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TV Review: Frontline’s ‘The United States of Secrets’

TV Review: Frontline’s ‘The United States of Secrets’
Methodical and comprehensive, “Frontline’s” documentary “The United States of Secrets” offers a blow-by-blow account of the Bush administration’s embrace of potentially illegal spying/eavesdropping techniques, President Obama’s decision to continue them (despite campaign promises to the contrary) and, most compellingly, those who sought to blow the whistle on government overreach, culminating with Edward Snowden’s unprecedented dump of classified documents. If the two-part project breaks little new ground, it’s an utterly thorough primer on what transpired that almost plays like a John Le Carre thriller, with remarkably candid interviews from participants on all sides.

As producer Michael Kirk makes clear, the White House — and Vice President Dick Cheney in particular — felt that all tools must be available to prevent a replay of the Sept. 11 attacks. That meant stretching the parameters of what was permissible, justifying the techniques via what former Dept. of Justice official Jack Goldsmith
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Following Scotus Health Care Decision, Megyn Kelly Questions Bush Official Who Vetted Justice Roberts

On Wednesday, former Attorney General under President George W. Bush, Alberto Gonzales, appeared on Fox News Channel’s America Live with Megyn Kelly to weigh in on the Supreme Court verdict on health care reform. Kelly asked Gonzales for his insight into the thinking that Chief Justice John Roberts may have applied when he joined the Supreme Court’s liberal members in finding the individual mandate constitutional as a tax.
See full article at Mediaite - TV »

Holder Testifies To Congress About National Security Leaks, Is Called Upon To Resign

Attorney General Eric Holder told Congress today that he and FBI Director Robert Mueller have both been questioned by investigators over the leaks concerning secret drone strikes and cyberattacks.

The leaks appeared in a New York Times article two weeks ago, and have since drawn harsh criticized from congressional leaders on both sides of the aisle, who have characterized the leaks as some of the worst in national security history.

Gop figures have criticized Holder's appointment of two Justice Department attorneys to lead an investigation into the leaks, and called on Holder to appoint an independent counsel. Republicans love independent counsels, except when they're appointed by Democrats, in which case they're blatantly political.

Holder also announced today that two of the investigators—does the DoJ operate on a buddy system or something?—involved have been recused, because their divisions may have had access to the information involved in the leaks.
See full article at Celebsology »

Fantastic Fest 2010 Announces Fourty Films in this Year's Short Competition

Fantastic Fest Logo 2010Fantastic Fest is moving into its sixth year and the 2010 event will take place in Austin, Texas September 23rd. This year's showings will include over fourty short films, each of which has been listed below. The horror short highlights include the creature feature "Culebra," the exorcist fueled "Deus Irae," the comical "The Legend of Beaver Dam," the dark "La Petit Mort" and undead characterizations in "Only Son." More details on the horror shorts are available below, along with the entire 2010 Fantastic Fest short film lineup.

"5 Minute Dating"

Canada

Director: Peter Hatch.

"A dating service where anyone can find their soul mate" (Fantastic).

"12 Years"

Germany

Director: Daniel Nocke.

"We're not the only species that needs to endure the wrenching pain of relationships gone sour" (Fantastic).

"The Astronomer's Sun"

Director: David Bunting.

"Lovely animated story about a boy and his bear and the secrets of the universe."

"Atomic Hubbub"

UK

Director: Stephen Irwin.
See full article at 28 Days Later Analysis »

Complete Fantastic Fest Short Film Lineup Announced!

Hot diggity! Fantastic Fest is screening a whole lot of shorts and they're a whole lot of good. We've featured a number of these on Twitch in the past so get searching to turn up a fistful of happiness. Here's the full announcement!

Fantastic Fest 2010 Announces Full Short Films Slate

Over 40 Genre-Bending Shorts From Across The Globe

Set To Premiere At This Year's Festival

Austin, TX---Friday, September 3, 2010--- Fantastic Fest announces the full short films lineup, including over 40 genre-bending selections from around the world.  The festival has amassed the ultimate array of cool, twisted, beautiful, mind-bending, horrifying and hilarious short films. The best short films can pack in more emotion, laughs adrenaline, creativity and flat-out insanity than a million big-budget blockbusters. Or they can show you something so ambitiously horrendous that you beg for mercy. 

Fantastic Fest 2010 Short Film Lineup

5 Minute Dating

Canada, Director: Peter Hatch 

A dating service
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Good, The Bad And The Wtf: Clashing News, Wolves and All

Things to know about at this week: the first Clash of the Titans teaser, Steve Guttenberg still hanging onto his 80's glory, toy movies are still wanted, and the fantastic piece of news that is the death of the Oldboy remake. What's that? That's right. Read along.

The Good

• A very good poster for Tim Burton's Alice in Wonderland was posted on the Mad Hatter's official Facebook page. Two more are coming, presumably on the Red Queen and White Queen pages.

• A selection of props from Duncan Jones' Moon are up for auction on eBay, including Gerty himself! It's the actual full-size thing, measuring 83” x 33” x 27.5" and even signed by the director himself. As of writing it's still bidding at £1,000, so totally affordable if you're a collector.

• After being impressed by the new trailer for The Wolfman that was released a couple of weeks back, now I'm even more impressed by the posters.
See full article at JustPressPlay »

DOJ names anti-piracy chief for Asia

WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration on Thursday continued to pressure Asian countries to get tough on copyright theft as it created a senior post inside the Justice Department to coordinate enforcement efforts in the region, which has been a piracy hotbed. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales appointed federal prosecutor Christopher Sonderby of San Jose, Calif., to serve as the coordinator for the Asian region. "Protecting intellectual property rights in the United States and throughout the world is one of the highest priorities of the Department of Justice," Gonzales said. "My appointment of an intellectual property law enforcement coordinator for Asia is an important step in coordinating enforcement efforts in a critical region of the world."

DOJ names anti-piracy chief for Asia

WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration on Thursday continued to pressure Asian countries to get tough on copyright theft as it created a senior post inside the Justice Department to coordinate enforcement efforts in the region, which has been a piracy hotbed. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales appointed federal prosecutor Christopher Sonderby of San Jose, Calif., to serve as the coordinator for the Asian region. "Protecting intellectual property rights in the United States and throughout the world is one of the highest priorities of the Department of Justice," Gonzales said. "My appointment of an intellectual property law enforcement coordinator for Asia is an important step in coordinating enforcement efforts in a critical region of the world."

Bush seeks tough new piracy laws

WASHINGTON -- Widening its war on its get-tough policy on copyright piracy Thursday as it asked Congress to approve new laws increasing penalties for copyright infringement and making it easier for authorities to prosecute intellectual property theft. on copyright pirates, the Bush administration asked Congress on Thursday to enact new laws for protecting intellectual property and make it easier for authorities to put violators behind bars. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales told a U.S. Chamber of Commerce conference on intellectual property crime that the laws were needed because piracy is getting easier, the money it generates finds its way to other illegal activities -- including terrorism -- and the nation's economy depends on the copyright-enabled industries. "I think legislation is absolutely necessary as we are at a critical point as the technology is changing so quickly," Gonzales said. "Because of the changes in technology, it's so much easier (to pirate) now. What that's doing is encouraging large-scale criminal enterprises to get involved in intellectual property theft, and that involvement is used, quite frankly, to fund terrorist activities. It is a great concern to the Department of Justice and the administration."

Bush seeks tough new piracy laws

WASHINGTON -- Widening its war on copyright pirates, the Bush administration asked Congress on Thursday to enact new laws for protecting intellectual property and make it easier for authorities to put violators behind bars. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales told a U.S. Chamber of Commerce conference on intellectual property crime that the laws were needed because piracy is getting easier, the money it generates finds its way to other illegal activities -- including terrorism -- and the nation's economy depends on the copyright-enabled industries. "I think legislation is absolutely necessary as we are at a critical point as the technology is changing so quickly," Gonzales said. "Because of the changes in technology, it's so much easier (to pirate) now. What that's doing is encouraging large-scale criminal enterprises to get involved in intellectual property theft, and that involvement is used, quite frankly, to fund terrorist activities. It is a great concern to the Department of Justice and the administration."

Bush seeks tough new piracy laws

WASHINGTON -- Widening its war on copyright pirates, the Bush administration asked Congress on Thursday to enact new laws for protecting intellectual property and make it easier for authorities to put violators behind bars. Attorney General Alberto Gonzales told a U.S. Chamber of Commerce conference on intellectual property crime that the laws were needed because piracy is getting easier, the money it generates finds its way to other illegal activities -- including terrorism -- and the nation's economy depends on the copyright-enabled industries. "I think legislation is absolutely necessary as we are at a critical point as the technology is changing so quickly," Gonzales said. "Because of the changes in technology, it's so much easier (to pirate) now. What that's doing is encouraging large-scale criminal enterprises to get involved in intellectual property theft, and that involvement is used, quite frankly, to fund terrorist activities. It is a great concern to the Department of Justice and the administration."

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