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Who Is Oscar Best Song Nominee Sufjan Stevens, Beloved by Indie-Rock Fans and Music Supervisors?

Who Is Oscar Best Song Nominee Sufjan Stevens, Beloved by Indie-Rock Fans and Music Supervisors?
Sufjan Stevens is a household name… if you happen to live in an indie-rock household. Among the broader pool of Oscar-watching or -voting homes, there may be a bigger Sufjan-ian learning curve. (For starters: his name is pronounced soof-yon.) The singer/songwriter who just snagged a nomination for “Mystery of Love,” one of his contributions to the “Call Me By Your Name” soundtrack, doesn’t easily lend himself to any nutshell treatment, as any novice who’s come away confused from Stevens’ sprawling Wikipedia page can attest.

He hasn’t been a mystery to music supervisors, anyway. The two songs he contributed to “Call Me By Your Name” represent his first original compositions for a nonfiction feature film, but most TV viewers, at least, have probably happened across his music before. His song “Death With Dignity” was featured in the pilot episode of “This is Us” and recurred toward the end of the season. Going back a
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘How To Talk To Girls At Parties’ Trailer: Nicole Kidman & Elle Fanning Make Punk A Way Of Life

Led by Nicole Kidman and Elle Fanning, with a soundtrack featuring artists including Nico Muhly, Jamie Stewart of Xiu Xiu, Matmos and AC Newman of The New Pornographers, it’s a little bit disappointing that “How To Talk To Girls At Parties” has been a bit lost in the wind since debuting at Cannes. The film is gearing up to roll out internationally as we wait any news of a U.S.

Continue reading ‘How To Talk To Girls At Parties’ Trailer: Nicole Kidman & Elle Fanning Make Punk A Way Of Life at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Neo Yokio’ Voice Cast: A Visual Guide to Who Played Whom in New Netflix Animated Series

  • Indiewire
‘Neo Yokio’ Voice Cast: A Visual Guide to Who Played Whom in New Netflix Animated Series
[Editor’s note: This post contains very minor spoilers for Season 1 of “Neo Yokio.”]

Netflix has a fascinating track record with animation, taking big chances especially with adult-aimed series like “BoJack Horseman” and “F Is for Family” over the last few years. Its latest venture, “Neo Yokio,” looks nothing like either of those series — instead, it draws its visual inspiration from decades of anime as it brings us into the futuristic world created by Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig.

What does give “Neo Yokio” something in common with its Netflix sisters is its A-list voice cast, which features an eclectic but overall critically acclaimed group of actors, including Jaden Smith as young demon hunter Kaz, who just wants to be the most eligible bachelor in town, despite the growing sense that things might not be what they seem in this society.

Who are the other famous faces behind the scenes? Below is an illustrated guide to all of Neo Yokio’s VIPs.

Read More:
See full article at Indiewire »

‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ Review: Elle Fanning Is a Free Love Alien in John Cameron Mitchell’s Bizarre Return to Form

‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ Review: Elle Fanning Is a Free Love Alien in John Cameron Mitchell’s Bizarre Return to Form
Hokey aliens invade the seventies British punk scene in John Cameron Mitchell’s “How to Talk to Girls at Parties,” and the results are not nearly as ridiculous as that sounds — for a while, at least. Channeling the communal intimacy of “Shortbus” and the riotous musicality of “Hedwig and the Angry Inch,” Mitchell transforms Neil Gaiman’s sci-fi short story into a vibrant, edgy and at times outright goofy statement on tough antiestablishment rebels and freewheeling hippy vibes, suggesting that they’re not really all that that different.

At its center, scrawny, leather-clad punk teen Enn (Alex Sharp) veers across the grimy London suburb of Croydon alongside equally rambunctious pals John (Ethan Lawrence) and Vic (Abraham Lewis), heckling at passersby en route to a noisy concert. As English rockers The Damned blast on the soundtrack, the frame rate gets jagged and the kids seem to content to run wild in
See full article at Indiewire »

Joshua Reviews Bill And Turner Ross’ Contemporary Color [Theatrical Review]

There are few subcultures more niche than that of “the color guard.” The vast majority of people may know them only as those performers working alongside high school marching bands during football games each fall. Young men and women taking to the field to perform routines heavily centered around the use of flags, rifles and sabers, these routines are more often than not overlooked by people waiting for the next play of whatever game they’re partaking in.

However, not in the eyes of iconic musician David Byrne.

In the summer of 2015, Byrne took to Brooklyn’s Barclays Center, along with a collection of some of today’s greatest artists and color guard teams to shine a light on the real beauty, importance and power of this artform. And filmmakers Bill and Turner Ross were there to capture it.

The film born from this event is called Contemporary Color and is a breathlessly beautiful,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Watch David Byrne Hype 'Contemporary Color' in New Doc Trailer

Watch David Byrne Hype 'Contemporary Color' in New Doc Trailer
In the summer of 2015, former Talking Heads mastermind David Byrne recruited a crew of forward-thinking musicians – including St. Vincent, Devonté Hynes, Tune-Yards, Zola Jesus and Money Mark/Ad-Rock – to write original music for "Contemporary Color," a series of elaborately choreographed color guard events.

Oscilloscope Laboratories released a new trailer for the bizarre project, showcasing the 10 color guards and 10 composers (also including Nelly Furtado, How to Dress Well, Lucius and Nico Muhly/Ira Glass). "Everybody kinda gets one shot at this, and this is it," a giddy Byrne tells the camera crew.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Lesley Barber Discusses Scoring ‘Manchester by the Sea’ and Kenneth Lonergan’s Precision

Few descriptors have become more tired and less useful than “symphonic,”and so people have a right to be wary when I say it befits Manchester by the Sea more than perhaps any other film released this year. Kenneth Lonergan‘s third feature is also his third consecutive triumph of people, place, scenario, behaviors, and communication (or lack thereof), a movie that is deeply felt largely because its powers can’t be pinpointed.

Composer Lesley Barber reunites with Lonergan after 2000’s You Can Count on Me, here delivering a score whose presence on the soundtrack is, like the surrounding film, something of a contradiction: unmissable yet unintrusive, and enveloping as it disappears into the dramatic action. Inexperienced though I may be in the practice of speaking with composers, I found in Manchester a perfect entry point; it’s hard to imagine a person who won’t come away with some
See full article at The Film Stage »

A different dance by Anne-Katrin Titze

Reset directors Alban Teurlai and Thierry Demaizière Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In Reset (Relève), Thierry Demaizière and Alban Teurlai chronicle the path to the premiere of Benjamin Millepied's first ballet at the Opéra National de Paris in the fall of 2015. We hear composer Nico Muhly and the energetic young conductor Maxime Pascal discuss the quality of a lion's roar and the need for a "more menacing, dangerous piano." Designer for Lady Gaga, Tilda Swinton, Björk, and Scarlett Johansson, Iris van Herpen, whose tutus here are unorthodox, is specific about the colors, wanting "the black less black and the white a very light grey."

Benjamin Millepied: "For American people, Benjamin is a Frenchman …"

Millepied is known as the choreographer for Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan, starring Natalie Portman, Mila Kunis, Winona Ryder and Vincent Cassel. Vincent Lindon, revolvers; Karl Lagerfeld, un roi seul and Robert Luchini, dit Fabrice on Fabrice Luchini
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Tribeca awards announced by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2016-04-23 13:17:03

David Byrne is all smiles as Bill Ross lV and Turner Ross' Contemporary Color captures two awards Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Contemporary Color, under Dp Jarred Alterman and with the Beastie Boys' Adam Horovitz, Devonté Hynes, Nelly Furtado, Nico Muhly, Ira Glass, St. Vincent, Money Mark, Holly Laessig and Jess Wolfe, providing some of the music to David Byrne's color guard extravaganza, has scored twice at this year's Tribeca Film Festival awards.

Us Narrative Competition winners

Dean, directed by Demteri Martin; Actor Dominic Rains in Ian Olds' The Fixer; Actress Mackenzie Davis in Sophia Takal's Always Shine; Cinematography - Michael Ragen for Justin Tipping's Kicks; Screenplay - Ingrid Jungermann for her Women Who Kill. The Nora Ephron Prize - Rachel Tunnard for Adult Life Skills; Albert Maysles Award - David Feige for Untouchable. Best New Narrative Director - Priscilla Anany for Children Of The Mountain.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

A Flag Waves In Brooklyn

Team Experience is at the Tribeca Film Festival. Here's Jason on Contemporary Color.

I vaguely remember Color Guard being a thing we had at my high school -- I know it might shock and awe you that this particular film nerd writing at you today wasn't all that into sports back then (besides the occasional loitering around a wrestling match now and then, ahem) so I don't recall ever seeing them at work though, flinging their prop guns like ballistic missiles through the air.  They seemed like a sub-set within a sub-set, not quite band and not quite the cheer-leading squad. Something in between, but also outside of.

Contemporary Color, which documents the recent shows in Brooklyn that Talking Heads' legend David Byrne organized in an effort to toss this sport under a great big spotlight, pairing ten different teams with ten different modern musician-composers (people like St Vincent
See full article at FilmExperience »

Tribeca Film Festival encore highlights by Anne-Katrin Titze

David Byrne conceives Contemporary Color by Bill Ross IV and Turner Ross Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Of Horses And Men director Benedikt Erlingsson's latest The Show Of Shows (Storyville); Ferne Pearlstein's The Last Laugh with Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner, Sarah Silverman, Robert Clary, Rob Reiner, Harry Shearer, Jeffrey Ross, Alan Zweibel, Gilbert Gottfried, Judy Gold, Larry Charles, David Steinberg, Susie Essman, Lisa Lampanelli and Hanala Sagal (co-writer of Liza Johnson's Elvis & Nixon); Nicole Kidman, Christopher Walken, Maryann Plunkett, Kathryn Hahn and Marin Ireland in Jason Bateman's The Family Fang, screenplay by David Lindsay-Abaire; Contemporary Color, with camerawork by Jessica Oreck, Sean Price Williams, Michael Palmieri, Robert Greene, Wyatt Gerfield, Amanda Rose Wilder, under Dp Jarred Alterman and with Beastie Boys' Adam Horovitz, Devonté Hynes, Nelly Furtado, Nico Muhly, Ira Glass, St. Vincent, Money Mark, Holly Laessig and Jess Wolfe, providing some of the music to David Byrne
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Interview: Alfonso Gomez-Rejon for ‘Me and Earl and The Dying Girl’

One of my favourite movies of kast year is the superb Me and Earl and The Dying Girl. It’s a truly delightful film that hits the home formats on 11th January. Thomas Mann, Rj Cyler and Olivia Cooke lead the cast of the film, but we caught up with film’s talented director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon who spoke about his movie.

What was it about Me And Earl And The Dying Girl that appealed to you as a filmmaker?

The idea that you can learn about people after they die, you just have to pay attention. The second I read that line I thought ‘What a beautiful idea’. I had just lost someone very close to me – namely my father – and I was having difficulty incorporating loss into my life and making something out of it instead of letting it destroy me. It felt like a movie I could personalise.
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Best New Rock/Pop/Electronic Albums/EPs of 2015

Another year, another move further away from caring about pop. Whether that's pop's fault or mine, I'm not sure. But there was still plenty of great new music released in 2015, and here, according to my idiosyncratic tastes, are the best albums, or at least my favorites.

1. Wire: Wire (Pink Flag)

This is said to be the first time that Bruce Gilbert's replacement, guitarist Matthew Simms, was heavily involved in the creation of a Wire album, and the result is...the closest Wire has ever come to sounding like a Colin Newman album. I exaggerate for effect, but only slightly: most everything thrums along smoothly and motorik-ly, he takes all the lead vocals (though Graham Lewis supposedly wrote many of the lyrics), and there are none of the post-punkier outbursts of the group's previous two reunion albums, though near the end of Wire, the one-two punch of "Split Your Ends" and "Octopus" come close.
See full article at CultureCatch »

Watch Joanna Newsom Perform Hypnotic 'Leaving the City' on 'Colbert'

Watch Joanna Newsom Perform Hypnotic 'Leaving the City' on 'Colbert'
Joanna Newsom hushed the Late Show audience on Tuesday with a commanding performance of "Leaving the City," a track from her recently released fourth LP, Divers. Newsom's inimitable coo and ethereal harp took center stage, with two keyboardists and a drummer interjecting for vivid dynamic shifts.

Newsom told Rolling Stone that the complex interlocking rhythms on "Leaving the City" required her to design her own notational system – "like, these crescent moons and squares and triangles." One of the LP's key themes, she added, is "the question of what's available to
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Elle Fanning, Nicole Kidman begin 'How To Talk To Girls At Parties' shoot

  • ScreenDaily
Elle Fanning, Nicole Kidman begin 'How To Talk To Girls At Parties' shoot
“Punks and aliens” feature from director John Cameron Mitchell [pictured] also stars Alex Sharp.

Sci-fi romance How To Talk To Girls At Parties, starring Elle Fanning (Maleficent), Tony Award-winning Alex Sharp (The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time) and Nicole Kidman, has begun principal photography in the UK, where it will shoot for six weeks.

Directed by John Cameron Mitchell (Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Shortbus), the film is based on a short story by Neil Gaiman (Coraline) from his collection “Fragile Things”.

The screenplay has been written by Philippa Goslett (Little Ashes) with Mitchell. Kidman reunites with Mitchell, who directed her Oscar-nominated performance in Rabbit Hole (2010).

The cast also includes Ruth Wilson (The Affair), Matt Lucas (Bridesmaids) and Joanna Scanlan (The Invisible Woman).

The story centres on a shy teenage punk in 1970s London (Sharp) who falls for an alien girl (Fanning) whose race plans a showdown with humans.

Producers are [link
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

Writer Jesse Andrews and director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon overturn the formula for the modern teen comedy: they lay on the quirky storytelling and goofy movie parodies, but also give us characters that are reasonably human and complex. We're soon invested in a warm and rewarding drama. Young actors Thomas Mann, Rj Cyler and Olivia Cooke deal with real problems, and the movie doesn't try to change the subject to sex in every scene. A charming show, very worthwhile. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl Blu-ray 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment 2015 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 105 min. / Street Date October 6, 2015 / Starring Thomas Mann, Rj Cyler, Olivia Cooke, Nick Offerman, Connie Britton, Molly Shannon, Jon Bernthal, Katherine C. Hughes, Matt Bennett. Masam Holden. <Cinematography Chung-hoon Chung Film Editor David Trachtenberg Original Music Brian Eno, Nico Muhly Written by Jesse Andrews from his novel Produced by Jeremy Dawson, Dan Fogelman, Steven Rales Directed by Alfonso Gomez-Rejon
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

A24 swoops on 'How To Talk To Girls At Parties'

  • ScreenDaily
A24 swoops on 'How To Talk To Girls At Parties'
The New York-based firm has acquired Us rights to John Cameron Mitchell’s upcoming sci-fi to star Elle Fanning, Nicole Kidman and Alex Sharp.

Production on How To Talk To Girls At Parties is scheduled for November based on Neil Gaiman’s short story about a shy teenage punk in 1970s London who falls for an alien girl whose race plans a showdown with humans.

Howard Gertler produces with Iain Canning and Emile Sherman, while Gaiman serves as executive producer.

“We are absolutely delighted to be getting on board How To Talk To Girls At Parties – the script is both great fun and an affectionate celebration of the outsider spirit and we know John Cameron Mitchell is the perfect person to bring this wild and singular universe to life,” said A24.

“We are thrilled to be working with him along with the movie’s top-tier producing team.”

“A24 is the best Us indie film distributor for a film
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Elle Fanning-Nicole Kidman Drama ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ Bought by A24

Elle Fanning-Nicole Kidman Drama ‘How to Talk to Girls at Parties’ Bought by A24
A24 has acquired U.S. rights to John Cameron Mitchell’s drama “How To Talk To Girls At Parties,” starring Elle Fanning, Nicole Kidman and Alex Sharp.

The film, set to start production in November, is based on a short story by Neil Gaiman. Producers are Howard Gertler (Mitchell’s “Shortbus”), Iain Canning and Emile Sherman. Mitchell is exec producing.

How to Talk to Girls at Parties” focuses on a shy teenage punk rocker in 1970s suburban London and his two closest friends who sneak into a party where they meet a group of otherworldly girls — and realize the girls are literally from outer space. The lead character falls in love with one of the girls, despite the nefarious plans of the aliens.

The project reteams Mitchell with Kidman, who collaborated on the 2010 drama “Rabbit Hole.” Kidman received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress.

“A24 is the best U.S.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

A24 Acquires New John Cameron Mitchell Film

A24 Acquires New John Cameron Mitchell Film
The acquisitions scene has been quiet in Toronto this year, though A24 has just nabbed one of the big pre-buys off the market with John Cameron Mitchell's "How to Talk to Girls at Parties." The film will unite Mitchell with Alex Sharp, Tony winner from Broadways "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time," and once again with Nicole Kidman, Oscar-nominated for his 2010 drama "Rabbit Hole." Based on a story by cult author Neil Gaiman, who executive-produces alongside producers Howard Gertler and Iain Canning and Emile Sherman, "How to Talk to Girls" starts shooting in November. The film centers on a teen punk rocker, Enn, in 1970s suburban London who, with his two close friends, crash a party of otherworldly women they soon realize are actually aliens from another planet, and they have a malevolent plan in mind. Mitchell cowrote the script with Philippa Goslett ("Little Ashes") and,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

This Mixtape By The 'Me and Earl and the Dying Girl' Director Is a Cinephile Indulgence

  • Indiewire
This Mixtape By The 'Me and Earl and the Dying Girl' Director Is a Cinephile Indulgence
Read More: Check Out These 10 Parody Movie Posters From 'Me And Earl And The Dying Girl' We've broken down the playlist by track, followed by commentary. You can play the full playlist (save for one track that was not available on Spotify) by scrolling down to the bottom of this page. Enjoy! Gomez-Rejon originally chose Georges Delerue's "Chorale" from the 1973 Francois Truffaut film "Day for Night" as the score for the high school sequence at the beginning of the film. "It really worked, it was like the soundtrack in this cinephile's head," he told us. "'Day for Night' was his way in." As the film began to evolve during post-production, Gomez-Rejon decided to switch to an original composition, which is how composer Nico Muhly ended up being brought in to create, as Gomez-Rejon put it, "a sound for the beginning" of the film -- i.
See full article at Indiewire »
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