Rebecca Nicholson - News Poster

News

Anne Reid: 'Why am I cast as dreadful mothers? I’m adorable!’

She’s played Valerie Tatlock in Coronation Street and Daniel Craig’s lover in The Mother, and now stars in the thriller Kaleidoscope. Anne Reid talks to Rebecca Nicholson about awards, Victoria Wood and why it’s good to show older people falling in love on screen

‘What can I tell you without giving the whole plot away? That’s the problem,” smiles Anne Reid. We’re meeting to talk about Kaleidoscope, a knotty, taut and claustrophobic thriller starring Reid and Toby Jones, directed by his brother, Rupert Jones. It’s the kind of brilliantly insidious film that reveals its secrets slowly and cleverly. It’s far better to see it knowing absolutely nothing at all about it. Which, of course, makes it very difficult to talk about. “Well, let’s not tell people then,” Reid decides, firmly. “I play the mother of Toby Jones. It was a great part.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Will the Menendez murders become America's next true-crime TV hit?

Law & Order True Crime: The Menendez Murders revisits a crime that shocked the Us and tries to follow in the footsteps of The People v Oj Simpson

It has been 25 years since the Menendez brothers graced the American evening news, and one wonders if television audiences will really remember very much about them. It’s doubtful enough people will recall them enough to make Law & Order: True Crime’s version of The Menendez Murders – which starts Tuesday on NBC – the nostalgia-fest that American Crime Story: The People v Oj Simpson was. The crime was big news when it aired and then vanished afterwards, a taste for alleged evil very easily forgotten. The story was about rich people, who were not particularly interesting.

Related: True crime makes great TV. But must it linger on women’s corpses? | Rebecca Nicholson

Here you had a much simpler armchair-detective question: were the Menendez sons sociopaths?
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Hey, Love Island, jump into the 21st century – the same-sex action is lovely | Fay Schopen

The contestants’ heterosexual couplings are relentlessly fake, vanilla and vacuous. Some Lgbt action would at least make the reality show more real

• Fay Schopen is a freelance journalist

This weekend I battled through vast crowds of ecstatic carousers in Soho – in various states of costume and inebriation – who were revelling in the annual Pride festival, a public celebration of joy, love, and being out, proud and Lgbt. I was there for a pre-wedding dinner with one of my closest friends – his Irish long-term boyfriend proposed in 2015, when same-sex marriage became legal in Ireland.

So far so unremarkable. This is Britain in 2017. I’m now engaged to a wonderful man – but have had partners of both sexes in the past. There’s a spectrum of sexuality; we’re all on it at different points.

Related: Love Island is only the latest in ‘sneak porn’ TV | Barbara Ellen

Related: Finally, a gay Blind Date.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Finally, a gay Blind Date. What took so long? | Rebecca Nicholson

While other programmes such as First Dates and Naked Attraction have a casual approach to sexuality, the revamped revival is at last to have its first Lgbt show

Rebecca Nicholson is a freelance writer

Blind Date has been revamped for its Channel 5 revival, earning itself a new set which resembles a cross between a fidget spinner and the inside of an engine. Paul O’Grady has stepped into the hosting shoes of his good friend Cilla Black, and he has an affable way with the contestants, chatting to them about their lack of romantic success with the wonder and bewilderment of a meddling old auntie who cannot fathom dating apps.

Related: Relaunched Blind Date to celebrate Pride with first Lgbt episode

Related: A return for Pat Sharp and Fun House? Don’t fall for the nostalgia trap | Phoebe-Jane Boyd

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Relaunched Blind Date to celebrate Pride with first Lgbt episode

Campaign group Stonewall ‘thrilled’ as Channel 5 announces ‘inclusive’ show will air on day of London’s Pride parade

More than 30 years after it was first broadcast, Blind Date is to reach a landmark moment this weekend when it airs its first Lgbt episode.

The dating show, which returned to British screens last month on Channel 5, is showing the episode to coincide with London’s Pride parade on Saturday.

Related: Finally, a gay Blind Date. What took so long? | Rebecca Nicholson

Related: A lorra lorra LOLs: how Blind Date can keep up in the age of Tinder

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Kaya Scodelario: 'Nine times out of 10, my character is with a guy twice my age'

She’s gone from teenage tearaway in TV’s Skins to working with Johnny Depp in the latest Pirates of the Caribbean film – but, she says, filming wasn’t all swashbuckling fun and games

• Plus: Rebecca Nicholson looks at what other Skins alumni have gone on to do

Kaya Scodelario makes a lot of sense as the newest Disney princess. She has the big blue eyes beloved of animators and displays a spunky attitude on screen that inspires hero worship in seven-year-old fledgling feminists. Most importantly, like her Pirates of the Caribbean predecessor, Keira Knightley, Scodelario combines a delicate, aristocratic beauty that gets her cast as 18th-century damsels with the sort of wry humour that delights in subverting such outmoded movie nonsense. Carina Smyth, the orphan and “woman of science” she plays in the new Pirates movie is, Scodelario says: “completely from the other side of the tracks. She’s a survivor,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Kaya Scodelario: 'Nine times out of 10, my character is with a guy twice my age'

She’s gone from teenage tearaway in TV’s Skins to working with Johnny Depp in the latest Pirates of the Caribbean film – but, she says, filming wasn’t all swashbuckling fun and games

• Plus: Rebecca Nicholson looks at what other Skins alumni have gone on to do

Kaya Scodelario makes a lot of sense as the newest Disney princess. She has the big blue eyes beloved of animators and displays a spunky attitude on screen that inspires hero worship in seven-year-old fledgling feminists. Most importantly, like her Pirates of the Caribbean predecessor, Keira Knightley, Scodelario combines a delicate, aristocratic beauty that gets her cast as 18th-century damsels with the sort of wry humour that delights in subverting such outmoded movie nonsense. Carina Smyth, the orphan and “woman of science” she plays in the new Pirates movie is, Scodelario says: “completely from the other side of the tracks. She’s a survivor,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The end has no end: Girls and the difficult art of the TV finale

How have long-running shows managed to end things without fan uproar?

The Wire’s hood philosopher Avon Barksdale once said this about prison: “You only do two days: the day you go in and the day you come out.” By that same tack, a TV show-runner only writes a pilot and a finale. The only thing tougher than introducing a cast of characters is giving them a proper sendoff, the unenviable task Lena Dunham faced as her zeitgeist-capturing sitcom Girls ended on Sunday. After six years of fights, impromptu kitchen dance parties, and brutally awkward nudity, she had to assign fates that satisfy the fans while bringing their story to a logical conclusion, a special challenge for characters defined by their chronic inability to get and keep their acts together.

Related: 'You're a bad friend!': Girls took a toxic view of female friendships

Related: Girls has come to an end.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Emmys 2015: winners and performances – as it happened

  • The Guardian - TV News
Game of Thrones, Olive Ketteridge and Veep won big, with HBO cleaning up in all categories while Viola Davis, Amy Schumer and host Andy Samberg starred

Emmys 2015: full list of winnersInside Amy Schumer wins first-ever variety sketch show awardEmmy 2015: red carpet fashion – in picturesTransparent star Jeffrey Tambor dedicates Emmy to transgender community - videoSee all our 2015 Emmys coverage here

4.04am BST

Alright, here is a quick rundown of my Top 10 Moments from this Year’s Emmys.

10. Allison Janney’s hot Emmy date.

4.00am BST

More on that Viola Davis speech. Here’s a transcript of the first half:

I am going to hang this speech on a wall! That is all. https://t.co/Zrb3FtmEnj

3.59am BST

Game of Thrones. A huge upset for Mad Men and it now won 12 trophies this year on 24 nominations. One of TV’s biggest shows is now one of its most decordated.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Four hundred shows and no time to watch them: is there too much TV on television?

The head of Us channel FX says there are simply too many dramas for the discerning viewer to get through – and he has a point

The Bruce Springsteen song 57 Channels (and Nothin’ on) reflects the popular prejudice that television represents quantity without quality.

However, John Landgraf, CEO of the channel FX, argued at a recent industry conference that the medium is now facing a new crisis of supply. He calculated that 371 original scripted TV shows were made in the Us in 2014, while the tally for the current year may pass 400. “There is simply too much television,” he said.

Related: Save me from my TV obsession (but don't forget to record the new Veep) | Rebecca Nicholson

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Guardian Film Show - Podcast

Helmed this week by Rebecca Nicholson, the Guardian Film Show looks at the week's big releases and hears cheers or boos from critics Peter Bradshaw and Catherine Shoard. They assess Colin Firth spy caper Kingsman: The Secret Service, Paul Thomas Anderson's Pynchon adaptation Inherent Vice, Stephen Daldry's Brazilian adventure Trash, and a superpowered Disney animation in Big Hero 6. Plus there are interviews with Joaquin Phoenix and Katherine Waterston Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Guardian Film Show – Kingsman: The Secret Service, Inherent Vice, Trash and Big Hero 6 – video reviews

  • The Guardian - Film News
Helmed this week by Rebecca Nicholson, the Guardian Film Show looks at the week's big releases and hears cheers or boos from critics Peter Bradshaw and Catherine Shoard. They assess Colin Firth spy caper Kingsman: The Secret Service, Paul Thomas Anderson's Pynchon adaptation Inherent Vice, Stephen Daldry's Brazilian adventure Trash, and a superpowered Disney animation in Big Hero 6. Plus there are interviews with Joaquin Phoenix and Katherine Waterston

If you'd rather watch each review individually, you can – here are Kingsman: The Secret Service, Inherent Vice, Trash, and Big Hero 6 Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Golden Globe nominations 2015: Girls and Selma among nominees – as it happened

Birdman swooped in and nabbed seven nominations, Scandal was snubbed and Ava DuVernay became the first black woman to be nominated for the best director gong.

Birdman soars over the competition at 2015 Golden Globe nominations

What the Golden Globes 2015 nominations say about TV right nowThe full list of nominationsGolden Globes 2015: a lively list to kick off the awards season

11.05am Et

Right. We’ll wrap things up there. Things to take away from today’s nominations:

10.56am Et

Peter Bradshaw has file his thoughts on the Globes. Here’s a snippet:

It’s the Globes! Hardly any institution has benefitted more from the rise of the awards-season and the predominance of celebrity culture. Once mocked for being the rackety and faintly preposterous creation of Hollywood’s grandly-titled Foreign Press Association, the Globes is now not just a curtain-raiser for the Oscars, but an event which visibly luxuriates in being
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Homeland recap: season four, episode one The Drone Queen

The Homeland reboot means no Langley, no Brody (of course), a particularly dislikeable Carrie and a new location in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Are you glad to see it back?

Hello! Ill be taking over from Rebecca Nicholson on Homeland recapping duties this season. Im looking forward to reading your observations and wild theories, so please do share them in the comments.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The Great British Bake Off 2014: episode six as it happened

Last week Norman got the boot, but who were the winners and losers in the European Cake challenge? Rebecca Nicholson was watching

8.59pm BST

Thanks to everyone who joined me tonight, its been a real delight. Heidis back with the liveblog and bingo for next weeks episode, in which we apparently get to see Nancy shouting come on pasties! at an oven. Im already envious. Until next time! Goodnight all.

8.57pm BST

Mary and the male judge dont agree on who should be axed - the race to the bottom has been even between Richard and Kate. But theyve both been spared! I called it at the start. Both live to fight another week.

8.55pm BST

Its Chetna! About time too.

8.52pm BST

Kate didnt have enough caramel, but its fine, Chetnas made enough for everyone. That looks fantastic.

8.51pm BST

Thats what I call a showstopper. Mary loves Luis.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

The best TV of 2014 so far

Happy Valley brought Nordic noir to Yorkshire and True Detective plunged Matthew McConaughey into the abyss. It's been a vintage six months for TV, say our critics

Stuart Heritage on the year so far

 Best films of 2014 (so far)

Best albums of 2014 (so far)

Sally Wainwright's six-part crime drama seemed to follow in the footsteps of last year's Broadchurch: it had the feel of a Nordic-noir show, filtered through a doggedly British lens, and became the sort of television that couldn't be watched alone, if only for the emotional support offered by knowing that six million people were also going through it. The script was excellent, the plot bleak but engrossing, and Sarah Lancashire's performance as Catherine Cawood, a police sergeant still raw with rage and grief after the rape and suicide of her daughter years previously, provided a devastating gut-punch of pure emotion. Rebecca Nicholson

Continue reading.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Girls recap: season three, episode nine – Flo

A family reunion prompted by Mom's illness brings Hannah and her sisters together in a standalone mini-movie, and the gang aren't missed at all

Spoiler Alert: this blog is published after the Us transmission; the UK broadcasts the episodes a week later.

• Read Rebecca Nicholson's episode eight blogpost

It was about time Hannah went home. Much like this episode, her previous visit in season one's The Return made Girls feel like a different show. To my mind this was a self-contained mini-movie with its own mood and tone. It's also refreshing to have a break from selfish 20-somethings for a while, even if they are replaced by selfish 50-somethings indulging in later-life narcissism. And that final twist was a genuine shock, much to the credit of June Squibb, who did a wonderful, scene-stealing job as Flo.

Hannah

This was an explanation of Hannah and a warning for her, too:
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Girls recap: season three, episode eight – Incidentals

Another very funny episode, with Hannah and Adam enjoying success and Marnie still unable to catch a break. Plus, a scene-stealing appearance from Patti LuPone

Spoiler Alert: this blog is published after the Us transmission; the UK broadcasts the episodes a week later.

• Read Rebecca Nicholson's episode seven blogpost

I'd like to dedicate this blog to Patti LuPone, who, over the course of one too-brief scene, became one of my favourite people. (Mostly as a result of to answering the question, "What's your favourite form of physical exercise?" with "Sleeping.") This was another top-notch, very funny episode, as Hannah worried about losing Adam, Marnie actually lost Ray, Jessa lost any pretence of sobriety and Shoshanna, presumably, didn't do much so she could recover from losing her shit at everyone last week.

Hannah

It turns out that Hannah is getting paid a lot to spend a night in a suite
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Media Talk podcast: Radio 1 chart show moves the goalposts

John Plunkett is joined by MediaGuardian reporter Maggie Brown and Shortlist Media chief executive Mike Soutar to discuss the week's media news.

Radio 1 has announced another shakeup to the way the Top 40 singles will be counted, as streaming services such as Spotify are taken into account. But what will be the weighting compared to downloads and physical sales?

And the latest ABCs for the magazine industry are out – and it's good news for Good Housekeeping, but not so good for the NME. Mike Soutar explains why.

Maggie Brown has been hearing Ofcom's departing chair, Dame Colette Bowe, explain how she thinks the BBC should share its licence fee, in an extension of contestable funding. What will it mean for the other public service broadcasters – and can any top-slicing avoid government bureaucracy?

Plus, in Rebecca Nicholson's TV Lair, the reviewer discusses the second series of House of Cards, Sky1's
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Girls recap: season three, episode seven – Beach House

A trip to the coast, and Shoshanna finally tells the others in the group exactly what she thinks of them all. But will Hannah take any notice?

Spoiler Alert: this blog is published after the Us transmission; the UK broadcasts the episodes a week later.

• Read Rebecca Nicholson's episode six blogpost

Welcome back, Girls! I know it's only been a week, but I was starting to feel like this season was treading water (though I know from the comments that some of you liked last week's episode more than I did). The first two seasons had provocations and talk-about-this moments scattered throughout, and so far, it hasn't felt so vital. However an away-episode always seems to inject new life, and that after-dinner showdown was utterly brilliant, giving the characters chance to voice a lot of what us viewers have surely been thinking. (I'm team Shoshanna after all that, by the way.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Credited With | External Sites