic plot is akin to the controlled sexual experiments of other, prior queer filmmakers like François Ozon (Sitcom) and Pier Paolo Pasolini (Teorema). Its style is of another ilk entirely. Gonzalez has tapped into a new twist on the chaotic abandon of his forebears, a
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Cannes Film Review: ‘You and the Night’

Ali and Mathias are planning an orgy, but before the fun can begin, the participants must get to know each other first. One by one, they tell their stories in director Yann Gonzalez’s “You and the Night,” transporting audiences to artificial spaces that stand in for fantasy and memory. Though this alternately sensuous and silly pastiche borrows more than it invents, indications suggest Gonzalez may be the next Almodovar or Ozon (a budding Araki, at least), heralding the arrival of a new gay-cinema darling amid his cast of pretty young things, which includes the feature debut of Alain Fabien Delon.

It was bound to happen: After nearly a decade of hearing up-and-coming directors extol the influence of 1970s American movies on their work, we can finally discern the imprint that ’80s culture made on the subsequent generation of storytellers (such as Xavier Dolan, from whom Gonzalez steals golden-haired boy-god
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Review: ‘Let My People Go’ is a Flight of Fancy

French director Mikael Buch’s first offering Let My People Go is a lighthearted and occasionally thoughtful attempt to tease out the appeal of the ties that bind a gay and Jewish identity together. Buch’s stand-in protagonist, Ruben, is a French Jew living in bliss in Finland, land of Tom. The reference to the book of Exodus and the exilic condition in the title is about as biblical as the movie gets; but its dual meaning illuminates the pull of these two communities. Buch wants to let his people go – to leave behind the specificity and weight of an ethnic identity – but also wants their recognition of his freedom to be a gay man – to have them grant him freedom, too. This tension is played for comedy rather than pathos, which is for the better given how slight the drama ultimately is. The cartoonish situations, broad characterizations and color-saturated Pierre-et-Gilles aesthetic amplify each narrative stroke, resulting
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

Let My People Go! movie poster and images

Zeitgeist Films has sent along the poster and images from Mikael Buch's Let My People Go!, starring Nicolas Maury and Carmen Maura. The film opens on January 11th in New York City, and the Los Angeles the week after. Mikael Buch directs from he script he wrote alongside renowned arthouse auteur Christophe Honoré (Love Songs), A sweet and hilarious fusion of gay romantic comedy, Jewish family drama and French bedroom farce, Mikael Buch’s Let My People Go! follows the travails and daydreams of the lovelorn Reuben (Regular Lovers’ Nicolas Maury), a French-Jewish gay mailman living in fairytale Finland (where he got his Ma in “Comparative Sauna Cultures”) with his gorgeous Nordic boyfriend. But just before Passover, a series of mishaps and a lovers’ quarrel exile the heartbroken Reuben back to Paris and his zany family—including Almodovar goddess Carmen Maura (Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Let My People Go! movie poster and images

Zeitgeist Films has sent along the poster and images from Mikael Buch's Let My People Go!, starring Nicolas Maury and Carmen Maura. The film opens on January 11th in New York City, and the Los Angeles the week after. Mikael Buch directs from he script he wrote alongside renowned arthouse auteur Christophe Honoré (Love Songs), A sweet and hilarious fusion of gay romantic comedy, Jewish family drama and French bedroom farce, Mikael Buch’s Let My People Go! follows the travails and daydreams of the lovelorn Reuben (Regular Lovers’ Nicolas Maury), a French-Jewish gay mailman living in fairytale Finland (where he got his Ma in “Comparative Sauna Cultures”) with his gorgeous Nordic boyfriend. But just before Passover, a series of mishaps and a lovers’ quarrel exile the heartbroken Reuben back to Paris and his zany family—including Almodovar goddess Carmen Maura (Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,
See full article at Upcoming-Movies.com »

Inside Out 2012: ‘Let My People Go!’ cheerfully fun, but sadly unfunny

Let My People Go!

Directed by Mikael Buch

Written by Mikael Buch and Christophe Honoré

France, 2011

In a small, idyllic Finnish town, Ruben (Nicolas Maury) is living a similarly idyllic life. His lover, Teemu (Jarkko Niemi), is a blonde bombshell of a boyfriend, he finds steady work as a postal worker, his neighbours seem to like him, and nobody seems to mind that he’s homosexual. To Ruben, life is gay. This all changes when Ruben delivers a package of spurious intentions. He’s forced to pack his bags and head back to France, leaving behind his dream life for a hellish nightmare.

Back home, Ruben is reunited with his dysfunctional family, and as tensions come to a boil, secrets and harboured resentments are finally brought to the forefront. However, the film never elevates beyond genre conventions. The characters are stock, their problems are clichéd, and they way they resolve the conflicts are overly sentimental.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Tjff 2012: ‘Let My People Go!’ is a cheerfully fun film that’s sadly unfunny

Let My People Go!

Directed by Mikael Buch

Written by Mikael Buch and Christophe Honoré

France, 2011

While confiding with his Rabbi, Ruben (Nicolas Maury) begins checking off his laundry list of foibles. From his precarious relationship with a schoolteacher in Finland to his exhausting family problems back home in France, Ruben becomes disillusioned with his fate and his faith, declaring how his life is “one bad Jewish joke”.

Let My People Go!, a film about Ruben’s said life problems, is, as predicted, exactly as he describes. Earnest while being endearing, it’s a cheerfully fun film that’s sadly unfunny.

In a small, idyllic Finnish town, Ruben is enjoying the good life, working as a cheerful postal carrier and living with his blonde bombshell boyfriend, Teemu (Jarkko Niemi). However, when Ruben delivers a package of spurious intentions, he’s forced to pack his bags and head back to France.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Cannes 2011. Critics' Week Lineup

  • MUBI
Updated through 4/28.

La Semaine de la Critique, known in the English-speaking world as Critics' Week, is celebrating its 50th year, and festivals and institutions from all over — and we at Mubi are excited to be among them — are chiming in with special series and retrospectives saluting some the greatest film that have premiered at this parallel section of the Cannes Film Festival. Watch this space for upcoming details. Meantime, here's the lineup for Critics' Week 2011.

Feature Films

Hagar Ben Asher's The Slut. This debut feature "will tell of a woman (Ben Asher herself) drifting away from one sexual encounter to another," writes Eithan Weitz at Ioncinema. Tamar’s behavior is fixed. One man after another, a hand job, a blow job, and so on. But she is also the mother of Mika and Noa, 12 and 8. She no longer seeks redemption, until Shai arrives. He comes in order to handle his dead mother’s property.
See full article at MUBI »

See also

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