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'The Punisher': Everything You Need to Know About Marvel's Vigilante Antihero

'The Punisher': Everything You Need to Know About Marvel's Vigilante Antihero
Black clothes. White skull. Smoking guns. These are the gloriously simple ingredients behind the Punisher, the no-holds-barred antihero who'll soon be starring in one of the fall's most anticipated series. As played by The Walking Dead's Jon Bernthal during the second season of Netflix's Daredevil, the gun-toting vigilante stole every scene he was in, making the network's relentless campaign of teases and trailers damn near irresistible. But like every major superhero, he's taken a long strange trip from his comic-book origins to his modern-day multimedia superstardom. Below, you'll find
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Deadman: Lost Souls by Mike Baron and Kelley Jones

  • Comicmix
DC Comics thought it was riding a horror revival in the early ’90s, when it turned out they just had the good luck to hire Neil Gaiman to write Sandman. (Sure, the rest of the early Vertigo lineup, and the Vertigo precursors like the Alan Moore Swamp Thing, had a strong horror flavor in their superhero gumbo, but it was always a flavor rather than a main course, and it died out pretty much in parallel to Sandman wandering further and further away from horror.) But, along the way, they put out a bunch of comics with horror flavors — from vampire Batman to the creepiness of Shade the Changing Man — and revived a number of characters with horror in their DNA.

Deadman is one obvious example. He’s one of DC’s third-tier heroes, who’s had an ongoing series a few times but never long enough to really deserve that “ongoing” name.
See full article at Comicmix »

Deadman: Lost Souls by Mike Baron and Kelley Jones

  • Comicmix
DC Comics thought it was riding a horror revival in the early ’90s, when it turned out they just had the good luck to hire Neil Gaiman to write Sandman. (Sure, the rest of the early Vertigo lineup, and the Vertigo precursors like the Alan Moore Swamp Thing, had a strong horror flavor in their superhero gumbo, but it was always a flavor rather than a main course, and it died out pretty much in parallel to Sandman wandering further and further away from horror.) But, along the way, they put out a bunch of comics with horror flavors — from vampire Batman to the creepiness of Shade the Changing Man — and revived a number of characters with horror in their DNA.

Deadman is one obvious example. He’s one of DC’s third-tier heroes, who’s had an ongoing series a few times but never long enough to really deserve that “ongoing” name.
See full article at Comicmix »

Deadman: Lost Souls by Mike Baron and Kelley Jones

  • Comicmix
DC Comics thought it was riding a horror revival in the early ’90s, when it turned out they just had the good luck to hire Neil Gaiman to write Sandman. (Sure, the rest of the early Vertigo lineup, and the Vertigo precursors like the Alan Moore Swamp Thing, had a strong horror flavor in their superhero gumbo, but it was always a flavor rather than a main course, and it died out pretty much in parallel to Sandman wandering further and further away from horror.) But, along the way, they put out a bunch of comics with horror flavors — from vampire Batman to the creepiness of Shade the Changing Man — and revived a number of characters with horror in their DNA.

Deadman is one obvious example. He’s one of DC’s third-tier heroes, who’s had an ongoing series a few times but never long enough to really deserve that “ongoing” name.
See full article at Comicmix »

Lion Forge Comics releases preview of Rampage Jackson: Street Soldier

Lion Forge Comics has teamed up with Ufc star Quinton ‘Rampage’ Jackson and creators Fabian Nicieza (X-Men, Deadpool), Mike Baron (Nexus, Badger), Barbara Kesel (Hawk and Dove, Superboy), Leonardo Romero (Batman ‘66) and Fabiano Neves (Army of Darkness) for the superhero graphic novel Rampage Jackson: Street Soldier, and we have a preview for you here; click on any of the gallery images for hi-res versions…

A mash-up of Rampage’s superhuman fighting skill with a series of unexpected opponents, Rampage Jackson: Street Soldier is a highlight reel of the best things the superhero genre is capable of. Not content with soap operatics, super-Rampage travels the world (and space and time) to fight monsters, aliens, evil scientists, and bad guys of all stripes as he responds to threats against regular folks like you and me.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Steve Rude documentary comes to DVD, VOD

Steve Rude documentary comes to DVD, VOD
Ian Fischer's Steve Rude documentary will be released in October.

Rude Dude will be available on DVD and VOD on October 7.

The film has been screened at various conventions over 2014.

Rude Dude documents the creator's career and his move into fine arts, as well as his struggles with mental illness.

The 91-minute documentary includes interviews with Mike Baron, Paul Gulacy, Mike Richardson, Alex Ross and Mike Allred.

The DVD release includes two commentary tracks - one from Fischer and composer Ross Williams, the other from Rude's Nexus co-creator Baron.
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Mike Gold: Funny Books

It used to be, when I was about to go home from the San Diego Comic-Con or some other show that required a stupidly long plane ride, I’d drop by the dealer’s area (you know, that ever-shrinking portion of the main floor where people would actually sell comic books at a “comic book convention”) and I’d blow about twenty bucks on stuff to read on the return trip. These purchases were almost exclusively of “funny” comic books.

Sadly, we have come to the point where, in the world of contemporary comics, the phrase “funny comic books” has evolved from a redundancy to an oxymoron and the funniest comic around these days is Deadpool – a title with a death count high on the Tarantino scale.

No, the funny books I’m referring to were, well, funny. One of my favorites was Bud Sagendorf’s Popeye, a somewhat maligned
See full article at Comicmix »

Mike Gold: Bite My Twinkie

  • Comicmix
Some 30 years ago DC and Marvel produced a series of ads featuring their characters (except Superman) in one-page adventures hawking Hostess products. That campaign ran forever, so when we relaunched E-Man at First Comics I thought it would be fun to get people to do Hostess ad parodies featuring their creator-owned characters. John Byrne did Rog-2000, Max Collins and Terry Beatty did Mike Mist, Lee Marrs did Pudge Girl Blimp, Reed Waller did Omaha The Cat Dancer, and so on.

A few years later I was at DC Comics where I edited (interm-ly; Marv Wolfman was moving to the west coast and had some health issues) Teen Titans Spotlight. Mike Baron wrote a story featuring The Hawk (of the original Hawk and Dove) wherein the lead character uttered the epitaph “Bite My Twinkie!” Whereas it was completely in character, one of DC’s top-most executives took great offense at this.
See full article at Comicmix »

Michael Davis: The Baron Of Comics

  • Comicmix
One of the best writers the comic book industry has ever seen is Mike Baron. He created two of the greatest comic book properties ever, Nexus and the Badger. Mike has written for all of the major comic book companies and handled some of the biggest characters in comics. Mike has won two, count ‘em, two Eisners and has been nominated for a slew of awards including a Harvey.

On a personal note, Mike is also one of the few people I’ve given a painting to. That may not be a big deal for you but I don’t give away art so it’s a big deal for me.

Mike is a comic book treasure.

Mike is a fantastic writer.

Mike not only writes comics, he writes kick ass novels.

Mike is also a major pain in the ass.

Yeah, Mike is one persistent pain in the ass motherfucker.
See full article at Comicmix »

Book Review: Blood Lite III: Aftertaste

Blood Lite III: Aftertaste

The third book in the hilarious and horrifying national bestselling anthology series from the Horror Writers Association–a frightfest of sidesplitting stories from such “New York Times” bestselling authors as Jim Butcher, Sherrilyn Kenyon, Heather Graham, L.A. Banks, Kelley Armstrong, and many more

Horror fiction explores the dark side of human nature, often pushing the limits of violence, graphic gore, and extreme emotions. But with the popularity of shows and movies, such as “The Walking Dead,” “True Blood,” “Twilight,” “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” audiences have demonstrated their love for the genre–especially accompanied with a dose of humor to tone down the terror.

“Blood Lite III: Aftertaste” continues to put the fun back into dark fiction, featuring a wide range of humorous and highly entertaining horror-filled tales. Edited by Horror Writers Association founding member and award-winning author Kevin J. Anderson, the stories vary in tone
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

A Mike Baron Short Story: Bat Fan v. Fat Ban

This was it. Ragnarok, Armageddon, and Doomsday rolled into one. This was the premier of Batman: The Killer Croc’s Revenge, the latest installment in the greatest movie franchise of all time. Christian Bale as Batman. Gary Oldman as Chief Gordon. Lindsay Lohan as Rachel Dawes. And Sean Penn as Killer Croc.

Wayne Callard stood in line with 1500 other Bat Fans waiting for the Cinegrande Cineplex to open its doors. Wayne had been waiting in line for nineteen hours. He’d camped out on the sidewalk the previous night, swathing his bulk in two double-sized down-filled sleeping bags on a foam mattress. Wayne was five feet seven and weighed 350 lbs. He’d been born Cicero Wayne Callard.

“Man,” said Manny Ramirez standing next to Wayne and blowing on his hands, “I hope they open the doors soon! I could use a tube steak!” Manny wore Bat sneakers and a Batpack.
See full article at Comicmix »

Dennis O’Neil: Of Trilogies and Kindles

  • Comicmix
Based on…oh, I don’t know – some observation? A hunch? An angel whispering in my ear? Anyway, based on some darn thing, I hereby guess that some comics writers aren’t as aware of story structure as they might be – not as much as, say, their artistic first cousins, screen writers who, I’m told, are generally very aware of it, particularly if they’ve studied the craft in some college-level course, or read a few of the many books on the subject.

Well, although I do address the structure stuff in the courses I teach, I won’t burden you with it here and now. Not the time, not the place. However, maybe just a teensy bit of structure blather might not be amiss.

But first:

Have you noticed that trilogies seem to be the publishing rage? (Okay, not rage. Whimper?) There was the Girl in the Dragon Tattoo,
See full article at Comicmix »

Mike Gold: The Great Comic Book Retro-Expansion

Last week I bitched and moaned about how we’ve turned our backs on comics that can be appreciated by readers of all ages in order to follow the money that kids ain’t got and some adults might have. I also tied this into continuity impenetrable to newcomers that is spread over about a hundred dollars’ worth of monthly product. I can be snotty that way.

In just the past couple of years, we have seen something of a return to comics that can be enjoyed by readers young and old. Publishers can’t help the self-consciousness suffered by Baby Boomers and some Gen-Xers, but today’s new middle-agers were raised without much of the stigma us old folks suffered during the Wertham rage. So, I am now taking it upon myself to point out a few titles that work for a general audience that is fearless enough to
See full article at Comicmix »

Mike Gold: True-Life Nexus Comics

  • Comicmix
I first saw Nexus at one of those ancient Chicago Minicons we used to run at the beautiful and even ancienter Congress Hotel. The Minicon was an intense show held roughly every month, no matter the weather or the proximity of the latest Chicago Bears game. We had about 75 dealers tables, admission cost 75¢, our dealers and attendees drove in from a 350 mile radius, and the whole thing was over within five hours; less, if the Bears were playing that Sunday.

Our guests came from a similar radius, and frequently you’d see Jill Thompson, John Byrne, John Ostrander, Joe Staton, Paul Kupperberg, and a dozen or more at the tables near the entrance… as well as more than a few who were breaking into the business. Mike Baron, who lived about 80 miles north in Madison Wisconsin, was one such newbee, and when they launched their magazine-sized Nexus #1, he and artist
See full article at Comicmix »

Nexus Returns in Dark Horse Presents #12!

Press Release:

Dark Horse Comics announces the return of Nexus in Dark Horse Presents #12.

The fan-favorite title returns with its team of creators, Mike Baron (The Badger) and Steve Rude (The Moth), in their respective positions of writer and artist! Baron and Rude created Nexus in 1981 and have been continuing their canonical tale for thirty years. The Eisner Award winners will craft a brand-new three-part story for readers eager to quench their thirst for what’s next to come in the Nexusverse.

“The new stories crush anvils,” says Mike Baron.

“Nexus has never been a stranger to different publishers. Last seen under the Rude Dude banner in 2009, Nexus has stayed in limbo, never quite knowing when to return, or if he ever would return. Things come together in strange ways. With the backing of Mike Richardson of Dark Horse Comics, Nexus will return to comics,” Steve Rude said. “We especially
See full article at ScifiMafia »

First Comics, First Second Books, First Comics News, and firstcomics.com — Confused Yet?

Before the panel starts at San Diego Comic-Con, we hope somebody addresses the issues of potential for confusion in the marketplace and possible violation of trademark.

To start, we have First Comics. First Comics was a publisher co-founded by ComicMix’s own Mike Gold in 1983, notable for series like GrimJack, Jon Sable Freelance, Nexus, Badger, Whisper, Dreadstar, Shatter, Munden’s Bar, Classics Illustrated, and American Flagg! It published early work from John Ostrander, Timothy Truman, Norm Breyfogle, Mike Saenz, Mike Baron, as well as the first color appearance of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. It went out of business in 1991, and has published nothing in the twenty years since. Some of the series previously published by First have found their way to being published elsewhere, including ComicMix publishing GrimJack, Jon Sable Freelance, and Munden’s Bar.

It has been announced that will be a panel at this year’s San
See full article at Comicmix »

Tim Burton To Tackle Charles Addams?

It was a long, long running series of one-panel cartoons. It was an iconic teevee series. It was subject of two pretty decent movies. It was almost a DC Comic by Mike Baron and Bill Wray. It is the subject of a Broadway play that opened last week to mediocre reviews. And now it looks like The Addams Family will be a Tim Burton movie.

But with a twist. This adaptation will be based upon Charles Addams's misanthropic cartoons in the New Yorker magazine and not in the spirit of the teevee series. Woo-Hoo!

According to Deadline Hollywood, it isn't a done deal and Burton and his pal Johnny Depp are preparing their version of Dark Shadows. One wouldn't want Burton to get typecast, right?

Either way, Universal Studios paid for the rights and it's possible the movie might actually get made. If it winds up being a Burton-less
See full article at Comicmix »

The Pull List Comic Reviews: ‘Blackest Night’, ‘Powers’, ‘Archie’ & More!

Welcome to another edition of The Pull List Comic Reviews! This week, the Blackest Night event takes center stage, Bendis and Oeming make a triumphant comeback and Archie gets married (again). As always, Warning: Spoilers Ahead.

Pull Of The Week:

Blackest Night #5 [of 8]

DC Comics – $3.99 Us

Writer: Geoff Johns

Artist: Ivan Reis

Score: 9.0

The mastermind behind the dead rising stands revealed as the Blackest Night prophecy inches towards becoming true, but will the unified heroes of the world have enough to stop it? Not if a late dinner guest bearing gifts has anything to say about it.

Geoff Johns welcomes you all to hell. How could he not? In the thirty plus years that I’ve been reading comics, I can’t remember a time when things looked so grim in a story thanks to this issue. The big guns of the Justice League arrive in time to assist the Flashes
See full article at The Flickcast »

See also

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