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Interview: Paula Vogel Talks About Being a Woman in Theater and Making Her Broadway Debut with…

Interview: Paula Vogel Talks About Being a Woman in Theater and Making Her Broadway Debut with “Indecent”Paula Vogel: paulavogelplaywright.com

Paula Vogel is making her Broadway debut this season with “Indecent.” There is nothing surprising about this — except that Vogel is just now making her Broadway debut. She’s an accomplished playwright whose many credits include “The Baltimore Waltz,” “Desdemona,” “A Play About A Handkerchief,” “The Oldest Profession,” and “And Baby Makes Seven.” She won a Pulitzer Prize in 1998 for “How I Learned to Drive.”

Besides her work on the stage, Vogel has led the graduate playwriting program and new play festival at Brown University and served as Chair of the playwriting department at the Yale School of Drama. She has also mentored many important playwrights, including Lynn Nottage, Gina Gionfriddo, and Sarah Ruhl.

The idea for “Indecent,” which explores the impact of the 1923 play “God of Vengeance,” came to her as a PhD student in the library at Cornell 40 years ago and eventually evolved through a collaboration with theater director Rebecca Taichman. The original work by Sholem Asch in 1907 about the erotic awakening between two women also happened to be Taichman’s thesis project at Yale.

“Indecent” recently moved uptown from the Vineyard Theatre to the Cort Theater, where the play opened April 18th. It was nominated for multiple Tony Awards, including Best Play.

I recently spoke with Vogel about making her Broadway debut, being female in a male-dominated industry, and her hopes for “Indecent.”

W&H: How does it feel seeing your name on the marquee?

Pv: I’ve been telling everybody that even still today when I go to the theater, my first assumption is that there’s been an accident, that there’s a fire alarm and everybody is out on the street. I can’t quite process it yet.

W&H: What’s it like seeing “Indecent”on the Broadway stage?

Pv: It’s as beautiful as it was in my mind. It rarely happens that something is as beautiful as you dreamt.

W&H: How has gender impacted your career and the choices that you’ve made as a playwright?

Pv: Gender has been a constant chip on my shoulder. It has had an enormous impact. I have all of these ideas for Broadway-sized plays that I’ve never written because I just knew I couldn’t get them produced. This idea has too many women in the cast; this one would take two to three hours and if I got past one-hour-and-forty-five minutes I’d be told my play is too long.

I also really feel that the reviews that women directors and playwrights and screenwriters get are very gendered. Critics say different things about plays written by a woman than [ones] written by a man. I think that most of us know that it’s going to be a much deeper climb. It means that as artists we have better table manners because behavior is judged differently if you’re a woman artist.

It also means that I’ve chosen to underwrite my healthcare and my rent by teaching, and I’ve loved it. Most of the women I’ve mentored who are younger are doing more and more television, and I completely understand. For the first time in my life, I’m writing full-time. I’m about to go on Medicare, and that’s the biggest grant/scholarship I’ve ever gotten in my life as a woman writer.

W&H: Since you wrote “How I Learned to Drive,” did you envision gender equality being different today in theater?

Pv: I have actually thought that since I was 15 years old. I didn’t think I was going to be a playwright. Once I started writing in my 20s, I thought I’d go to Broadway. Now it’s 45 years later. But gradually you start to think: how can I write a play with three characters? How can I write a play that can be done on $10,000? How can I do a play that when the theater company runs out of money because of the large plays written by men that didn’t go well at the box office, they’ll suddenly go, “Oh crap, we need a small play with three characters. Quick — call Paula Vogel! I think she has a three-character play.” That’s kind of the mathematics of how we do it.

I have had the kind of unique experience of seeing “How I Learned to Drive” done on a large stage in Icelandic in Reykjavik — a much larger stage than I’ve ever seen in New York up until now. “How I Learned to Drive” was produced in Beijing two years ago in Mandarin. Yet I am constantly told it’s a women’s play and it’s not universal. Meanwhile, it’s on tour in Latin America!

It’s just a part of our lives. I could grind my teeth down but I have to keep writing. You have to write for the joy of it. I have to write so I can get back into the room.

The Vineyard Theater has been my home. It has one-tenth to one-twentieth of the annual budget that most New York City theaters have. So, I think about how I can do plays to speak to audiences of about 125 seats. I think about getting the play in front of an audience and a rehearsal hall, and that’s what I live for.

What’s driving me crazy is I now have taught four decades of brilliant women playwrights. I’m not grinding my teeth because it took me forty years to get to Broadway; I’m grinding my teeth because it took Lynn Nottage to bring “Sweat,” a play I produced years ago, to get there. My aim in life is to see the brilliance that I carry around with me that I know in these women writers. I want everyone to know about them.

“Indecent”: NewYorkTheater/YouTube

W&H: Tell me about your collaboration with Rebecca Taichman.

Pv: When I talked to Rebecca, I already knew I wanted to work with her because ever since I had heard about her thesis project when she was in her 20s I thought, this woman is brilliant. It was just a matter of when we’d work together — [not if]. I loved this play, “God of Vengeance,” and had never forgotten it. I knew all about the obscenity trial. There was a little article in The New York Times about a conference she organized about the playwright, Sholem Asch, as her thesis play. So I started to see her shows and thought this woman is an extraordinary director. I’d seen four or five of the plays she directed.

I actually saw the play in my mind. I saw actors in an attic. They were wearing rag tag clothing in an attic room. I knew the time and the place and I knew that’s where the play needed to go. I saw it as a much larger play and she agreed. She handed over the trial transcripts, diaries, and letters and I dutifully read everything.

I wrote several drafts where I tried to put the obscenity trial on stage, but I couldn’t make it work. I told her I didn’t see it, and she said, try it, try it, try it. The relationship was us together reading every page of the first draft in a cabin in two weeks. I wrote more than forty drafts in the last seven years.

W&H: Did you speak to Holocaust survivors and/or Yiddish actors? Was that a part of your research process?

Pv: I talked to Holocaust survivors only when we got to New York and we were in rehearsal at the Vineyard. Up until that point, I had read novels and poetry by Holocaust survivors. I did history about Poland; I did research about theaters in ghettos and camps; I did research about 1920s and 1930s theater; I read a lot about Yiddish theater in early America; I did a lot of migration history. I just read anything I could about the time period.

W&H: It seems that you’ve tapped into modern issues of resonance including equality, censorship, and immigration. How do you feel about all of this and the play coming out now?

Pv: Ten years ago, I wrote a play called “A Civil War Christmas” because I was very concerned we could enter a civil war. I thought that hate speech was increasing, as well as the white supremacists. I thought there was a rise of the confederacy and thought we were going toward a Neo-Nazi rise in this country. It has happened many times. The last time that really happened was in the 1950s when we saw a suppression of freedom and the time before that was in the 1920s and 1930s. Those are the two periods where our pendulum has swung backwards.

I had a concern about hate speech back then… if you remember what was said about Mexican Americans then and about English being the only language. The Muslim hate speech has grown, as well as the hate speech against Latinas and Latinos. We knew this would be an ongoing challenge for us when we started. I was actually still doing rewrites when I saw the image of the little Syrian boy being washed ashore.

We also knew that the immigration laws changed right before “The God of Vengeance.” Jewish refugees could not enter the country. Anne Frank’s family was trying to get to America. We could go on and on and on. Rebecca says it best when she says that it’s terrifying that the themes are more relevant now than when we started.

W&H: What are your hopes with the play and do you think it will prompt more writers to tell stories about real issues of adversity that will lead to real social change?

Pv: I actually think that writers are writing those stories, but I hope that theaters are not doing a benign censorship of the plays that are out there. People are saying they can’t produce a play because it’s political. I’ve been told that I’m too political, but that’s the purpose of theater. I hope that theaters realize they need to be part of this conversation by doing the plays and films that are being written that are resonant right now. I’m hoping this conversation encourages other producers.

I certainly hope that “Indecent” runs everywhere. I hope that people go and see this play and leave the theater thinking, “I’ve got to talk to my grandmother,” or “I’ve got to find out what happened to my family,” or that they ask questions in order to be a witness in the time we are living in right now.

I have visions of the play being cinematic on the big or small screen. We’ll see.

Interview: Paula Vogel Talks About Being a Woman in Theater and Making Her Broadway Debut with… was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

‘Can You Forgive Her?’ Theater Review: Amber Tamblyn Copes With Extreme Student Debt

‘Can You Forgive Her?’ Theater Review: Amber Tamblyn Copes With Extreme Student Debt
The most fascinating character in Gina Gionfriddo’s new play, “Can You Forgive Her?,” doesn’t show up until about two-thirds of the way through. One could debate over whether Gionfriddo has written a great role in David, who’s paying to keep one woman while living with another woman he never sleeps with (except for appearances), or if the magnificent actor Frank Wood just makes him look great. Judging from the Off Broadway production that opened Tuesday at the Vineyard Theatre, it’s no doubt an inspired combination of the two. Wood brings an off-center gravitas to a shaggy-dog story desperately in.
See full article at The Wrap »

Exclusive: For Amber Tamblyn, Having a Child Is the Ultimate Expression of Art

Exclusive: For Amber Tamblyn, Having a Child Is the Ultimate Expression of Art
It has been a busy year for actress-director-author Amber Tamblyn. She’s released her feature directorial debut, is starring in a play and just gave birth to her first child.

At 34, Tamblyn is more than used to juggling a personal life and a professional one. She’s been working for over two decades, beginning with General Hospital and then becoming a household face as Joan on the CBS drama Joan of Arcadia before playing Tibby in The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. But it’s this new job that’s completely unique to her.

“To have my first Mother's Day as a mother is just wild,” says Tamblyn, who married actor David Cross in 2012. And since her self-ascribed motto is “Never mind, I’ll do it” -- also the same name as her production company -- she’ll most likely be taking to her new and busier schedule as mother, writer, director
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Vineyard Theatre Will Mount NYC Premiere of Kander & Pierce Musical Kid Victory, New Plays During 2016-17 Season

A new musical by John Kander and Gregory Pierce, Kid Victory, along with the new plays This Day Forward by Nicky Silver and Can You Forgive Her by Gina Gionfriddo, will be produced by the Vineyard Theatre during the 2016-2017 season, it has been announced by the company's Artistic Directors, Douglas Aibel and Sarah Stern. Vineyard Theatre is located at 108 E. 15 St. in New York City.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

News Bits: Rim 2, Alienist, Max, Soul

Pacific Rim 2

Guillermo del Toro's "Pacific Rim" sequel is reportedly going by either the code name or subtitle of "Maelstrom," and is currently tipped for a start of filming date in November in Toronto. Charlie Hunnam, Charlie Day, and Burn Gorman are expected to be back in the movie which picks up a few years after the events of the first. [Source: Bmd]

The Alienist

"The Alienist" author Caleb Carr is joining TNT's television adaptation of his best-selling novel as a consulting producer. Pilot and series writer Hossein Amini will serve as consulting producers on the episodes they pen. Gina Gionfriddo, E. Max Frye and John Sayles have also joined the project as writers.

Set in Gilded Age New York, the story follows Dr. Laszlo Kreizler who - with the help of newspaper reporter John Moore and police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt - uses the emerging discipline of psychology to track
See full article at Dark Horizons »

‘The Alienist’ Author Caleb Carr Boards TNT Series as Consulting Producer (Exclusive)

‘The Alienist’ Author Caleb Carr Boards TNT Series as Consulting Producer (Exclusive)
Caleb Carr, who authored “The Alienist,” is joining TNT’s television adaptation of his best-selling novel as a consulting producer, Variety has learned exclusively.

Gina Gionfriddo (“House of Cards, “Law & Order”), E. Max Frye (“Band of Brothers”) and John Sayles (“Bass Reeves”) also join the Paramount Television and Anonymous Content project as writers. The trio, joining pilot and series writer Hossein Amini, will serve as consulting producers on the episodes they pen.

“After twenty years of tough struggle and countless failed attempts, I’m delighted that Paramount Television, Anonymous Content and TNT have decided to join forces and bring ‘The Alienist’ to life in what, based on the material I’ve read, has the potential to be a faithful and exciting TV series,” Carr commented.

Previously announced, “True Detective’s” Cary Fukunaga will direct the drama. He and Amini will exec produce with Eric Roth. Anonymous Content’s Steve Golin
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Her and Captain Phillips take top honours at the 2014 WGA Awards

Last night the Writers Guild of America announced the winners of the 66th annual WGA Awards, with Her (Spike Jonze) the recipient of the award for Best Original Screenplay and Captain Phillips (Billy Ray) taking home the award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Among the winners on the small screen were Breaking Bad (Episodic Drama), Veep (Episodic Comedy), House of Cards (New Series) and The Simpsons (Animation), while The Last of Us was victorious in the videogame category.

Check out the full list of winners here....

Original Screenplay:

Her, Written by Spike Jonze; Warner Bros.

Adapted Screenplay:

Captain Phillips, Screenplay by Billy Ray; Based on the book A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy Seals, and Dangerous Days at Sea by Richard Phillips with Stephan Talty; Columbia Pictures

Documentary Screenplay:

Stories We Tell, Written by Sarah Polley; Roadside Attractions

Drama Series:

Breaking Bad, Written by Sam Catlin, Vince Gilligan, Peter Gould,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Her, Captain Phillips & Stories We Tell Take Home Top Honors At 2014 Writers Guild Awards

Her, Stories We Tell and Captain Phillips took home top honors on Saturday night as the big winners of the 2014 Writers Guild Awards for outstanding achievement in writing for screen. Television, radio, news, promotional, videogame, and new media writing were also recognized at simultaneous ceremonies at the Jw Marriott L.A. Live in Los Angeles and the Edison Ballroom in New York City. It’s the final precursor guild award leading up to the Oscars.

Below is a complete list of the winners.

Screen Winners

Original Screenplay (matched up with the Academy Awards nominations)

Her, Written by Spike Jonze; Warner Bros.

Nominees included American Hustle, Blue Jasmine, Dallas Buyers Club, Her and Nebraska.

Adapted Screenplay (3 for 5 Oscar nominations)

Captain Phillips, Screenplay by Billy Ray; Based on the book A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy Seals, and Dangerous Days at Sea by Richard Phillips with Stephan Talty; Columbia Pictures

In addition to Captain Phillips,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

'Her' and 'Captain Phillips' win Writers Guild Awards

'Her' and 'Captain Phillips' win Writers Guild Awards
Spike Jonze’s philosophical sci-fi love story Her, and Billy Ray’s harrowing true-life hostage saga Captain Phillips earned best original and adapted screenplays, respectively, from the Writers Guild Awards on Saturday.

In the original category, Her was facing its four rivals for the Oscar: American Hustle, Blue Jasmine, Dallas Buyers Club, and Nebraska, so its victory can be seen as a strong harbinger of where the Academy Award could go on March 2. In anecdotal sampling of Academy members, EW’s Prize Fighter has also determined that Her is far and away the front-runner for this category.

The WGA’s
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

WGA: ‘Captain Phillips,’ ‘Her’ Win Top Screenplay Awards

WGA: ‘Captain Phillips,’ ‘Her’ Win Top Screenplay Awards
Billy Ray won the Writers Guild of America award for adapted screenplay for seagoing drama “Captain Phillips” and Spike Jonze took the trophy for original screenplay for futuristic romancer “Her.”

The top TV awards went to the final season of “Breaking Bad,” which won both the drama series and drama episode trophies. HBO’s “Veep” won the comedy series award while “30 Rock” took the episodic comedy award and Netflix’s “House of Cards” copped the new series trophy.

Ray won over Tracy Letts for “August: Osage County,” Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke for “Before Midnight,” Peter Berg for “Lone Survivor” and Terence Winter for the adapted screenplay for “The Wolf of Wall Street.”

Ray’s screenplay was based on the book “A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy Seals, and Dangerous Days at Sea” by Richard Phillips with Stephan Talty. Tom Hanks portrayed Phillips in the movie — a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

WGA: ‘Captain Phillips,’ ‘Her’ Win Top Screenplay Awards

WGA: ‘Captain Phillips,’ ‘Her’ Win Top Screenplay Awards
Billy Ray won the Writers Guild of America award for adapted screenplay for seagoing drama “Captain Phillips” and Spike Jonze took the trophy for original screenplay for futuristic romancer “Her.”

The top TV awards went to the final season of “Breaking Bad,” which won both the drama series and drama episode trophies. HBO’s “Veep” won the comedy series award while “30 Rock” took the episodic comedy award and Netflix’s “House of Cards” copped the new series trophy.

Ray won over Tracy Letts for “August: Osage County,” Richard Linklater, Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke for “Before Midnight,” Peter Berg for “Lone Survivor” and Terence Winter for the adapted screenplay for “The Wolf of Wall Street.”

Ray’s screenplay was based on the book “A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy Seals, and Dangerous Days at Sea” by Richard Phillips with Stephan Talty. Tom Hanks portrayed Phillips in the movie — a
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Winners Of The 66th Annual Writers Guild Of America Awards

Tonight, the Writers Guild of America presented their awards for excellence in film and television for 2013. All eyes were on their top two categories, Original Screenplay and Adapted Screenplay, and while the former went to Spike Jonze’s incredible Her as expected, the latter went to Billy Ray’s Captain Phillips, which was completely out of the blue.

Her was widely expected to win due to its immense popularity throughout awards season, taking 20 screenplay wins from groups such as the HFPA and Bfca. However, Captain Phillips was a complete surprise given that it had not managed to win a single screenplay award prior to tonight, but as I’ve said before, it was going to be hard to tell which nominee was the favorite given the fact that the disqualified 12 Years a Slave has been the clear frontrunner throughout the season. However, it’s still quite shocking that Before Midnight
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Writers Guild of America Nominees

The winners of the Writers Guild of America awards will be announced in simultaneous ceremonies Saturday in Los Angeles and New York. The nominees:

Screen Nominees

Original Screenplay

American Hustle, Written by Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell; Columbia Pictures

Blue Jasmine, Written by Woody Allen; Sony Pictures Classics

Dallas Buyers Club, Written by Craig Borten & Melisa Wallack; Focus Features

Her, Written by Spike Jonze; Warner Bros. Winner

Nebraska, Written by Bob Nelson; Paramount Pictures

Adapted Screenplay

August: Osage County, Screenplay by Tracy Letts; Based on his play; The Weinstein Company

Before Midnight, Written by Richard Linklater & Julie Delpy & Ethan Hawke; Based on characters created by Richard Linklater & Kim Krizan; Sony Pictures Classics

Captain Phillips, Screenplay by Billy Ray; Based on the book A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy Seals, and Dangerous Days at Sea by Richard Phillips with Stephan Talty; Columbia Pictures Winner

Lone Survivor, Written by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Writers Guild of America Nominees

The winners of the Writers Guild of America awards will be announced in simultaneous ceremonies Saturday in Los Angeles and New York. The nominees:

Screen Nominees

Original Screenplay

American Hustle, Written by Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell; Columbia Pictures

Blue Jasmine, Written by Woody Allen; Sony Pictures Classics

Dallas Buyers Club, Written by Craig Borten & Melisa Wallack; Focus Features

Her, Written by Spike Jonze; Warner Bros. Winner

Nebraska, Written by Bob Nelson; Paramount Pictures

Adapted Screenplay

August: Osage County, Screenplay by Tracy Letts; Based on his play; The Weinstein Company

Before Midnight, Written by Richard Linklater & Julie Delpy & Ethan Hawke; Based on characters created by Richard Linklater & Kim Krizan; Sony Pictures Classics

Captain Phillips, Screenplay by Billy Ray; Based on the book A Captain’s Duty: Somali Pirates, Navy Seals, and Dangerous Days at Sea by Richard Phillips with Stephan Talty; Columbia Pictures Winner

Lone Survivor, Written by
See full article at Variety - TV News »

'Breaking Bad,' 'House of Cards' scribes earn Writer's Guild noms

'Breaking Bad,' 'House of Cards' scribes earn Writer's Guild noms
Writers for Breaking Bad and House of Cards were among those singled out for the 2014 Writers Guild Awards, which will be held on Feb. 1 in Los Angeles and New York.

The nominees are:

Drama Series:

Breaking Bad, Written by Sam Catlin, Vince Gilligan, Peter Gould, Gennifer Hutchison, George Mastras, Thomas Schnauz, Moira Walley-Beckett; AMC

The Good Wife, Written by Meredith Averill, Leonard Dick, Keith Eisner, Jacqueline Hoyt, Ted Humphrey, Michelle King, Robert King, Erica Shelton Kodish, Matthew Montoya, J.C. Nolan, Luke Schelhaas, Nichelle Tramble Spellman, Craig Turk, Julie Wolfe; CBS

Homeland, Written by Henry Bromell, William E. Bromell, Alexander Cary,
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

‘House Of Cards’, ‘Orange Is The New Black’ Among Writers Guild’s TV Nominees

Los Angeles and New York – The Writers Guild of America, West (Wgaw) and the Writers Guild of America, East (Wgae) have announced nominations for outstanding achievement in television, new media, news, radio, promotional writing, and graphic animation during the 2013 season. The winners will be honored at the 2014 Writers Guild Awards on Saturday, February 1, 2014, at simultaneous ceremonies in Los Angeles and New York. Television Nominees Drama Series Breaking Bad, Written by Sam Catlin, Vince Gilligan, Peter Gould, Gennifer Hutchison, George Mastras, Thomas Schnauz, Moira Walley-Beckett; AMC The Good Wife, Written by Meredith Averill, Leonard Dick, Keith Eisner, Jacqueline Hoyt, Ted Humphrey, Michelle King, Robert King, Erica Shelton Kodish, Matthew Montoya, J.C. Nolan, Luke Schelhaas, Nichelle Tramble Spellman, Craig Turk, Julie Wolfe; CBS Homeland, Written by Henry Bromell, William E. Bromell, Alexander Cary, Alex Gansa, Howard Gordon, Barbara Hall, Patrick Harbinson, Chip Johannessen, Meredith Stiehm, Charlotte Stoudt, James Yoshimura; Showtime House Of Cards,
See full article at Deadline TV »

Bww TV: Amy Brenneman, Beth Dixon, Virginia Kull and More in Highlights of Rapture, Blister, Burn at Geffen Playhouse

The original New York cast -- Amy Brenneman Judging Amy, NYPD Blue, Private Practice, Beth Dixon, Virginia Kull, Kellie Overbey and Lee Tergesen Monster, Wayne's World, Weird Science - are set for the West Coast premiere of Rapture, Blister, Burn, written by Gina Gionfriddo, in the Gil Cates Theater at the Geffen Playhouse, running through September 22, 2013. BroadwayWorld has a first look at highlights of the production below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Writers Guild, NBC Battle Heats Up

Writers Guild, NBC Battle Heats Up
The Writers Guild of America has amped up its battle with NBC’s documentary-reality operation Peacock Prods., taking its unionization case to Comcast/NBCU topper Stephen Burke.

The guild has been attempting to unionize 100 freelance producers and associate producers for more than a year. Peacock produces nonfiction programming for basic cable networks such as “Caught on Camera” and “Skywire Live with Nik Wallenda.”

The WGA East announced Monday that writers from more than 20 shows on NBC and USA networks have written to Burke urging him to “respect the results” of a recent representation election at Peacock.

Vareity first reported in June that the Natl. Labor Relations Board had impounded ballots from an election held to determine whether the producers would be represented by the WGA East. The ballots remain uncounted due to NBC filing an appeal to an Nlrb ruling, which rejected the network’s assertion that Peacock producers are
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Ayad Akhtar's 'Disgraced' wins Pulitzer Prize for Drama

Ayad Akhtar's 'Disgraced' wins Pulitzer Prize for Drama
Ayad Akhtar’s play “Disgraced" -- which examines the struggle of a Pakistani-American corporate lawyer to reconcile his heritage with his ambition -- won this year's Pulitzer Prize for Drama. After premiering at Chicago’s American Theater Company, the play ran off-Broadway last fall in the smallest of the three theaters at Lincoln Center. The Gotham production starred "Daily Show" contributor Aasif Mandvi as the legal eagle and Heidi Armbruster as his wife, an artist who uses Islamic imagery in her work. One of the other finalists -- Amy Herzog’s domestic drama “4,000 Miles” -- also played at Lct while Gina Gionfriddo’s wry comedy “Rapture, Blister, Burn,” debuted at another off-Broadway house, Playwrights Horizons. Administered by Columbia University, the Pulitzer Prize for drama is designated "for a distinguished play by an American author,...
See full article at Gold Derby »
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